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Not a Robot
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Discussion Starter #1
...I'm thorough, that's all. It all stems from performing an upgraded turbo swap way back in the day on my first DSM. I left a shop rag in the manifold to turbo inlet, you know one of those red ones. When the job was done, of course the engine would not start. I wonder why? After days of beating myself up over this conumdrum, I took the car to Mitsubishi. They suggested taking the cylinder head off...huh what? I passed on their recommended course and towed the car back home. The car ran perfectly prior to the turbo install, so I figured, let's remove the turbo. Fortunately the turbo is smack dab in front of the engine bay with easy access, and for whatever reason I decided to remove the exhaust manifold first. And there it was, black and burnt as something left on the stove unattended, staring at me with it's evil leer. I nearly fell over in astonishment, smacked my head with a greasy hand, and yelled F*** ME!

Upon removal of said blockage, all was well in the land and so started my path down double and triple checking everything. For better or worse, it's the trufus rufus.

This is a great enthusiast forum and I'm so glad to be part of it.
 

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Less is Better
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2,371 Posts
...I'm thorough, that's all. It all stems from performing an upgraded turbo swap way back in the day on my first DSM. I left a shop rag in the manifold to turbo inlet, you know one of those red ones. When the job was done, of course the engine would not start. I wonder why? After days of beating myself up over this conumdrum, I took the car to Mitsubishi. They suggested taking the cylinder head off...huh what? I passed on their recommended course and towed the car back home. The car ran perfectly prior to the turbo install, so I figured, let's remove the turbo. Fortunately the turbo is smack dab in front of the engine bay with easy access, and for whatever reason I decided to remove the exhaust manifold first. And there it was, black and burnt as something left on the stove unattended, staring at me with it's evil leer. I nearly fell over in astonishment, smacked my head with a greasy hand, and yelled F*** ME!

Upon removal of said blockage, all was well in the land and so started my path down double and triple checking everything. For better or worse, it's the trufus rufus.

This is a great enthusiast forum and I'm so glad to be part of it.
Now this brings me back. I've done that job, many, many years ago. I agree, replacing a turbo couldn't be any easier than it is on an Eclipse. But man, the reliability of the DSM was poor. Something was always breaking or leaking. I had to get a second one just to see if they were all that way, sure enough, the second one was just as bad. But these cars had really nice handling and great ride compliance and it was awesome to rip around in the snow in total confidence. AWD sports cars are pretty rare these days.
 

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Stuff like your story are why I'm something of an advocate for checklists (yes, Atul Gawande has convinced me).

Say what you will about their reliability and jokes about crank walk, but it's my opinion that DSMs have been unsung heroes in their contributions to the population of car enthusiasts. I'd also argue that a good fraction of people had reliability issues because they were pushing like 70 psi through their 4G63 with minimal supporting engine work.

Disclaimer: I own a 4G63T-powered vehicle and would really like to pick up an Eclipse GSX for fun.
 

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Less is Better
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2,371 Posts
Stuff like your story are why I'm something of an advocate for checklists (yes, Atul Gawande has convinced me).

Say what you will about their reliability and jokes about crank walk, but it's my opinion that DSMs have been unsung heroes in their contributions to the population of car enthusiasts. I'd also argue that a good fraction of people had reliability issues because they were pushing like 70 psi through their 4G63 with minimal supporting engine work.

Disclaimer: I own a 4G63T-powered vehicle and would really like to pick up an Eclipse GSX for fun.
My cars were stock, but the list of problems included everything from warped heads, to leaking oil galley plugs to dead alternators to ticking lifters to broken clutch hydraulics to leaking hatches to dead sunroofs. Just one thing after another. Like I said, they were fun, but money pits. Now stock cars are like unicorns and even abused or modified cars are hard to find.
 

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Oh man, my DSM experience was quite the opposite. I bought a gorgeous burgundy and gray first gen while my 2 3SGTE powered MR2’s were both down with the myriad of problems those cars have (still can’t comprehend that some of the Lotus guys run that trans in our cars. Not one of my 5 2nd gen MR2’s went without syncro issues).

I added a 16g turbo, full turbo back and a simple, manual, boost controller, upgraded side mount and dominated street races with that thing.

Nothing ever went wrong in ~a year and I launched that thing constantly. It was so well know and reliable that I sold it for $2k more than I had into it and went back to my mega unreliable MR2’s.
 

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Less is Better
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2,371 Posts
Oh man, my DSM experience was quite the opposite. I bought a gorgeous burgundy and gray first gen while my 2 3SGTE powered MR2’s were both down with the myriad of problems those cars have (still can’t comprehend that some of the Lotus guys run that trans in our cars. Not one of my 5 2nd gen MR2’s went without syncro issues).

I added a 16g turbo, full turbo back and a simple, manual, boost controller, upgraded side mount and dominated street races with that thing.

Nothing ever went wrong in ~a year and I launched that thing constantly. It was so well know and reliable that I sold it for $2k more than I had into it and went back to my mega unreliable MR2’s.
Ironically counter to that, my dad drove his '91 Turbo SW20 for 360,000 miles without a hiccup from the transmission. The turbos gave up, he had to replace the clutch a couple times and the exhaust manifold warped twice, but his car was as solid as one could hope for. Mine was a 3vzfe swapped hard top with the 3SGTE and I also never had a problem with it :). In fact, I liked that car so much that I sold my Boxster S that I had at the same time because it wasn't as much fun to drive. I never really liked the action of the linkage of the transmission, but it was stout in my experience.

To be fair, I never had transmission problems with the DSMs either, but I did do a clutch at about 100,000 miles.
 

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Not a Robot
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57 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
DSM's hold a special place in my heart. I personally never had any reliability issues. The 3 I've owned were turnkey reliable...unless ran hard, which I did...just limited to clutch and axle. My '91 Talon suffered from a broken rear axle (3-bolt) after a hard launch post centerforce clutch. I upgraded to the '92+ 4-bolt rear/axles and never saw that issue again. That car had a 16g, MBC, full 3-inch exhaust, and some suspension/wheels. To me, at that time, it RIPPED. With the addiction setting in, I sold Talon and jumped into a "95 GSX. I went further on this one...18g, 550's, SAFC, FMIC, HKS pump, etc. Crankwalk issues were just starting to become the norm about this time, but my close Mitsu mechanic friend had told me far before to disconnect the clutch/starter safety switch and start the car in neutral/no clutch. I never had an issue and made respectable power for that era with a street car. It was the late 90's and one of my DSM gang members left and procured a JZA80 Supra. He installed a downpipe, fuel-cut-defencer, and converted to non-sequential...I was hooked like CRACK. Several Toyota and Nissan platforms later, I did revisit my DSM roots and picked up a stock "97 GSX. I kept it stock and should have never sold it. It would be so difficult to find such an unmolested 2nd gen awd mt these days.

Ok, now I feel really old. Thanks guys.
 

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Stuff like your story are why I'm something of an advocate for checklists (yes, Atul Gawande has convinced me).
I came from an aviation background and am an amateur historian. If you want to know why air travel is always the safest way to get between A and B, the biggest contributor is checklists for both normal and contingency operations. All operations. Everything from fueling to a dead stick landing has a checklist. Add in CRM and exhaustive blameless fault finding and you get a great system.

It really points out just how smug and insular most medical practice in the US is that Gawande is a superstar (and polarizing figure) just for pointing out that another industry has been doing it better since...about 1935.

And yeah, I do better work on my cars when I run a checklist as well. Especially if I've done the process many times and think I know it by heart.
 
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