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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
When you drive an Elise, you can sometimes here a squeeze toy type squeak at lower speeds. Like turning into a driveway and hitting the small entrance bump. Some thought it was the sway bar. It's not.

My sway bar is disconnected at the moment as I am making the bar adjustable and adding poly bushings to replace the squishorama stock bushes. So today I have been driving the car around with no sway bar...yet the squeeze toy sound remains!

It appears to be emanating from the lower A-arm bushings at the frame. I doused them all with some silicone spray and the squeak vanished, at least for a bit. The upper A-arm bushes seem to be more squeak resistant as they have some more space to the frame since the caster adjustment shims take up some room in that case.

You can lube up the bushes top and bottom by just turning the wheels all the way in each direction and getting the front or rear done on a side with spray silicone A better, more permanent fix would be to fit some thin, greased shims to act as a bearing.
 

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Excellent Stan! Mine went away on it's own after some time. Good to know if it comes back, it was indeed annoying.
 

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I can see that Stan is going to be someone we all want to keep on our good sides, as he has already come up with all kinds of great Elise-related info. :bow: :clap: :D

Thanks Stan !
 

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Mine suddenly appeared after a few weeks, got really loud a few days later, and now seems to have subsided. It's almost gone. But I'll definitely keep this in mind, in case it pops up again.
 

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This remark comes with a disclaimer, but I've always heard to never put silicone on a rubber bushing. Something about breakdown and disintegration of the rubber.
 

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Oh,,, I thought a tire was rubbing! Stan are you making the bar adjustable by adding holes on both sides of the stock hole?
 

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pianomaniac said:
This remark comes with a disclaimer, but I've always heard to never put silicone on a rubber bushing. Something about breakdown and disintegration of the rubber.
Really? I know guys used to silicone their engine hoses to make them all black and shiny.

Then they found out what silicone spray does to O2 sensors and stopped. Keep that stuff out of the engine bay!

Does it really disintegrate rubber?
 

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Stan said:
A better, more permanent fix would be to fit some thin, greased shims to act as a bearing.
That could be done, but the rubber bushes are not supposed to work like that.

The standard bushes are of a type which has a steel inner tube and a rubber outer layer bonded onto it.

This is pressed into the wishbone and then the wishbone is placed onto the car.

The bolts securing the wishbones are then torqued up when the car is lowered to the ground.

The reason for this is that the bushes are supposed to work by flexing the rubber and not rotating themselves. The steel inner tube is held stationary by the clamping force of the bolt and chassis mounts, while the rubber layer provides the 'flex' to allow the wishbone to rotate.

They have to be torqued at the normal ride height, as this will put the bushes at their 'unstressed' state during normal driving and they 'load up' as the suspension compresses or extends.

Freely rotating types of links are an option too. A popular upgrade is to use nylatron inserts which will rotate over a steel tube that's inserted. Another option for racers (but you need new wishbones for that) is to tuse rod-ends/rose-joints on the wishbones.

You have to be careful that the steel tube itself doesn't rotate as it can start 'chewing' into the wishbone mounts on the chassis and some of these are not replaceable (unless you get a new chassis)

Bye, Arno.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I wouldn't sweat the silicon spray too much. Since I used it as a diagnostic aid to help locate the squeak toy sound. I wouldn't expect it to be a semipermanent fix - you'd have to keep spraying it all the time. You can get very thin "washers" that are accurately sized as shims. Of inconsequential thickness. That would quiet things down if you assembled them onto the a-arms. Lotus themselves used what appears to be a reddish grease on the rubber swaybar bushings, BTW. Since some folks have mentioned that the sound went away, maybe the frame gets polished in the relevant area after a time through normal use.
 
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