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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought I had the standard window rattle on my passenger door, but upon cleaning yesterday I noticed it's something much worse. The door panel is separating and rattling as I drive... Is this a common problem? Any recommendations on a DIY fix?

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
maybe sikaflex or silicon sealer.
Not familiar with sikaflex. But I never thought of silicon. I might try that. I attempted to crazy glue it this afternoon as a quick fix still drying so I don't know if it's worked yet.


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As an Esprit guy, I don't have an Elise/Exige (soon!), but if that happened to me, I'd seriously consider using 3M Panel Body Adhesive with a bunch of good clamps to hold it together until it dries. I've done quite a bit of fiberglass work over the years so I'd also be seriously tempted just to mix up some fiberglass resin as simple, inexpensive, and even more permanent alternative. Just be careful with it and don't let it run anywhere on the body that you don't want it to be.

Here's a nice little video for the 3M Body Adhesive:


As for the fiberglass resin, you can get it inexpensively at any local car parts store or outlet.
 

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Hoping the Crazy Glue works, but from my own personal experience over the years, I doubt it. Do it once, do it right...you'll be much happier in the long run :)
+1

also something inadequate, that has to be removed to do a proper repair will often exacerbate the problem.
 

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Wow.......Never seen delamination like that.

To be honest, I would take that to a body shop!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well so far the crazy glue has dried and is working. Taking it out for a good drive tomorrow so we will see how it holds up after a few bumps. So far so good but if not I will definitely look into some of the suggested options. I'm still trying to figure out what would have caused it in the first place....


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Well so far the crazy glue has dried and is working. Taking it out for a good drive tomorrow so we will see how it holds up after a few bumps. So far so good but if not I will definitely look into some of the suggested options. I'm still trying to figure out what would have caused it in the first place....


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Sikaflex is like a black silicon sealer that is used for windows etc.
(I think it is an Eu product)
Things like the crash structure on the front of the car.
It sticks like **** to a blanket.

For epoxy based products it is best to use epoxy.
Maybe some "west systems"?, but just about any would likely work.
 

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Drivers door on my Elise was rattling with the window up at speed and I discovered some delamination at the bottom center of the door. I will add that to the repair list when I take it in for service.
 

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The term "Crazy Glue" is often used as a generic reference to cyanoacrylate ester (CA). This adhesive is available in viscosities that vary from thinner than water to thick as honey. The thicker versions are advertised as gap-filling. CA is brittle and best used in sheer because it has poor peel strength. CA degrades over time and after approximately 25 years has half its original strength. If you use a thinner-than-water CA in an application that fails, subsequent attempts to re-bond the materials may require arduous effort to remove the brittle CA that wicked everywhere. Failure to remove the CA in a failed joint means subsequent adhesives will bond to the brittle CA and not the (usually) much stronger base material.

When epoxy is used to join fiberglass panels in a production environment, a filler like phenolic resin, glass beads or chopped fiber is often used to ensure that no voids are left in the joint. If you decide to buy resin at an auto parts store (not recommended for several reasons), make sure you are getting epoxy resin and not the more brittle polyester resin that is often sold there. Polyester resin kits will come with a very small bottle of water-thin catalyst, while epoxy resin is typically provided in two viscous parts mixed in a 1:1 (or other) ratio.

@Tcab, it is difficult to tell from your picture whether two separate pieces of fiberglass failed at an adhesive joint or whether the fibers of a single part have delaminated. A delamination would likely be best repaired with epoxy resin, while a failed adhesive joint would more likely be best repaired with an elastic adhesive like Sikaflex. A flexible adhesive is very likely to survive repeated shocks without failure. Note that Sikaflex is neither silicon (a very hard and brittle element) nor silicone, but a polyurethane adhesive.
 

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Sikaflex is like a black silicon sealer that is used for windows etc.
(I think it is an Eu product)
Things like the crash structure on the front of the car.
It sticks like **** to a blanket.

For epoxy based products it is best to use epoxy.
Maybe some "west systems"?, but just about any would likely work.
Sikaflex is actually a polyurethane adhesive, not a silicone sealer. It is used as a construction adhesive for fiberglass, and is very similar to what Lotus uses to adhere body parts on the Evora. I would also recommend Sikaflex for this kind of delamination!
 
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