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Discussion Starter #1
OK. This is for the IPS folks that have experienced IPS in the S1, 400, and GT cars.

1. Has the shift logic, durability, reliability, trackability improved or stayed the same with each upgrade?

2. Who has heavily tracked their IPS car and how has it held up?

3. How good/bad is it compared to other paddle shifted cars you have owned or tracked?

I am looking to a future with paddles as that seems to be where we are headed, and frankly, as good as I am with my manual, I know it is definitely a limiter for me compared to the cars out there that are paddle shifted such as PDK cars. I may have opprtunity to get a sweetheart deal on an IPS car. It intrigues me to try at the track as a true comparo to my 6 speed in the same car besides the tranny.
 

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No one out there has driven different generations of the IPS??? No wonder they don't sell.
 

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They sell pretty good here... Just not for track cars.

I doubt I would ever track my S1 IPS. The lag is retarded long once you've driven a PDK.

Is it good as a daily driver, yes. The part throttle low load pop is nice... but rung out it has crazy lag.
 

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ok... IPS is pretty good for a paddle shifter, its not pdk, but it is very quick compared to my older AMG.
Yes, manuals are more engaging, but in reality, you shift faster with IPS and you can anticipate the need to shift.
Aurally, the shifting sounds great with IPS. With the decat, its noticeably better.

Of course, in traffic and other daily activities, the option for auto is very welcome. It also allows you to allow friends/souses to drive your car if you are that generous.
 

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My first Evora 400 was an IPS. I didn't mind it, shifts were reasonably crisp for a torque converter auto. The auto rev match on downshifts while in sport mode were very artificial and annoying, quite slow. But when in manual mode and shifting with paddles, it was a good tranny.

It had major range sensor/tranny MIL / wiring harness issues and car turned out be a lemon. I know earlly IPS were notoriously unreliable but even my 2017 was surprisingly not any better. I am now in a 6 speed and car is trouble free.
 

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I've had a '12 N/A IPS and now a '17 400 IPS, I really love my 2017, put it in race mode and let the car do the thinking... I don't track
 

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I've had a '12 N/A IPS and now a '17 400 IPS, I really love my 2017, put it in race mode and let the car do the thinking... I don't track
I saw a video that described race mode as "you have to lose grip once, then it calibrates to the conditions"... true? I havent had the guts to try it on track yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
After my test drive recently in the 4C, I started to revisit this concept as that tranny was pretty damn impressive. I dare say, it was a highlight of the car.
 

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After my test drive recently in the 4C, I started to revisit this concept as that tranny was pretty damn impressive. I dare say, it was a highlight of the car.
I've driven an N/A Evora with IPS, a 4C, a C7 Grand Sport with auto, a Porsche PDK, and a an Audi TTRS DCT. Here are my general thoughts.

The PDK and the Audi DCT were definitely the fastest shifting of the bunch, BUT they felt very disconnected from the car somehow. There would be times when I would be pushing the car and I would get very anemic, unsatisfying shifts. Then other times when I would be driving smoothy and the transmission would be a little jerky for no reason. Every once in a while I'd get satisfying shifts while pushing the car, but it felt very random to me. So to me these are the fastest, but not the most enjoyable or satisfying.

The 4C DCT isn't considered to be a very good DCT from a mechanical perspective. It's a dry DCT which leads to durability issues apparently, and it is a tad slower than say a Porsche PDK. However, when driving the 4C I found it to be plenty responsive and very satisfying to shift with and use. Alfa did a great job giving the transmission a lot of character and having it feel connected with the car.

My C7 Grand Sport was a traditional torque converter auto. It was buttery smooth around town, felt well in-tune to the car when in auto-mode, and while I wouldn't say it was a complete P.O.S as other automotive journalists claim, when you used the paddles you could tell the transmission was just following pre-determined shift points. So sometimes you'd press the paddles and it would shift quickly, but it would only be becuase you were close to a pre-determined shifting RPM. Other times you'd press it and it would lag a second or two since the next nearest shift point would be 1-2 seconds away. I would say the C7 transmission is not a gratifying paddle shift experience, due to how slow and artificial it feels, even though the transmission itself is decent.

To me the N/A Evora IPS was quite good. It is not "INSTANT instant" when you press the paddle, but the transmission definitely feels faster than the one in my C7 Grand Sport, and it's jumping to gear without you feeling like you really have to wait on it. To be honest you can tell Lotus spent a lot of time getting the transmission to feel properly sporty and responsive when in sport mode. I'm not sure if they just programmed a ton of shift points to make the car feel really responsive or what exactly they did but they put a lot more effort into it than the Corvette guys did. I think it would be hard to say that it is better than a proper DCT, but if you have an IPS it's certainly not hurting your ability to enjoy the car by any means.
 

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brg I'm not sure how I missed this first time.

