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Discussion Starter #1
I read the service manual and I think the instructions to remove the gearbox from a G body Turbo Esprit must have been written by someone who wasn't sure which end of a wrench to use...
Question: is it even possible to remove the gearbox without removing the engine with it?

Rich
83 Turbo Esprit #33
 

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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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is it even possible to remove the gearbox without removing the engine with it?
Sure....IF you are lucky.:whistle:

If the transmission input shaft has moved forward and burrowed into the crankshaft, you may not have enough clearance to lift the trans out by itself.
"In theory, it is possible. In practice, you often can't."
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sure....IF you are lucky.:whistle:

If the transmission input shaft has moved forward and burrowed into the crankshaft, you may not have enough clearance to lift the trans out by itself.
"In theory, it is possible. In practice, you often can't."
It finally came out but I had to remove the big caliper mounts and the turbo. It would be a full on nightmare to pull the engine with the gearbox loose.

The input shaft looks ok. I’ll clean everything up (it’s a greasy mess) and replace the rear main and lube the pilot bearing. Then attempt a reinstall.

Thanks Atwell!
 

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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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Don't forget to replace the nylon washer with the input bearing and install a heavy-duty circlip on the input shaft.

Does your input shaft have square shoulders or is it tapered? (Square is better)
 
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Dreaded Prior Owner
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A search will uncover reams of verbage about the Citroen input shaft and it's circlip, but basically the input shaft is spring loaded towards the engine, retained not very well by a circlip against a tapered shoulder. When the circlip fails, the shaft is driven slowly forwards into the crankshaft rear flange, slowed only by a nylon washer at the pilot bearing. after the washer fails, the shaft's splines can machine a recess into the flange. Not sure if the pilot bearing has to fail for this to happen, or if it just slides forward. Later models had ball bearings rather than needle bearings in the crank flange which took care of the problem. If yours has been retrofitted, disregard all the above.

At a minimum, fit a new heavy duty circlip and washer on reassembly. One can machine the older cranks for the newer bearing style if the cranks out.
 

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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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Thanks, snowrx.

Other things to check while the Citroen box is out are crownwheel bearings (output shaft bearings). If your are still the infamous "Polish Bearings" replace them no matter what. Harry Martens or JAE sells the 'good stuff' (Timken, IIRC).
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the replies. I assume you have to remove the top cover on the gearbox to access the input shaft circlip? Or do you have to dismantle the box? Also: the nylon thrust washer is missing on my car and I have to assume it hasn't been there forever. #33 has >80,000 miles on it and some of those were racetrack miles. Should I buy a nylon thrust washer or just fab one from Delrin or some such?

Thanks for all the help!

Rich
#33
 

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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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The circlip comes out from the bell housing end.
 

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The ultimate upgrade/repair is to machine the crankshaft and install a larger bearing that can take the thrust and not allow the input shaft to damage the crankshaft. If you can't find anyone who can do that "in situ" it requires removing the motor and disassembling it so the crank can go to a machine shop. Big job. Short of that is the tougher circlip and a new nylotron washer. This starts you on an expensive "slippery slope" of things to do while you are in there. An example is the fuel tanks. They rot and then leak. Very common. Then there is the water pump, belts, hoses, cam gears, spark plugs, and the list goes on. Depends on your plans for the car and how much time and money you have to spend. With 80,000 miles on the car it probably needs the turbo to be rebuilt. Best to buy your parts so you know they are correct. You should be replacing the clutch and throwout bearing anyway unless it was done recently. The cost for the washer and circlip are minor compared to all the labor and the clutch.
David Teitelbaum
 

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Here's the diagram I annotated from the manual from my late 88 Esprit in 2014.
Note the picture inserts: left is a chewed up circlip (get a heavy duty version from JAE) and on the right is a partially chewed up Nylatron (tm) plastic washer. I didn't go the expensive ball bearing maching route as I caught it early. It sounds like you might be able to get away if no damage to your crank yet.

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