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The negative impact of higher gas prices is obvious...but there are some positive effects ...

A new report by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) finds that Americans have been driving less since November 2007, and that vehicle miles travelled on all U.S. public roads fell by 4.3 per cent in March 2008, when compared to March 2007. That marks the first time that U.S. travel has fallen in March since 1979, and is also the sharpest yearly drop for any month in the history of the FHWA, which has produced its monthly Traffic Volume Trends since 1942.

The U.S. Department of Transportation estimates that greenhouse gas emissions fell by an estimated 9 million metric tons for the first quarter of 2008.

Less driving not only can lead to less fuel consumption and less pollution but also less traffic, fewer accidents...this not only benefits us directly, but also benefits auto insurers...in theory this could get passed on to the public in lower premiums (I'll believe that when I see it though)..... (MarketBeat : Who Benefits From Higher Gas Prices? Auto Insurers.)


More people are choosing to use mass transit or alternative means of transportation.....(personally I have noticed the train I take to NYC every day has gotten significantly more crowded over the past few months) .....Even bicycle sales are up...

People are trading in their big SUVs for more fuel efficient cars.. Honda sales are up....US sales of the Prius jumped by nearly 70 per cent last month...In April, GM reported its truck and SUV sales were down 27 percent, but it had its best-ever month in hybrid and crossover sales.

According to Automotive News : "Ford Motor Co. is undergoing wrenching production changes -- fewer trucks, a lot more cars -- to become a little bit more like Honda. Last week, Ford announced plans to slash truck production while boosting output of the Ford Focus and Fusion, and also the Mercury Milan."

So while it may be painful in the short term, our country may benefit in the long term:up:
 

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Biggest silver lining: larger CVX profits.

xtn
 

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Discussion Starter #6
and my FSLR was great until today :(
 

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As well at the Geo Metro that sold for $6K a couple days ago.
The market for not just new but also used fuel efficient cars has taken off...I know at my family's Honda dealership, they sold over 100 cars this past weekend, many of which were used Hondas....at the same time, you could steal a used Escalade or other big SUV if you wanted one right now.....
 

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More people are choosing to use mass transit or alternative means of transportation.....(personally I have noticed the train I take to NYC every day has gotten significantly more crowded over the past few months) .....Even bicycle sales are up...

People are trading in their big SUVs for more fuel efficient cars.. Honda sales are up....US sales of the Prius jumped by nearly 70 per cent last month...In April, GM reported its truck and SUV sales were down 27 percent, but it had its best-ever month in hybrid and crossover sales.

According to Automotive News : "Ford Motor Co. is undergoing wrenching production changes -- fewer trucks, a lot more cars -- to become a little bit more like Honda. Last week, Ford announced plans to slash truck production while boosting output of the Ford Focus and Fusion, and also the Mercury Milan."

So while it may be painful in the short term, our country may benefit in the long term:up:
(These comments are directed at people in general, not the OP.)

It's no surprise that the media has to tell everyone about this. People have such a short memory. The exact same thing happened 30 years ago. Middle east trouble, gas prices shoot up, people go ' :panic: ' and start buying small cars (the rise of Japanese autos in the USA), gas prices decline. It's a cycle.

It will take about another 8-10 years before gas prices come down, if history is any gauge. Then people will start buying big, heavy, gas hungry cars again and it will start all over.
 

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So, the prices of fuel efficient, small sports cars should be going up too, right? Heh... :rolleyes:
 

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First I'll say I've been enjoying driving a car with exotic performance levels which still nets me 22-25mpg in the city (I love my Exige S!)

But I have to disagree with the funamental point of the article summary in the OP... Sure, higher gas prices = less driving = less pollution/accidents, etc. But, that's one heck of a band-aid approach. We shouldn't have to drive less. The obvious answer (and one that mftr's will be striving towards much more seriously now) is to have cleaner cars that we can drive as much as we want. We need smaller cars that create less congestion. And better driver's education programs that lead to less accidents (and also less congestion...avoiding the ripple effect, etc.).

The truth is that reduced driving = reduced commerce = suffering economy. That's not the approach want to take.

A few Euro-quality rail systems in this country would be fantastic. I'll take a snack car and a giant seat with a TV any day over the sub-standard offerings from our airlines any day. And it would solve many of these problems (less accidents, less congestion on roads, less pollution from automobiles, etc.).
 

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A few Euro-quality rail systems in this country would be fantastic. I'll take a snack car and a giant seat with a TV any day over the sub-standard offerings from our airlines any day. And it would solve many of these problems (less accidents, less congestion on roads, less pollution from automobiles, etc.).
Totally agree 100%. Unfortunately, the stigma of PT (public trans) as being "for the loosers" is ingrained so deeply, there is no way: A) it would ever be funded; B) Even if it was, not enough people would use it.

PT needs a HUGE ad campaign focused on losing that stigma. It will take one hellofa good ad agency, though.
 

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Less driving not only can lead to less fuel consumption and less pollution but also less traffic, fewer accidents

...

People are trading in their big SUVs for more fuel efficient cars
^^^ My favorite two by-products of more expensive gas. I'm laughing since I ride my motorcycle most days and am all too glad to see "status use only" SUV's disappearing from our roads/highways.

I wonder how motorcycle sales are doing? :D
 

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^^^ My favorite two by-products of more expensive gas. I'm laughing since I ride my motorcycle most days and am all too glad to see "status use only" SUV's disappearing from our roads/highways.

