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My factory SC install went bad, so I'm getting a new engine. It has to be broken in all over again, so I'm thinking of driving the requisite 1000 miles in the next couple of weeks so I'm ready by my track day at the end of the month. I figure someone more experienced with this car can advise me as to whether this is a good or bad idea :D.
 

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May I ask what happened? Man, there are a lot of engines going south. Hope you get it sorted.

You will probably get a variety of opinions, but once the engine is broken in, it is good to go. However, if the engine goes again, wait a little longer next time:p.
 

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1000 miles wouldn't be good enough for me, unless I was sure it was broken in properly.

Was standing around @ LOG and someone brought up breakin (of Roisson in this case).

I was asked:

Never drive at steady speed. If you must take hwy, vary speed between, say, 40-80.

Best is around town driving, stop and go.

Change oil & filter before 1k.

Do not exceed limits listed in manual.


(one young fellow's technique was to put the car in a (too) high gear and floor (i.e. lug) it to redline or something.

My eyes must've got a little big. I asked if he'd shared this technique w/anyone else and what'd they say?

Geez.

Lotus race engineer standing near heard my method and said "Exactly right."

ah....vindication....reinforcement.... I was a happy guy.
 

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I just got a new engine in my 07 Exige S this past Saturday. My car is track-only, but I am putting 600 street miles on it this week before my first track day on 8/14. I doing a fairly hard break-in during these 600 miles, changing the oil and then tearing it up. I am not an engineer and likely should not be listened to. However, I am a big believer in breaking in engines based on how you plan to use them.
 

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Tracking a new engine isn't a problem as long as you drive it correctly - stay off full throttle, don't load the engine in too high gear and make sure the oil is up to temp.

With the toyota you *need* to use high rpm when running in otherwise the second cam does not get bedded in. After a couple hundred miles don't be afraid of going up high near (but not too) the limiter. Try to expose the engine to as many different conditions as possible - so definately avoid steady speed driving.

For comparison this is the running in process in the 211 manual:
"During the car’s initial running, the amount of engine heat
generated should be limited by using only three-quarters of
the engine’s potential for the first 4 hours of track use, or 100
road miles. Full throttle and rpm may be used for brief periods
thereafter until the first service is performed at 200 - 400 miles
(350 - 650 km), or two track day sessions."
 

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one young fellow's technique was to put the car in a (too) high gear and floor (i.e. lug) it to redline or something.
OMG - how to trash a new engine! All that does is cause the cylinders to get gourged by the piston.

However, I am a big believer in breaking in engines based on how you plan to use them.
Absolutely - The key is to just take it a bit eaiser than you would when it's run in.
 

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New Engine

I just installed a new engine in my Exige S. Drove it on the street for 350 miles and used a full range of gears and speeds (up to 6000 rpm). Took the car to the track for a day and kept it under 7000 rpms. Engine never got above 190 degrees (on a 90 degree day) and oil temp was at 212 degrees once the engine got hot (moroso oil pan & accusump). Oil pressure at 40kpa.

Will keep engine under 7000 rpm for first 1000 miles. Change oil and filter. Then use it to it's full potential.

Have owned many many cars and all the mechanics I have ever talked to say the same thing. Break the engine in the way you will drive it. Give it time to seat the valves and piston rings (couple of hundred miles) and then got at it.

By the way, constant over reving and standing starts are the best way to break an engine. Don't do it.
 

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Warning: This is a very controversial topic

This Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power is pretty much how every serious race engine builder I know of -- and I've been in the racing business for more than 30 years -- goes about it in some form or another. Karts, motorcycles, automobiles, etc; it doesn't matter. Just start with either Brad Penn or Joe Gibbs break in oil.
 

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however long it takes to get from dealer to track is how long I would break it in. Break in should be just like the car will be driven.
There's tons of opinions on this, but I'll stick to the one I've used and had 0 issues with in the past.
 

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however long it takes to get from dealer to track is how long I would break it in. Break in should be just like the car will be driven.
There's tons of opinions on this, but I'll stick to the one I've used and had 0 issues with in the past.
I understand, but it depends on what "0 issues" means, doesn't it?

If you did leakdown/compression tests, that's 1 thing, but if it means nothing apparently abnormal was noticed, that's another.

The method I described above has resulted in a number of my cars running better than their twins: 2002, tii, GTO, etc. All proven on tracks.

And, the Lotus engineer said it was correct. I'll stay w/it.

Note, tho, that my auto engineer friend (who knows > about cars than anyone I personally know) says I'm nuts. It's apparently a matter of faith...
 

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1000 miles wouldn't be good enough for me, unless I was sure it was broken in properly.

Was standing around @ LOG and someone brought up breakin (of Roisson in this case).

I was asked:

Never drive at steady speed. If you must take hwy, vary speed between, say, 40-80.

Best is around town driving, stop and go.

Change oil & filter before 1k.

Do not exceed limits listed in manual.
This is good advice.
 

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1000 miles wouldn't be good enough for me, unless I was sure it was broken in properly.

Was standing around @ LOG and someone brought up breakin (of Roisson in this case).

I was asked:

Never drive at steady speed. If you must take hwy, vary speed between, say, 40-80.

Best is around town driving, stop and go.

Change oil & filter before 1k.

Do not exceed limits listed in manual.


(one young fellow's technique was to put the car in a (too) high gear and floor (i.e. lug) it to redline or something.

My eyes must've got a little big. I asked if he'd shared this technique w/anyone else and what'd they say?

Geez.

Lotus race engineer standing near heard my method and said "Exactly right."

ah....vindication....reinforcement.... I was a happy guy.

On the hwy, I always changed gears between 4-6 and sometimes 3rd. Basically never remaining at one RPM.

Don't baby the car the entire break in process. Yes, avoid redline, but after a few hundred miles you are good to shoot into the second cam briefly and supposedly this is good for the engine. Engines that are babied the entire break-in process end up being lazy engines according to my mechanic :shrug:

And after 600 miles, BRIEF trips to redline are acceptable.

:clap:
 

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Like the clown said on Seinfeld, "You're stuck in the past, man."
 

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I understand, but it depends on what "0 issues" means, doesn't it?

If you did leakdown/compression tests, that's 1 thing, but if it means nothing apparently abnormal was noticed, that's another.

The method I described above has resulted in a number of my cars running better than their twins: 2002, tii, GTO, etc. All proven on tracks.

And, the Lotus engineer said it was correct. I'll stay w/it.

Note, tho, that my auto engineer friend (who knows > about cars than anyone I personally know) says I'm nuts. It's apparently a matter of faith...
cars were track only, so they had constant maintenance done. I was always checking compression/leak down, valve lash, oil, etc. Maybe I got lucky, maybe it's just an alternate way to break in a motor... who knows. I think this debate has gone on longer than I could ever hope.
 
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