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2017 Evora 400
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Hi everyone... For those that track their Evoras, I'm hoping to pick your brains a bit. I've got a couple dozen HPDE days under my belt, but in a Cadillac ATS-V, which is FE RWD. I recently picked up a 400, and I'm trying to anticipate how the dynamics will be different and the ways I'll have to adjust braking and turn-in. If the SIMs are to be at all believed, the Evora S in Forza and Assetto Corsa is prone to massive snap-oversteer. Would you say that's true of the 400 as well, or are there strategies to mitigate? I appreciate any insights you can share...
 

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Not at all like the SIMs. I only tracked the 400 once last year but have tracked many rwd AMGs.
The 400 if anything, IMO, may understeer if you try to much trail braking.
 

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Although I am not a track guy, from my experience at autocross and recently driving at the tail of dragon, I do agree with above that depending on how you enter the corner, Evora understeers at the corner exit. I've heard that what you want to be a little bit aggressive on corner entry and power out the corner to induce a bit of oversteer.
 

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Your'e driving an sc so change gear less than you think. Use the torque young padawan.

Seriously lots of time is lost changing gear for no good reason. Go in fast as you dare and can cope with. Let the car get round to the apex and then apply the go pedal allowing for that little bit of understeer as you come out (depending on track and corner). Use the gears and the revvy end of the motor to get speed up on the straight bits.

The brakes are better than you think, so use them. The only thing to watch out for is brake cooling or fluid boiling. Before you get out on track change your fluid to an RBF type.
If you've driven on track before you already know that car balance and weight transfer is key. The Evora is very easy to handle in this respect, even on road suspension. If there's a photographer around the track ask him/her to get some shots on a defined corner at entry, mid corner and leaving the corner. Look at them and see where the balance is.
On constant speed curves use the throttle to balance the understeer/oversteer.

Enjoy.
 

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Braking is fabulous and a plce I close gap on big HP cars. Currently running Hawk DTC70S.
The true brilliance of the car is how it responds to throttle modulation which gives you confidence to power out of corners. Tire pressures are the real key. R888s like 30/32 hot.
 

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2007 Lotus Exige S
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I'm curious what you are doing in the SIM to spin it so much. While that may not be exactly how it will handle in real life the same concepts will apply (while you may not spin you might be doing something that upsets the car) and saving a spin in a mid-engine car is not as easy as a front engine car. It can also be harder to judge corner entry speed and track camber in a SIM than in real life, at least for me.
 

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He's on fire!
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I don't own an evora, but I would tell you this. With an engine in the front aggressive weight shifts are more ok because it is likely you'll still be pointed in the same direction.

In a mid engine, a lot depends on your alignment, but there is a balance to be found on turn in. Your weight is behind you, so you need to weight the front tires via braking to get the most out of turn in. Too much brake and you'll overwhelm the available front grip and probably understeer. Not enough brake and the grip will be below its maximum potential- if you're turning the wheel less it will be fine, if you're turning the wheel more, again you'll have understeer.

When you are applying throttle mid turn you do not want to make sudden lifts - throttle down keeps the weight in the rear, which keeps the rear end pinned - lifting off unweights the back, and can result in the rear end stepping out. When you initiate throttle during the turn, you need to remain committed.
 

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The mid engine layout will reward finesse and a stock Evora likes to be precise (relatively speaking). Kissing curbs is best, killing curbs is okay but less rewarding. At 8/10th's the car is a dream to drive for 95% of people. At 9/10th's it's simply wonderful if you have good car control. Like every track day, start at 5/10th's and you'll find yourself very comfortable as you slowly push harder.

There is no snap-oversteer unless the inputs are violent. And likes other have said, brakes are great--if you're boiling fluid, it's your braking technique. Be smooth on the brake pedal but decisive & quick... don't ride the brakes before & after the majority of slowing down (almost all people do this for the first dozen+ track events).

Evora's are great track cars, low maintenance, high performing, fun-fun-fun!!! My Exige S felt faster but the Evora IS faster... it just does it with finesse so it doesn't give the sensation of naughty speed. ;) --Sherman, driving & classroom instructor for the past 20 years.
 

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Hello pkoz,

HethelSport's advice is the best - be smooth. I've learned the most important things are:
Turn-in: Eyes Up! Look ahead to the apex and beyond. You want a smooth arc around the corner.
Apex: Make your tires kiss the curb
Exit: Complete your turn at track edge, even if you think you don't need to go out to track edge. "Pinching" the exit is a common error. As you learn to go faster, eventually the pinch will bite you in the ass.
Two wheels off pavement: Never jerk the wheel to bring the car back on track. Instant spin and slide across the track, maybe to the wall. Gently slow the car until you can smoothly bring the car back on pavement. I saw two good cars written off at SCCA drivers school last month.
Track elevation change down: Make sure your car is pointing straight when the tires unload. If you're turning(car rotating) when the tires/springs are unloaded, the car will continue to rotate without your control.
Have fun! That's the most important part.

Regards,
Dan
 

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Hi everyone... For those that track their Evoras, I'm hoping to pick your brains a bit. I've got a couple dozen HPDE days under my belt, but in a Cadillac ATS-V, which is FE RWD. I recently picked up a 400, and I'm trying to anticipate how the dynamics will be different and the ways I'll have to adjust braking and turn-in. If the SIMs are to be at all believed, the Evora S in Forza and Assetto Corsa is prone to massive snap-oversteer. Would you say that's true of the 400 as well, or are there strategies to mitigate? I appreciate any insights you can share...
I actually just got Assetto Corsa, and wow, they really got the Evora S wrong. I have a lot of seat time in them, and nope, not right at all. That car is really knife edged, which doesn't describe the S or the 400 at all.

Drive the GTE in the game. That's a lot closer to reality. The 400 is a big pussy cat, so as long as you are not making wild inputs, it'll be a lot easier to drive than the ATS-V, which is another car that I have a lot of seat time with.
 

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2007 Lotus Exige S
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I know this is off topic, but how does the limited field of view affect driving in VR for you?
I use the Rift as well and its better than my triple monitors were. You can look left and right better and really look ahead to where you want to go. For me it really makes the experience better, like going from an introductory wheel to one with force feedback. I just have to memorize buttons on the wheel better.
 

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Yeah, Assetto Corsa's Evora feels so different from the real car...

I've left my Evora in the United States due to COVID-19 and been playing Assetto Corsa back in Korea and car either understeers or snap oversteers...
 

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I actually love it in VR. I don't get motion sick though, but I will say that Dirt Rally in VR sometimes is pretty disorienting, but then again being in a rally car at full clip probably is too.
I actually only tried it once. Boneworks, now Alex (with my sons) has taken all the VR time. Alex is amazing.
Yes, this thread has gotten off topic, sorry OP.
 

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2017 Evora 400
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Discussion Starter #20
It's all good- lots of really great advice in here- thanks all!
Admittedly, I'm crap at Sim driving- 30 years of feeling a car definitely makes the experience frustrating. Maybe VR will help, but it's probably also a good lesson in using my eyes more and consistently picking my points. But the Evora models were just so much more difficult to control than any other ME like a Cayman or 488, that I started to become really concerned. In either case, track day insurance might not be the worst idea while I adjust ;-)
 
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