The Lotus Cars Community banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all! Hope you can maybe think of something I haven't.

The Story (i'll keep it short):

I moved from TX to California about a month ago. Before I moved I brought my car to my local lotus dealer to put in a brand new battery. I physically and visually checked all the connections before taking the car back. Fast forward 4 weeks later. I'm in california the car is running good no problems starts and stops without a hitch. I run the car every single weekend for fun and to keep the battery in fresh.

My alarm has been kept OFF. I get in the car try the key and nothing. I mean completely dead as if the car does not even have a battery connected to it. No LED flash from the speedo no interior light, nothing.. Not a single noise. So it's either a bad battery? Or bad cables hooked to the battery? I checked them and they are on the terminals. I was going to yank the battery out (any instructions?) and bring it in for a test, but even a dead battery should at least show SOME kind of life. Can it be anything else? I'm scratching my head here. It could be the alternator, but even then there should be some kind of life from the battery especially since it drove fine 7-days earlier. Is there a fuse I can check or anything else I should try or look into? Never had a problem with the car before it's been running like a clock.

Thanks so much guys, I really need some advice! :wallbang:

Additional: (Thank you mr2 for reminding me) Battery was not on a tender, No accessories were on in the car. No lights were on when I left the car. It's a 2005 Elise.

I have AAA I was wondering if I should try and jump it. If it's a bad battery though that might not be such a good idea. I can maybe pickup a charger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
974 Posts
So the last time you drove it was 7 days ago? Do you use a battery tender? Any accessories that could be left on? Was the domelight left in the on position? Elise/Exige?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Don't take anything off before doing these....
1. Check your battery voltage with a multimeter to see if you the battery is completely dead. It should show 12V or higher if the battery is good.

2. If the battery is ok, then check your battery connections and something else. If the battery is completely dead (multimeter shows very low voltage), charge the battery up with a plug-in battery charger.

3. Try to start the car after the battery is charged. If the car starts, check the battery voltage again with the multimeter when the engine is running to see if your alternator is working. With the alternator, you should read ~14V. If the multimeter still reads ~12V, your alternator is dead.

Good luck...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
:bow:I love you guys! I will pick up a meter after work today! Thank you!

My only issue is how can a brand new battery die(completely) in 7 days with the car not being armed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,246 Posts
Might also be the fact that your car is not happy about the move from TX to CA....Just saying! :)
Seriously. Okay, no tongue in cheek jokes about your vehicle's right leaning tendencies and its forced moved. :crazyeyes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,601 Posts
Some of the Elises & Exiges experience quite a large amperage draw, even with your car parked and the alarm turned off. It is one of the reasons that Chimera integrated the low voltage cutoff feature into its RBS battery. If you aren't using a cutoff switch or a battery tender, it is a cr*pshoot whether the car will start after it is left alone for more than a few days.

On a related note, the smaller ATV-style batteries (Odyssey PC680, et al) take a harder hit each time you start your car (they "age" quickly because they are doing more work per start than they were designed to do). My PC680 on an S220 Exige would last about 5 days between drives when the battery was new, but after about a year it had gone down to a day or two before the battery would be flat. It is like a 100 lb guy working as a piano mover... he can probably do a few jobs, but he is getting tired and hurt each time and eventually he can't lift the piano any more. That's the tradeoff of using small ATV / motorcycle batteries, they don't last long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,601 Posts
In ** very rough terms **, apples to apples (say lead acid battery versus lead acid battery of a smaller size), the smaller the battery, the greater the discharge each time you start the car (one cycle). The greater the depth of discharge, the fewer the # of cycles the battery will be able to perform in its useful life.

In a nutshell, too small of a battery requires the battery to work harder than it was intended, and the life of the battery suffers. Again, roughly speaking, a battery 1/2 the size of the original will have less than 1/2 the life span for a given # of car starts.

There is a reason that ATV's get tiny batteries and cars get larger batteries: if you want the battery to last, it needs enough muscle to start your car without enduring a great DOD. An ATV battery can start your car, but it is "damaged" a bit each time that it does, until it will no longer start your car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
... Before I moved I brought my car to my local lotus dealer to put in a brand new battery. ...
What type, make and model was the battery? If it is a standard car battery, then it may just be defective (that would be the easy fix).
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top