The Lotus Cars Community banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been contemplating picking Ardent Red as the color for my Elise, but I was concerned that it would be too deep of a shade for my liking. I was hoping it was close to Porsche Guards Red. Well, I went down to my local automotive paint supply shop [a place where I frequent] and located the factory paint codes for Lotus, and had them mix me a few ounces. Now I can spray a test panel to give me a better Idea of the true color. I held the Ardent Red up to the Guards Red and my initial impression is that it's pretty close to Guards Red but a shade or two darker. So far I like.
There were tons of colors in the Lotus line....I wonder....maybe...Azure Blue:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
I have owned a Guards Red Porsche, and was always concerned it was too orange in tint. I like the Ardent Red in pictures much better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
Re: blue blues

Jay said:
so why do you think they dropped the interesting lighter blue colors like magnetic, azure, or ice?
Actually, magnetic blue is going to be available (one of the "Lifestyle colours") - but the photos I've seen make it out to be more of a medium blue than a light blue. See here: Mag Blue Photo

But I agree that Ice Blue would be hot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,970 Posts
Re: blue blues

Jay said:
so why do you think they dropped the interesting lighter blue colors like magnetic, azure, or ice? ....
Probably a marketing decision based on American tastes in colors. Take a look in a large parking lot sometime. After returning from a couple of weeks in England, I suddenly realized that if it weren't for the Volkswagon New Beetle, we wouldn't have any light/bright colors at all!

About half of the cars I see are either black or some shade of blue or green so dark they're difficult to tell from black at a distance. The rest are somewhat evenly divided between silver, "gold" that's almost silver, white, gray and red (often very dark or Burgandy). The occasional yellow car is a visual relief.

For dull/boring, check out the color chart for the Lexus ES300. They had three (!) shades of a silver/gold/platinum color along with black and white.

The European interiors were also much more colorful. Often two-tone, but tasteful, like the Euro Elise pictures we've all seen. It's hard to get anything but black here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I was reading some info put out by Dupont, and they said that black was actually more popular in Europe. I believe silver was tops over here. These were for all cars, not the Lotus.
Dupont also predicts that reds are going to gain popularity again with new metalics and pearl effects this time around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
751 Posts
Actually the car that was posted above is Lazer Blue. That is the color I wish I could get.

If you ask me, both blues we are getting are pretty dark. They should drop one and opt for a lighter blue. ...like lazer.

-Whit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
fyi....Here's one person's take on colors, followed by some stats.

Yes, there is a reason it seems that all new cars are silver. And they will get hit by some clown in white or silver SUV that's on a cell phone.

Note that yellow and orange (chrome orange) are rising stars.

Top 10 car colors (and why we choose them)
By Larry Getlen • Bankrate.com

Top car colors
in North America

Top car colors
in North America

1. Silver
2. Black
3. White ...not an option
4. Red
5. Blue
6. Green
7. Gray
8. Beige
9. Gold
10. Bronze



New York restaurant manager Kathleen Delaney bought her 2002 Audi all-road Quattro because she finds Audi's shade of green unlike any other on an automobile today -- and, she finds it calming.

Austin-based filmmaker Christine Irons bought her green Suzuki Sidekick because, due to its color and shape, it reminded her of a frog. She would not have purchased that car in any other color, and she affectionately refers to the car as "Frog."

Los Angeles stand-up comedian Mishna Wolff bought a white 1984 Pontiac Fiero with a two-tone brown bottom just last week, after rejecting red and blue options outright, because she considers it "the grooviest thing I'd ever seen."


Speaking to car buyers, regardless of age, occupation or geography, indicates that the color of their cars is more than just a matter of basic aesthetics: It's a deeply personal and emotional decision that can reveal as much about the person as about the car. In fact, Yankelovich and Partners, a marketing consultancy specializing in lifestyle trends and customer targeting solutions, has reported that as many as 40 percent of customers would switch car brands if unable to get the car color they desire.

At times, though, consumers are uncomfortable admitting the obvious. New York comedian Moody McCarthy bought a used, silver Honda Civic last year, and notes that, "it's a funny point of the phone chat with the seller, after we've both spent five minutes pretending to know the importance of timing belts, to ask, 'Oh, and what color is it?'"

Silver takes the crown
Trends in car colors have changed over the years, but one undeniable trend of the past few years has been the power of silver, the most popular car color in the world. According to J.D. Power and Associates, over 22 percent of cars purchased in the United States were silver, a figure slightly higher than previous years, and the sleek shade also led the pack in Asia and Europe.

The power of color
While no one is certain why silver has achieved such mysterious and sudden dominance, some hypothesize that silver, much like black, conveys power and authority, and now that baby boomers are the generation of power, silver illustrates how far they have come.

"Silver seems to be the new white," says Karl Brauer, Editor-In-Chief of Edmunds.com. "White has been extremely popular for many years, in sharp contrast to the long-standing popularity of black that dates back to the beginning of automotive history."

Ever since the days when black, the only color offered on the Model-T, was dominant, car color has been a strong signifier of personal standing and self-assessment. But, of course, the significance of color extends way beyond the invention of the automobile.

According to professional color therapist Valerie Logan-Clarke, the pigments used to dye fabrics violet or purple in Roman times were very expensive, and were therefore only available to the wealthy. So Romans in high office would wear purple robes, indicating power, nobility and authority.

Logan-Clarke also notes how every color has positive and negative attributes. Silver can relate to "feelings of superiority" and "great mental powers."

Green, meanwhile, is seen as relating to the heart, and could signify excessive generosity and sympathy, or, on the other hand, possessiveness and, in accordance with the oft-heard phrase "green-eyed monster," jealousy. So, if one were to meet a potential suitor with a green car, one might be headed for a relationship full of unbridled love and understanding, or one may sink into a tunnel of neediness and despair.

