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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am very tired of the "standard" carbon fiber look for the parts available for our cars (Although the honeycomb weave is unique). I delved into the Lamborghini concepts, along with Callaways work with forged carbon.

Forged Composite: Tech. Department - Car and Driver

I love the look of this material, and the inherent multidirectional strength of its makeup. So, is this a pipe dream or a possibility for the Elige?

image.jpg
 

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First time I saw that stuff was on the new Huracan at Sebring. Its really impressive compared to the now years old simple weaves. Would love it for a center console.


Never ceases to amaze me what Lamborghini can do with Carbon Fiber. My dad plans to pick up a Huracan soon so I will hopefully get some more close up views and seat time impressions ;)
 

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...
I love the look of this material, and the inherent multidirectional strength of its makeup.
...
That totally misses the majority of the point of CF and composites.
One selects a composite when the part needs to be engineered. A surf board is a good example. As they rarely split in half lengthwise, the majority of the weave is fore-n-aft. Plane wings probably followed surfboards, and skis are in the mix for having differing torsional, lateral and bending stiffness needs... Other wise they would be hogged out of a billet.

A homogeneous material kind of misses the whole engineering point of the advantages that a unidirectional filament offers.
 

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A homogeneous material kind of misses the whole engineering point of the advantages that a unidirectional filament offers.
Agree....notice how Lambo uses it as a cover. Not a structural part.
 

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Agree....notice how Lambo uses it as a cover. Not a structural part.
While it's true that traditional CF is highly directional, the forged carbon technology seems to be engineered to be non directional.

As for the engine covers, I think that's just more to highlight the technology in places where people can actually see, like "hey, we're working on some cool stuff!"
And, the 'forged composite' is developed FOR structural part. Their 'Tech Demo', Sesto Elemento used forged carbon lower wishbones, as well as the chassis itself. The chassis was made in sections and bolted together, iirc. Plus, I believe Boeing wants to use it in their airplane structures like window frames, etc. So all else considering, it'll be used for structural part eventually when the technology is ready for general(?) consumption.

Besides, the scope of the research was for going mass production not absolute strength and weight, since traditional method is too labor intensive and time consuming.
I'm guessing the production might eventually be similar to how Elise clams are made(RTM process).... mebbe.
 

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^This.
I fail to see how the chopped carbon is any better than fiberglass.

The whole point of carbon composites is to minimize the mass of the part. The way this is done is to orient the fibers such that they are in tension when the part is loaded. This allows the part to be tailored exactly to the applied loading. It is also the reason for honeycomb and other space making structures: they remove even more of the unloaded areas of the part while still maintaining proper cross section for bending loads.

Using chopped carbon like this means that about 75% of the carbon fibers are unloaded, and do not contribute to the strength of the part.

That said, if it catches on I'm sure you will be able to get Lotus parts made this way, as it eliminates most of the cost (and advantage) of normal carbon layups, meaning carbon parts can be made by spraying coated fibers into a mold with a chopper gun just like fiberglass.

Always beware of the marketing people, their job is to make everything sound like a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
While I'm sure there will copycat marketers that will imitate Lamborghini's forged carbon tech, it seems that the stuff from Lambo is legit. It was used on parts of their Sesto Elemento concept, and they are developing a chopped composite to use in suspension components. Beware of imitators though.

Lamborghini Experimenting With Chopped Carbon Fiber Suspension Parts for Future Cars
Agreed. It will be really interesting to see where this goes, since carbon weaves are so expensive.

I figured some enterprising person would want to experiment with the material here, given it's lower cost and such.
 

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looks too messy and some sort of 80s artwork.
 

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Agreed. It will be really interesting to see where this goes, since carbon weaves are so expensive.

I figured some enterprising person would want to experiment with the material here, given it's lower cost and such.
I doubt it.

The cost of the fabric is not too much.
Maybe 40-50 $/square yard.
But the labor costs are great.

One probably needs injection moulding for the new technology, which leaves out almost everyone fro home.
 

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The tend with carbon is actually in the opposite direction - very thin weaves which are directional. The only problem is that the layers are so thin they cannot be laid up by hand, plus it would take forever, so a computer plotter is required.

See North Thin Ply Technology
 

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It was first introduced by Lambo on the Sesto Elemento and re-used on the Aventador J seats :



I didnt know that went into production as an option on the Huracan.
And I'm also a bit sceptical about the muti-directional strengh thing. So far it looks comestic only...
 

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I read about the possible use of forged carbon for engine blocks and other components a few years back because of it’s weight to strength ratio.
 

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This looks like fiberglass "chopper gun" application for carbon fiber with a fancy name.
Exactly, good for lower cost mass production, filler, etc. strength is limited by resin bond as fibers are not continuous.
 
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