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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently purchased a Katana supercharger kit from Sector 111 that I plan to install late this spring after my bum cam is replaced. Interestingly enough I discovered the bad cam because of the planned supercharger install. I wanted to make sure the cam was not worn before I installed the kit. The Elise is still under warranty so this has added an unexpected delay to my project. :(

One of the things I was not particularly thrilled about is the requirement to cut the female fuel injector connectors off of my fuel injection harness. -eek- This is to allow grafting on the pigtails for the RC Engineering injectors included in the kit. I am not a fan of splicing into wiring; it always seems to lead to problems down the road.

So since I have extra time before I can do the install, I decided to see if I could find some crimp on male connector ends that would plug into the original Toyota connectors. This way I would avoid having to chop them off. This way I can crimp these connectors onto the pigtails included in the kit and use them as adaptors between the stock connector harness and the RC Engineering injectors. This allows an easier path back to stock as well. The only draw back is you have to have access to a set of crimpers for the pins which I do.

I searched here at LT and could not find any reference to fuel injector connectors or for that matter what brand of injectors are in the Elise. Knowing this makes it much easier to choose which type of connectors i.e. Denso, Toyota etc. They are Toyota injectors.

I was able to find replacement male and female Toyota style connector sets with crimp-on pins at www-dot-change2e85-dot-com. They are available for $7.49/set of male and female connectors with pins. From looking at the site, it did not appear that you could buy just the male connectors separately but then I did not contact them and ask either.

With shipping, a set of 4 was ~$35.00 much less than replacing a harness somewhere down the road. Shipping was very quick. I ordered them on Tuesday and received them on Friday. A picture of what I received is below.

I just figured I would post this if anyone else was planning on doing a supercharger install or fuel injector swap and does not want to cut off the connectors from the harness.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Dragon, I forgot to mention that they do have silicone ruber weather proof seals.

Dave
 

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Your concern about having to revert wiring in the future is valid of course. But as far as concerns about splicing itself, I have found that with a physical twist of the wires, plus solder, plus a couple inches of heat shrink (they even have self sealing heat shrink) proves to be very resiliant.
 

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Your concern about having to revert wiring in the future is valid of course. But as far as concerns about splicing itself, I have found that with a physical twist of the wires, plus solder, plus a couple inches of heat shrink (they even have self sealing heat shrink) proves to be very resiliant.
My experience with this method of splicing wires has been pretty much as you describe, however it is not the best way according to my aircraft mechanic. You will rarely if ever see a butt splice in an airplane using a soldered connection, and it is almost always done with a crimped anti-vibration butt connector using a special go/no-go type of crimping tool (not the generic ones you find in an auto parts store) . Over the years the aircraft industry has found evidence that soldered connections tend to fail due to being too stiff and mechanical vibration causing the wire strands to break over time. My '47 Bonanza has had many splices done to its wiring (mainly for avionics) over its 62 years in service. I have never had one fail and they have all been done with FAA approved butt connectors and no soldering. Again, I have had very good success in the past on my cars with soldered wire connections, but this is not the best way to attach wires together.
 

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Dan can you post a pic or link to these faa connectors and crimper. I want to see if is what I use. Thanks
I can post a photo, but I need to go to the airport where I keep my crimper and connectors as I don't keep those things at home. The crimper is a design that clicks like a ratchet as you squeeze the handles and will not release until you completely compress the jaws at a predetermined force at which point the mechanism will allow the handles to move apart again. This ensures every crimp is uniform in force and shape. The butt connectors look very similar to the generic ones sold in auto part stores, except they usually have a clear, colorless or pink plastic covering that is shaped to allow more support when crimped around the wire and its insulation. I believe they are clear to allow you to inspect the crimp and make sure the wire is fully inserted. I haven't been out flying for a couple of months now due to the incredibly lousy weather here, but the next time I go to to the airport, I will take a photo and post it here.
 

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You'd likely never have to replace a harness for a changed plug, i sourced the adapters a while ago from one of the E85 companies, they'd sell a premade one too, shinoo has the details on them, i forget the cost.

But you're adding another point of failure, i think its better to change them out, any loose connections could be very harmful indeed, they're not the best quality connectors.

in the unlikely event it gets botched up and the wire ends up being too short, you can easily solder another wire in and there is tonnes of room in the wiring harness, you just have to unwrap it a bit, you only a need 3-5mm of wire to solder another wire onto.

Crimping is usually better than soldering, but only if you're using a faa/milspec or such crimping tool and crimp connectors and you know how to use it, soldering is usually better when its compared to the level of tool, crimp connector and ability most people have available coupled with the same level available to most people for soldering equipment.

The big concern is the solder that wicks its way into the stranded copper that causes a hard piece of wire to meet a flexible piece, thats the point of failure, however you can avoid that point of failure by making sure the connection isn't stressed in that way.

Given all of the electronics meet a solder point at some point along the way, its partly academic.
 

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Can anyone inform me about RC`s injectors part number ???

(looking to replace my Bosch`s injectors)

Thanks
 
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