Color also can signify our relationship to the world, both as individuals and as a society. Renee Brodie is the author of two books on color therapy, "The Healing Tones of Crystal Bowls: Heal Yourself with Colour and Sound" and "Let Light into your Heart with Colour and Sound."

According to Brodie, exotic colors were favored by wealthy carriage owners in the pre-automobile days. But when the auto emerged, colors were drab, as manufacturers offered few choices. It was only when the automobile became more commonplace and people became more comfortable with the idea of them that individuality emerged and a car's color became a reflection of its owner.

"As cars became commonplace and affordable by all," says Brodie, "the individuality and ego emerged, and cars became a status symbol to reflect the personality and lifestyle of the owner. Those who wanted to be seen were drawn to brighter colors without actual knowledge of the meaning of color, but it made them feel good."

Orange you glad you can choose banana?
Car color can signify more than status or personal quirks, however. Brodie notes that the ever-popular black reflects a desire to remain hidden from the world.

The exact opposite of this, however, is noted in the growing reemergence on production lines of colors such as orange and yellow, colors which have not yet cracked the top 10, but which some automakers note are growing in customer desirability. DaimlerChrysler, Ford and GM are all increasing their offerings of orange for 2003 models.

Also, while traditional power colors like silver and black dominate, even those colors are being given new twists, with DaimerChrysler offering increased variations on silver in 2003, including tinting it with green or blue.

While the shift away from reds and blues would seem to signal a move away from flamboyance, such visual extravagance is merely changing in nature, with wider variations of traditional colors being requested by consumers.

"Today's colors have much more special effects than 10 to 30 years ago," says Jason Hiselman, Research and Development Manager for mobile airbrush touch-up company Carnica Inc. "Our technicians used to be able to match all factory finishes with just a few different tints. But now, there are so many new pearl flakes, antique finishes and mica colors that many new tints are needed for a correct match."

So, with such variation on the uptick, what is one to infer about the popularity of car colors? Is the dominance of silver and black a sign that people simply want prestige and respect? Or does the re-emergence of yellow and orange, and the abundance of choices in the variety of tints and shades, signal that people are more complex than that?

The only sure answer is that the color of the car you drive may tell people more about you than you ever intended.

Larry Getlen is a freelance journalist and comedian in New York.
Enjoy his frivolity at http://www.zhet.blogspot.com.


-- Posted: Oct. 1, 2002

from:
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0855652.html

Most Popular Car Colors, 2001–2002
(Percentage of vehicles manufactured during 2002 model year in North America)
Luxury 2002 2001
1. Silver 32.1% 18.4%
2. White Met. 17.7 n.a.
3. White 11.8 9.0
4. Med./Dk. Blue 8.6 9.4
5. Black 8.5 11.1
6. Med./Dk. Gray 7.2 n.a.
7. Med. Red 6.0 6.0
8. Gold 3.0 5.4
9. Med./Dk. Green 1.8 3.1
10. Lt. Brown 1.7 n.a.

Sport/Compact 2002 2001
1. Silver 24.6% 25.4%
2. Black 14.3 14.5
3. Med./Dk. Blue 12.9 11.3
4. White 8.8 9.8
5. Bright Red 6.9 5.3
6. Med./Dk. Gray 6.7 2.0
7. Med. Red 5.5 7.4
8. Lt. Brown 4.3 6.2
9. Gold 4.1 n.a.
10. Dk. Red 2.6 2.6

Full/Intermediate 2002 2001
1. Silver 28.1% 24.9%
2. White 11.8 14.1
3. Lt. Brown 11.6 8.1
4. Black 11.2 9.8
5. Med./Dk. Blue 9.5 8.9
6. Med. Red 7.6 4.8
7. Med./Dk. Gray 6.2 n.a.
8. Med./Dk. Green 5.3 10.0
9. Gold 3.4 7.2
10. Dk. Red 2.6 4.9

SUV/Truck/Van 2002 2001
1. White 19.3% 19.6%
2. Silver 18.0 17.8
3. Black 12.4 11.2
4. Med./Dk. Blue 11.4 10.4
5. Med/Dk. Gray 7.5 2.5
6. Med. Red 7.1 8.4
7. Med./Dk. Green 6.7 7.4
8. Lt. Brown 5.1 4.6
9. Bright Red 4.5 5.3
10. Gold 4.5 3.8
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,315 Posts
Phew! Thanks for the informative post Jay.
They don't seem to approach anything from an engineers (like me) point of view.
1. Dark colours get very hot very quickly.
2. Metallic colours a very hard to "touch up" with a small bottle of paint.
3. Light colours "look" clean even when they are not (with the exception of white).
4. If you want to be "seen" by other road users (including those who aren't paying enough attention). Choose an unusual bright colour.

These were the choices for my last purchase. I went with yellow and it was surprising to me that drivers paid more attention to me than my previous bright red car. The perception to me results as drivers being more courteous.
After saying all this though I am breaking rule 2 this time ;) I figure I will get the clams resprayed when they get sufficinet stone chips to warrant it. I have thought about the stone guard plastic but I reallt don't like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,802 Posts
INteresting info, I'm really surprised red was so far down the list. What with everyone always saying resale red.

Oh well, I guess I'll be in the small percentage with ardent red.
Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
brookester said:
... I held the Ardent Red up to the Guards Red and my initial impression is that it's pretty close to Guards Red but a shade or two darker. So far I like. ...
So, do you think this is close to the Amulet Red from the Audi TT? Have you had the opportunity to make that comparison?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
brookester said:
I haven't compared the two, but I think the Amulet red is darker.
Thanks, that's what I expected.

Cheers.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top