I wonder how motorcycle sales are doing? :D
My neighbor's motorcycle sat for years in the garage with only occassional use. But this year, since turning warm the past couple of months, he has used it almost every day for his commute. I bet he has put more miles on it the past few months than he has for the last 4 or 5 years (they have two SUVs).
 

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(These comments are directed at people in general, not the OP.)

It's no surprise that the media has to tell everyone about this. People have such a short memory. The exact same thing happened 30 years ago. Middle east trouble, gas prices shoot up, people go ' :panic: ' and start buying small cars (the rise of Japanese autos in the USA), gas prices decline. .
So, when did we stop buying small Japanese cars? Even the largest SUV today has better gas mileage then the average gas guzzler back then. Just as MANY MANY MANY other Americans I bought "that first" Japanese car (Toyota Corolla) well before the gas crunch "30" years ago, because, 1) it did get better mileage 2) it was built better and lastest longer 3) was less expensive.

If you really do look at history, you will find the trend to buy better Japanese cars, not smaller cars started well before the last gas crunch. American companies had failure after failure (i.e. Gremlin, Pinto, Corvair) trying to enter the small car market, there was no rush like there is now to get rid of your American Gas guzzler. There was no run on the used car market or increase in price of higher mpg cars. Because......Mom Dad and the kids ate their meals together at home, people didn't use disposable income on the lastest computers, cell phones, portable music devices, high end stereo, there were 4 cruise ships in the world, nobody bought $8 coffee every morning, people actually road those long things with a lot of seats on them to work, the average family wasn't quite yet a two car family. You could see the Rolling Stones for $4. A nickle bag was actually $5! There was no fear of other countries (China) increasing their Oil consumption. The reasons for the shortage were different last time, the major reason was the nationalization of the oil companies holdings in Mid-eastern countries.

Other then that, you are correct, it's the exact same thing.
 

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So, when did we stop buying small Japanese cars? Even the largest SUV today has better gas mileage then the average gas guzzler back then. Just as MANY MANY MANY other Americans I bought "that first" Japanese car (Toyota Corolla) well before the gas crunch "30" years ago, because, 1) it did get better mileage 2) it was built better and lastest longer 3) was less expensive.

If you really do look at history, you will find the trend to buy better Japanese cars, not smaller cars started well before the last gas crunch. American companies had failure after failure (i.e. Gremlin, Pinto, Corvair) trying to enter the small car market, there was no rush like there is now to get rid of your American Gas guzzler. There was no run on the used car market or increase in price of higher mpg cars. Because......Mom Dad and the kids ate their meals together at home, people didn't use disposable income on the lastest computers, cell phones, portable music devices, high end stereo, there were 4 cruise ships in the world, nobody bought $8 coffee every morning, people actually road those long things with a lot of seats on them to work, the average family wasn't quite yet a two car family. You could see the Rolling Stones for $4. A nickle bag was actually $5! There was no fear of other countries (China) increasing their Oil consumption. The reasons for the shortage were different last time, the major reason was the nationalization of the oil companies holdings in Mid-eastern countries.

Other then that, you are correct, it's the exact same thing.
Details were different, big picture the same. Yes, better Japanese cars were available and selling before 1977. And quality was another factor. But gasoline demand/use was another major factor. Advertising of gas mileage became a major selling point. Before the mid-70's, it wasn't. Average milage by the mid 80's was significantly lower. Better mileage, less gas used, lower demand, lower prices. Same situation.
 

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The demand from China will increase and so will the demand from India.

We will most likely see $200 per barrel sometimes this year or next (I hope I am wrong)

But even at $4.0 per gallon gas is cheap compared to most other countries

In Sweden the cost is around $9.0 per gallon with the current exchange rate.
 

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The negative impact of higher gas prices is obvious...but there are some positive effects ...

A new report by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) finds that Americans have been driving less since November 2007, and that vehicle miles travelled on all U.S. public roads fell by 4.3 per cent in March 2008, when compared to March 2007. That marks the first time that U.S. travel has fallen in March since 1979, and is also the sharpest yearly drop for any month in the history of the FHWA, which has produced its monthly Traffic Volume Trends since 1942.

The U.S. Department of Transportation estimates that greenhouse gas emissions fell by an estimated 9 million metric tons for the first quarter of 2008.

Less driving not only can lead to less fuel consumption and less pollution but also less traffic, fewer accidents...this not only benefits us directly, but also benefits auto insurers...in theory this could get passed on to the public in lower premiums (I'll believe that when I see it though)..... (MarketBeat : Who Benefits From Higher Gas Prices? Auto Insurers.)


More people are choosing to use mass transit or alternative means of transportation.....(personally I have noticed the train I take to NYC every day has gotten significantly more crowded over the past few months) .....Even bicycle sales are up...

People are trading in their big SUVs for more fuel efficient cars.. Honda sales are up....US sales of the Prius jumped by nearly 70 per cent last month...In April, GM reported its truck and SUV sales were down 27 percent, but it had its best-ever month in hybrid and crossover sales.

According to Automotive News : "Ford Motor Co. is undergoing wrenching production changes -- fewer trucks, a lot more cars -- to become a little bit more like Honda. Last week, Ford announced plans to slash truck production while boosting output of the Ford Focus and Fusion, and also the Mercury Milan."

So while it may be painful in the short term, our country may benefit in the long term:up:
Insane.
 
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