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Discussion Starter #1
Question of the day - how long do you need to break in your new intake camshaft ? I replaced my last intake cam with a BOE camshaft (stock grind) - valve lash adjusted to .017, lots of Redline assembly lubrication on start up - now I am "breaking it in" by driving it without hitting the big cam. If I drive 300 miles without hitting the big cam, my calculations show it would be ~ 1,600,000 to 2,000,000 revolutions of the engine, depending on average speed and average RPM. I would think that is enough !!! ????

Math:
300 miles at ~40 mph average speed= 7.5 run hours = 450 minutes x 3500 rpm = 1,575,000 revolutions.
 

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The camshaft runs at half the speed of the crankshaft but that's still allot of rotations. I think I've seen 1000 miles as a typical break in cycle.
 

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The camshaft runs at half the speed of the crankshaft but that's still allot of rotations. I think I've seen 1000 miles as a typical break in cycle.
I've replaced 2. The first with OEM, which I stayed off the high cam for 1,000 miles. That one didn't last 7K. Replaced that one with hardened cam from Monkeywrench (along with oil temp/pressure gauge and 200 degree tstat) Same 1,000 break-in. So far, so good.
 

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first I would look up what Toyota or Lotus say for a new engine

second i would surmise every second is less important than the previous second.

Third it occurs to me that when not on the big cam, you are not on the big cam, so what is breaking in....anyway.......
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Technically the big cam slipper is still riding on the cam profile with rocker spring pressure, but yes it’s not seeing full valve spring pressure....
 

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first I would look up what Toyota or Lotus say for a new engine

second i would surmise every second is less important than the previous second.

Third it occurs to me that when not on the big cam, you are not on the big cam, so what is breaking in....anyway.......
I was thinking the same thing when reading this thread. Camshafts really don't need a break-in.
 

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It's not that they don't, sliding surfaces tend to, but it should be straightforward.

Interestingly most online sources show keeping the RPM up as vital for the first 1/2 hour, which is never how I started a new motor.

Must have to do with oil pressure on old V8s
 

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When I use to break-in a fresh motor there were two critical things. First, keep the motor RPM above 1500 RPM so that you have good oil pressure. Second, change the RPM every couple of minutes to make sure that the rings, etc. do not take a bad set. Also, make sure the motor runs for at least 15 minutes once it has been started.

I was taught to use a lot of high pressure lube designed for cam shaft break-in. By the time that the rings are seated, the cam shaft is also done. This was done either on a dyno or in the car. Next step was to take it to the track and race it.

Later,
Eldon
 

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It's not that they don't, sliding surfaces tend to, but it should be straightforward.

Interestingly most online sources show keeping the RPM up as vital for the first 1/2 hour, which is never how I started a new motor.

Must have to do with oil pressure on old V8s
Camshafts with non-roller followers only need about 30 minutes of break-in (typically at or above about 1,500rpm) of course use the cam manufacturers' recommendations. The rpm requirement is more about having the two friction surfaces wear in their normal operating environment so they don't have to endure the slow grinding at idle.
Think of it as a piece of sandpaper on a surface, if you put pressure on the sandpaper and move it fast across the surface it makes some shallow marks but if you do the same and move the sandpaper slowly across the surface you make many deeper marks.
Once the initial break-in is done (after about 30 minutes) the friction surfaces have attained their surface polish and a bit of work hardening that, in theory, will last the life of the cam and followers.
None of this is required with roller cams and followers.
 

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So, after replacing my 2nd Toyota camshaft (first one could have been wiped from previous owner), I went with Monkey Wrench stock grind. I also installed an oil temp and pressure sensor and gauge to make certain I didn't hit the 2nd cam until oil was up to 180 degrees minimum.

Used the car last year, including several HPDE track days. Glad to report cams are good. There is some surface marks but they are smooth and flat as they should be. This further convinces me the cam wiping issue is oil temp, or more specifically, jumping on the high cam too early.
 

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