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Discussion Starter #1
I've read horror stories about heater resistor pack failure on the Elise, requiring the front clam to be removed for replacement etc.
The thing is, the heater still works fine on my low mileage 2005 Elise S2 (Rover engine, aircon) probably because the previous owner never took it out in the rain.

My question is, I know it can't be removed/replaced, but can I access this resistor pack to perhaps pull off the electrical connectors from it and spray electrical contact cleaner or similar onto the connections? It may help prevent failure, as I cannot leave the car in the garage just because it's raining or I would hardly use it.

Where is it actually located, is it somewhere under the radiator?
 

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If its anything like the us car you cant do anything to the conections without taking half the car apart, unfortunately.

You should make sure the drainage holes have been drilled.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks for the reply.

How do I make sure the drainage holes have been drilled? Do I have to take the front clam off to do that too or can I check for/drill the holes with it in place?
 

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To reach the fan resistor pack the complete front HVAC system has to be removed, which means removing the clam. Here is the TSB for the drain holes.
Michael
 

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perhaps pull off the electrical connectors from it and spray electrical contact cleaner or similar onto the connections?
The problem is not with the connectors, it's with the actual resistor - they are exposed and corrode and short out to each other. The OEM replacement resistor pack (and the one installed on newer cars) is sealed up and not susceptible to water corrosion.
Where is it actually located, is it somewhere under the radiator?
Yes, it's under the radiator - so essentially you have to remove the clam and the radiator (and the AC radiator) to get to the resistor pack. If you are going to go to that trouble, you might as well replace it with the new pack. I'd wait until it actually goes bad, or until I had to remove the radiator to do the job - you may never actually have any trouble with it.

I would however, drill the drain holes as indicated in the Service Bulletin. But first, make sure that bulletin applies to the Rover engined S2, and not just the Toyota engined S2.
 

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The problem is not with the connectors, it's with the actual resistor - they are exposed and corrode and short out to each other. The OEM replacement resistor pack (and the one installed on newer cars) is sealed up and not susceptible to water corrosion.
Yes, it's under the radiator - so essentially you have to remove the clam and the radiator (and the AC radiator) to get to the resistor pack. If you are going to go to that trouble, you might as well replace it with the new pack. I'd wait until it actually goes bad, or until I had to remove the radiator to do the job - you may never actually have any trouble with it.

I would however, drill the drain holes as indicated in the Service Bulletin. But first, make sure that bulletin applies to the Rover engined S2, and not just the Toyota engined S2.
Actually, Tim, I don't believe the radiator or condenser need to be removed.
Michael
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the advice everybody.
Looking at the service bulletin above it does say "post 2002 cars with the face level vents" so I got my car out of the garage today and drilled these 4 drain holes, only took 15 minutes.
Hopefully it might make the resistor pack last longer, so I will just forget about it now.
 

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Technical Service Bulletin for AC resister pack drain holes

Bump for future reference.

Technical Service Bulletin for AC resister pack drain holes.

I keep losing this...
 
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