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The holy trinity is heat, vibration and RPM.
Years ago I had a 4 cylinder Ford (Mk11 Cortina) that I tuned. It was very reliable but every time I took it for a long drive it would blow the alternator after about 50 miles. Drove me crazy. I fixed it permanently by bolting an thick aluminum plate to the block and then rubber mounted a similar block to this. The alternator was bolted to this. This eliminated the high frequency vibrations that kept destroying the electronics.
 

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Years ago I had a 4 cylinder Ford (Mk11 Cortina) that I tuned. It was very reliable but every time I took it for a long drive it would blow the alternator after about 50 miles. Drove me crazy. I fixed it permanently by bolting an thick aluminum plate to the block and then rubber mounted a similar block to this. The alternator was bolted to this. This eliminated the high frequency vibrations that kept destroying the electronics.
I went thru this with hot rod Elan until I found a mount w/rubber.

While it took 1000s of miles for my alternators to go, principle is the same.
 

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Having a local shop rebuild your starter, generator, alternator, wiper motor, et al used to be the norm. It was considered wasteful to replace a part that was only lacking new bearings and a few other inexpensive parts. Even shorted motor windings can be repaired with new lacquer.



All that changed with the advent of cheap labor in nearby foreign locales. Now we export used parts to a place that pays poor wages in rotten working conditions. The toxic waste stays behind and they send us crappy parts for cheap. That's a false economy six different ways. It blows my mind that I can buy a new flywheel for my truck cheaper than I can have someone machine the friction surface flat again . . . that's just a waste of physical resources.



You have to look hard to find them, but there are still shops in the US that will rebuild your component (if you can't do it yourself). Keep the OEM part if you can - it is often of far better quality than what is available on the secondary market (and may even be a better grade than the dealer sells as a replacement part). Because the new ethic is throw the whole thing away and replace it, it is getting harder and harder to do component level repairs. I had to search all over the place just to find a condensor for my Bosch alternator. The local parts shop told me they could order a new alternator. Really? To replace a $1 part?



Glen

M


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