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shay2nak
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24,985 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
you guys know if my insurance is going to lay da smackdown for being guilty on expired license? It's a zero point violation.
 

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shay2nak
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24,985 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
essentially it's a correctable violation as well. I had it as a misdemeanor, but was reduced to an infraction.
 

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Mulholland>SCC
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2,532 Posts
I'd imagine they may not make any pay outs on your policy if you were driving w/o a license and had any claims against you. Just guessing here.
 

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Registered
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6,515 Posts
I'd imagine they may not make any pay outs on your policy if you were driving w/o a license and had any claims against you. Just guessing here.
+1
 

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You shouldn't incur any insurance related issues in this case.

Now the other way around could be a real issue. (Especially in Maryland; I am sure it is similar in other states) Having a car licensed with elapsed insurance can be a quite the financial drag. The state of Maryland will charge the uninsured motorist $21 per day during the time while the insurance coverage has lapsed until it is re-instated of the plates are turned in. This is aided by the insurance companies reporting in to the state auto policies that have expired, lapsed due to payment or been canceled. The "brilliant" part about this is that the state only lets the motorist know that he or she is in this condition until after a sufficiently gross amount of charges have been accrued. Most of the time folks are caught in this issue when they forget or fail to return a set of license plates off of a car they sold and then canceled their coverage.
 

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You shouldn't incur any insurance related issues in this case.
Beg to differ. You don't think an insurance company would have some issues if a claim were made to them, and the driver of the insured car was not legally licensed to operate a motor vehicle?

The least that would happen is dropped coverage.
 

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4,221 Posts
Beg to differ. You don't think an insurance company would have some issues if a claim were made to them, and the driver of the insured car was not legally licensed to operate a motor vehicle?

The least that would happen is dropped coverage.
There would have to be an exclusion in the policy for that. I don't know of one in particular. Some companies will declare the driver ineligible for an policy if they are not licensed at the time of initial underwriting. Still, if there is no exclusion for that in the policy and no duty in the contract placed upon the insured, the claim would be paid.

Case in point:

You must promptly notify us when:
1. your mailing or residence address changes;
2. the principal garaging address for a covered auto or a trailer shown on the
declarations page changes;
3. there is a change with respect to the residents in your household or the persons who regularly operate a covered auto;
4. an operator’s marital status changes; or
5. you or a relative obtain a driver’s license or operator’s permit.
This is from the 'Duties of An Insured' section of an Auto policy. Nowhere in there does it say that the insured has a duty to inform the company of a change in license status. And in this particular policy, there is no exclusion for losses arising out of a driver who has an expired, suspended, or revoked license or even out of those of an unlicensed driver.

They do however, have the ability to issue statutory notice of cancellation as delineated in the 'Cancellation' section of the same policy:

After this policy is in effect for 60 days, or if this is a renewal or continuation policy,
we may cancel only for one or more of the following reasons:
1. nonpayment of premium;
2. material misrepresentation or fraud by you with respect to any material fact
in the procurement or renewal of this policy;
3. material misrepresentation or fraud in the submission of any claim under this policy; or
4. the driver’s license or motor vehicle registration of the named insured or of
any other operator who either resides in the same household or customarily
operates a covered auto has been under suspension or revocation during
the initial policy period or the 180 days immediately preceding its effective
date, or if the policy is a renewal, during the renewal policy period.
Still, coverage would apply until cancellation takes effect and if the license issue is rectified prior to the effective date of cancellation, the policy would be reinstated.

To answer the OP's question, it really depends on your state laws and/or your company's underwriting guidelines. Some companies treat it harshly since DWLS is generally a criminal traffic offense; some overlook it completely.
 

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shay2nak
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Discussion Starter #9
oh sh*t! i hope the insurance doesn't drop me...

I have a valid license...always have, just didn't know it had expired...simple mistake...simple fix.

I renewed my license 4 weeks ago. As soon as i got the ticket I went to the DMV to get it renewed. Those bastards never sent me a notice to renew. Who's going to remember when it's every 5 years!
 

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oh sh*t! i hope the insurance doesn't drop me...

I have a valid license...always have, just didn't know it had expired...simple mistake...simple fix.

I renewed my license 4 weeks ago. As soon as i got the ticket I went to the DMV to get it renewed. Those bastards never sent me a notice to renew. Who's going to remember when it's every 5 years!
They shouldn't drop you. You're definitely not the first; you're definitely not the last. What I was getting at was that they may issue cancellation or nonrenewal if your license remained expired and they caught it on underwriting at renewal. Since you've already taken care of it, no harm, no foul. Even then, had they issued cancellation or nonrenewal, if you took care of it before the drop-dead date, you'd still be OK. You have little to worry about, IMO.
 

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shay2nak
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24,985 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
They shouldn't drop you. You're definitely not the first; you're definitely not the last. What I was getting at was that they may issue cancellation or nonrenewal if your license remained expired and they caught it on underwriting at renewal. Since you've already taken care of it, no harm, no foul. Even then, had they issued cancellation or nonrenewal, if you took care of it before the drop-dead date, you'd still be OK. You have little to worry about, IMO.
sweet...thanks :up:
 
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