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Discussion Starter #1
Something isnt quite right with my 07 shifter. My 05 shifted a bit smoother and it had way more miles. The shifter doesnt really grind the syncros. It just feels really rough and often hangs up on the gates. There is alot of reluctance to go into gear at times.

Would a new shift cable solve this or can I adjust my old one? I couldent find any info here on adjustment methodology for the cable. I havent done any shifter re-enforcment (stans mod or the sector kit), but I can do that as well. I think the problem is a bit more systemic than that though. I have changed the fluid in the tranny which helped a bit.

Any advice on where to look first? I know it will never shift like an s2k, but I know there is room for improvement.



I have read most of the threads here on the subject I think, so I did some of my dillegence.


Thanks

Aaron
 

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The first solution I was gong to offer before I read your post was to change to the Redline fluid cocktail that Sector 111 uses, as the fluid can have a noticeable difference on the shifter. But since you got some benefit from new fluid, it doesn't sound like that would do the trick. The reinforcement that i did (and I think both basically do the same thing), does little more than position the shifter more securely so you have less slop. But that doesn't sound like your problem either. It may be a matter of adjusting and lubing your linkage.

Unfortunately there seems to be a fair amount of variation between cars on how they shift. Mine is an '05 with the fluid and S111 reinforcement and it shifts very well, smooth and positive. I've certainly seen much worse. OTOH, they don't seem to take well to abuse, and a few herky jerky forced shifts could bend a fork or get the linkage out of kilter. Was yours used?
 

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Things that improve shifting feel:
1) Proper adjustment of the crossgate cable.
2) Reinforcement of the shifter mount ("Stan" mod and/or "Sector" mod).
3) Stiffer front and rear engine mounts.
4) Improved shifter cable (i.e SSC cable).
5) Spherical rod ends at the end of the cables instead of "ball and socket" joints.
6) Improved lubricant (Redline, Motul, various "elixirs")

The order of listing is not intended to be significant.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The first solution I was gong to offer before I read your post was to change to the Redline fluid cocktail that Sector 111 uses, as the fluid can have a noticeable difference on the shifter. But since you got some benefit from new fluid, it doesn't sound like that would do the trick. The reinforcement that i did (and I think both basically do the same thing), does little more than position the shifter more securely so you have less slop. But that doesn't sound like your problem either. It may be a matter of adjusting and lubing your linkage.

Unfortunately there seems to be a fair amount of variation between cars on how they shift. Mine is an '05 with the fluid and S111 reinforcement and it shifts very well, smooth and positive. I've certainly seen much worse. OTOH, they don't seem to take well to abuse, and a few herky jerky forced shifts could bend a fork or get the linkage out of kilter. Was yours used?
Yeah used but pristne condition and low miles. My elise on the other hand wasnt abused but had several track days and some hard driving and was better. I dont think anything is broken. I think it is more of an adjustment and tuning issue, it feels rough even between the gates.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Things that improve shifting feel:
1) Proper adjustment of the crossgate cable.
2) Reinforcement of the shifter mount ("Stan" mod and/or "Sector" mod).
3) Stiffer front and rear engine mounts.
4) Improved shifter cable (i.e SSC cable).
5) Spherical rod ends at the end of the cables instead of "ball and socket" joints.
6) Improved lubricant (Redline, Motul, various "elixirs")

The order of listing is not intended to be significant.
Thanks. I have done 3 and 6. I could do 2 pretty easily of course. I think 1 and/or 4 might be my issue. I searched shifter cable adjustment and didnt come up with any methodology on that. Any advice or do I need to search better.

THankd,
AAron
 

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Thanks. I have done 3 and 6. I could do 2 pretty easily of course. I think 1 and/or 4 might be my issue. I searched shifter cable adjustment and didnt come up with any methodology on that. Any advice or do I need to search better.

THankd,
AAron
The cable adjustment is fairly straightforward. With the center console removed and the transmission in neutral, disconnect the crossgate cable from the shifter linkage. The stud coming off the rod-end ball joint (or if you have a spherical rod-end, the center of the rod-end) should be directly even with the mounting hole in the shifter linkage when the shifter is the "center" position (no load on the crossgate springs). If it is ahead or behind the mounting hole, you have to adjust the rod-end by loosening the lock nut on the cable and rotating the rod-end in full turns to make it even.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
apk919 is cooler than steve mcqueen riding a unicorn. THanks!
 

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The cable adjustment is fairly straightforward. With the center console removed and the transmission in neutral, disconnect the crossgate cable from the shifter linkage. The stud coming off the rod-end ball joint (or if you have a spherical rod-end, the center of the rod-end) should be directly even with the mounting hole in the shifter linkage when the shifter is the "center" position (no load on the crossgate springs). If it is ahead or behind the mounting hole, you have to adjust the rod-end by loosening the lock nut on the cable and rotating the rod-end in full turns to make it even.
Bumping this as I think it will solve my dilemma.

Can't do this tomorrow as I'll be drunk at the Bears game, but hope to tackle it Monday AM before work (gonna be 65 in Chicago and I want to drive!!).

A few questions:

- Removing the ball end (cable side) from stud - any advice? Just pry it out with a screwdriver perhaps.

- Once the cable rod end is removed (using 10mm wrenches), I adjust a few full turns, and retighten (Easy).

- To reinstall the cable rod end (female) to the rod (male) - what do I do? Just pry it on? Will it pop on or will it need some force?

- When you say 'the mounting hole', to what are you referring? I'm assuming you are referring the hole on the gear lever mounting frame? If you look at the pic below, it's the hole that's basically lining up with the reverse stop pin - or specifically the picture, it's the hole that's directly about the 'rs' on the 'reverse gate stop arm' label - correct?

Sorry for dumb questions - but I want to make sure I do this 100% correct and avoid any shop costs.

Is it common for the crossgate cable to come out of whack? I must admit that in traffic or at redlights, I might jiggle the shifter around - sort of a drumming on the table nervous energy kinda thing.

 

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Use a 10mm open ended spanner to prise it off and just press it back on.

What apk919 means is that with the cable sitting in the abutment block in the shifter frame (abutment block not shown in your diagram), ie with the outer cable still held and with the inner cable freed from the gearshift lever, see if the centre of the rod end on the end of the inner cable lines up with the pin on the gear lever with the lever in neutral. If not in line then adjust it.

It is not common for this to get out of whack. Maybe was not installed correctly or there is a problem with the guide sleeve at the gearbox end or the outer cable has become separated at the hub at the gearbox end. Have a close look and feel - Crossgate cable is the right hand one at the gearbox end.

When I say feel, I mean give the concertina rubber section a good press to see if it feels that all is ok as the guide sleeve is inside it, and have a feel of the outer cable at the diecast hub at the gearbox mounting bracket to ensure that the outer cable is firmly held in the hub. The guide sleeve is the most common area of failure.
 
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