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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I was gonna post this on evilbay but I went hunting for forums to sell this on. I work at a Ford Dealership as a Painter. A local guy that lives 2 blocks away got ran off the road damaging his front end. We put a new one on and he left us the old. His car had about 10K miles on it. The damage isn't the end of the world, anyone with fiberglassing skills can fix it. Me, my boss, and a mechanic are selling off stuff in the shop. This is the 1st item to get rid of. We have it on the crate the new one came on. Would prefer pickup only but it would be up to them whether they would want to drive to meet you.

Our shop is located in Manchester, PA

$650 o.b.o.

email: [email protected]
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Discussion Starter #2
May I ask what some people's opinions are on this. Price to high? I'll come down that is merely a starting point. Thx
 

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if you were selling for a hundred or two someone would buy it as a novelty item.

at your price, your looking for a buyer that "needs" it, so that requires someone doing a repair on the cheap, with substantial frontal damage, probably with a yellow lotus in your general vicinity (PA). that's probably not a huge market. if you wait, someone will come along. i don't know bubkus about glass repair, so i can't comment on the condition, but your price is probably in the neighborhood. a buyer is likely to offer you less anyway, so i'd just hang tight.

$0.02
 

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Discussion Starter #4
if you were selling for a hundred or two someone would buy it as a novelty item.

at your price, your looking for a buyer that "needs" it, so that requires someone doing a repair on the cheap, with substantial frontal damage, probably with a yellow lotus in your general vicinity (PA). that's probably not a huge market. if you wait, someone will come along. i don't know bubkus about glass repair, so i can't comment on the condition, but your price is probably in the neighborhood. a buyer is likely to offer you less anyway, so i'd just hang tight.

$0.02
Ok, thanks
 

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Definately repairable, but as ace10 said, it will take the right buyer. I easily repaired mine and it had a little worse damage:
http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/showpost.php?p=915280&postcount=17

I think your asking price is ok... you did put O.B.O. after all. People can offer what it is worth to them. The main thing is that you have gotten the word out by placing this post.

Good luck with your sale! :up:
 

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I'd give you a hundred just to practice the glass repair on it. You know, just in case I ever have to do my own ;).
I have another clam (brand new Elise front clam) that I am about to cut up and reglass if you want to come watch! :D

I have already filled the front seam and faired that all in. I have also recut and shaped the front intake surrounds for some black mesh grilles (Exige style) that I am making. Next on my list is to remove the plinth and glass that all in.
 

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Filler/fairing materials

Baysailor,

I am curious about your experiences with repair, filler materials, and preparation for painting.

I have done some experiments on a section of a rear clam. I used West System epoxy with cloth etc. to get the basic structural integrity taken care of. I then used epoxy mixed with 407 micro-balloon filler to build up the surface. It worked fine except that it does not seem to be what you can use for the final surface preparation prior to painting, as I had quite a tiny few voids (that may be due to air bubbles?). A filler/primer paint does not seem to be enough to fill these voids. Have you seen this? For the work you did, what materials did you use, particularly for the final finish layer prior to paint?

TIA

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Baysailor,

I am curious about your experiences with repair, filler materials, and preparation for painting.

I have done some experiments on a section of a rear clam. I used West System epoxy with cloth etc. to get the basic structural integrity taken care of. I then used epoxy mixed with 407 micro-balloon filler to build up the surface. It worked fine except that it does not seem to be what you can use for the final surface preparation prior to painting, as I had quite a tiny few voids (that may be due to air bubbles?). A filler/primer paint does not seem to be enough to fill these voids. Have you seen this? For the work you did, what materials did you use, particularly for the final finish layer prior to paint?

TIA

Mark
If I was doing this repair. I'd use cloth and resin to build up the missing part, to get the structure back. Then I'd hit the damage with a layer of duraglass. Duraglass is bondo and fiberglass mixed together. Sand that down and finish with plastic filler aka bondo. The last step of plastic filler is glaze. This is what fills the pin holes left by the previous process.

Then finish the glaze in 320grit, prime, sand the primer and paint.

That was brief I can get more detailed if you want.
 

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Baysailor,

I am curious about your experiences with repair, filler materials, and preparation for painting.

I have done some experiments on a section of a rear clam. I used West System epoxy with cloth etc. to get the basic structural integrity taken care of. I then used epoxy mixed with 407 micro-balloon filler to build up the surface. It worked fine except that it does not seem to be what you can use for the final surface preparation prior to painting, as I had quite a tiny few voids (that may be due to air bubbles?). A filler/primer paint does not seem to be enough to fill these voids. Have you seen this? For the work you did, what materials did you use, particularly for the final finish layer prior to paint?

TIA

Mark
Yes, you are getting air bubbles in your mixture. I get them from time to time, but not very many and not too often. I wonder if you might be mixing too much 407 additive into the epoxy? For a final coat (basically a very thin glazing style coat), I mix it so such that it spreads VERY easily.

As 1981gMachine suggested, a glazing/spot putty will do the trick. You can get small tubes of it pretty much anywhere that basic body repair supplies are sold.
 

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Thanks for the pointers guys, what you stated that makes sense. I will try some more experiments.

Baysailor, I mixed enough 407 to get a "peanut butter" consistency (per West Systems manual). It seemed like a lot of 407 for a given amount of epoxy, but any less and the mix tends to run. Are you using a thinner mix than that ?

Cheers.
 

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Yellow & Baysailer,

The Elise bodywork is made with polyester resin, not epoxy. You should use polyester for any repair would you do as it is easier and a lot faster. You can use epoxy over polyester but never polyester over epoxy!
 

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Yellow & Baysailer,

The Elise bodywork is made with polyester resin, not epoxy. You should use polyester for any repair would you do as it is easier and a lot faster. You can use epoxy over polyester but never polyester over epoxy!
Yes, the Elise body uses a polyester resin. But for repairs, epoxy based resins are better and offer far superior strength over polyester resins even when it comes to repairs bonding with dissimiliar, unkown or already cured materials (polyester in this case). The crosslinking nature (chemical versus mechanical) of the molecules that make up the epoxy resin provide for bonds that are serveral times the strength offered by polyester based resins.

The downsides to epoxy resin is that it is a little harder to work with (require acurate measurements), more costly and are not as UV resistant (a top coat, additive or the like are best for UV protection). Put the UV part is a non-issue in this case since any area that would be exposed to direct sunlight would be painted.

As to the speed to repair, the pot life and cure times are controlled by the type of catalyst used. Many of the epoxy systems available (West System, System 3, etc.) have different catalyst available to allow you to control this. The shelf life of epoxy resin (two to three years) is also better then polyester resin (about 1 year).
 

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Thanks for the pointers guys, what you stated that makes sense. I will try some more experiments.

Baysailor, I mixed enough 407 to get a "peanut butter" consistency (per West Systems manual). It seemed like a lot of 407 for a given amount of epoxy, but any less and the mix tends to run. Are you using a thinner mix than that ?

Cheers.
For build up and forming, mix it to a peanut butter consistency. For the final "skimming", I mix to a more easily spreadable consistency, although not thin enough to run. But using glazing/spot putty for filling imperfections will work just as well and would probably be easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
ttt

If it will help, I can fix this and paint it the same color or a different color. But the price will go up to $1000 firm for it repaired and painted to your color.
 

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Not sure if people need damaged clams, but my buddy (who has done a ton of work on Eliges) has a 'clam graveyard' with about 7 or 8 Elise and Exige clams. Would be good for people who want to mod or Frankenstein.
 
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