My IPS has gone though numerous software upgrades, some better than the others. The current (and I believe most up to date) is good but the last one was the best, although it caused the car to stall once. That update was only on it for a month or so and its been running the current one for 3-4 years. There is a bit of lag in the current set up that I don't remember, but the car has been sitting a lot over the last 12 months so that may have something to do with it. I do think it's learning process has a lot to do with it. Ie if you're taking it easy on it for a while and then start to beat on it, the lag is more pronounced for a while until it realised, oh hes beating on me now. And by lag I mean it slurs into gear more than I remember as it used to bang them home quickly. I haven't tracked it but I think it would be fine with my capabilities but I could see it possibly being difficult at 10/10s. I do like that it will not shift at the red line and it rarely refuses to give you a gear on downshift. I like the throttle blip/rev match and overall it is a decent gearbox. On the tactile side, the paddles are actually metal (even though they look plastic) and have a satisifying physical pull to them, which makes you feel like you are somewhat involved, unlike the switch feel in say a VAG product. The Evora gearbox is programmed to work as a proper flappy paddle so pulling back both puts it in N and pulling up will put it into gear and holding up or down puts it back into auto. My biggest critism is it freewheels in first but this is only an issue in traffic - if youre in 1st and lift off and then get back on the throttle the torque converter feels like it has to catch back up and the car clunks forward when the gear hits after a flush of revs. FWIW I never understand the critism here about the IPS being unreliable other than that one software related stall (it dropped the idle revs to low), mine has been perfect.

As for comparsions to other flappy paddle cars. When I got the Evora I had come out of a DSG TTS and at the time I felt the IPS was better. One was the feel of the paddles (the Audi flet like flicking a switch) but while the DSG was fast (there wasn't much noticeable difference in speed) the IPS shifted better and got lost less than the DSG. I also found I had to drive around the DSG at times, ie lift a little at times to smooth things out. The IPS was more of a drivers gearbox as it would hold onto gears, rev match and overall fell more agressive.

I've driven a few PDKs. The boxster one had the push pull paddles and I didn't like it at all. The Turbo S one was very close to the IPS but I couldn't say which was better as the speed of the 911 was overwhelming.

The IPS was better than the single clutch autos I've driven - namely as it is less clunky, although this isn'much of an issue any more as there are few cars left that use that set up.

I guess I should mention the Stelvio since you have one and I'm running both now. While I love the big fixed Alfa paddles, they are less physical than the Evora ones, so the Evora might take a slight win there on the feel. To be fair, I like the steering wheel ones better as they are always by your hands, but those Alfa ones just look awesome! I have been thinking that maybe my current critism on the IPS is from driving the Alfa every day but I'm not 100% sure. The Alfa in S is a lot of fun, the rev match is fun (although I think the Evora does it better) and the Alfa banging home gears is agressive, which the child in me loves, whereas the IPS just shifts. It does seem like the Alfa bangs them home slightly quicker than the IPS and the downshifts are similar. Again I think that might be somewhat due to lack of driving the Evora in a sporty manner (its really only been on a few long road trips since I got it back from the body shop so I think the gearbox has gone into lazy mode, especially as it seems to slur home he gears now, which I don't remember it doing).

Lastly I test drove a still new 17 400 auto last year. I was conscience of the gearbox and in my relatively brief drive it felt more like my cars last program. It felt a little more agressive and responsive than my car and it was almost enough to convince me to buy it (ultimately the were still asking too much for it).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all that. very helpful. Why won't they give you the Torsion with IPS? Just discovered this tidbit.
 

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IMO the IPS doesn't compare to any DCT trans i've experienced but is far superior to Ferrari's F1 trans, Audi/Lambo single clutch trans and BMW SMG trans.
 

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THat puts it in pretty good company then...Interested!!
 

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Knowing what I know of electronically shifted automatics, I recommend you talk to BOE about their shift kit for the IPS. It should both help the transmission run cooler and last longer and provide better shifts.

(I am not currently a customer of BOE - just have experience with this sort of problem and solution.)
 

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I have driven a PDK Porsche, Ferrari 458 DCT, Evo Lancer DCT, Alfa Romeo Gulia ZF Auto, and now have a Lotus Evora IPS. I only compare manual modes, because the only time I care about quick shifts is when I'm going fast and then I want to shift on my own.

Ferrari DCT was the best overall, but I was only driving on track. Evo Lancer actually felt closer to the Ferrari DCT surprisingly, but was brutal in stop and go. That quick snap you get on downshifting into the corner, isn't so satisfying when you just want to stop from 30 mph commuting.

The PDK was the best overall. The shifts were still snappy and quick at high rpm, but not harsh in daily driving conditions.

The Alfa ZF was really good. You wouldn't notice the lack of snap when pushing the car unless you really were looking for it. Driving normally in traffic, it's not harsh, not smooth. Just gets the job done.

The Lotus IPS is not bad when pushing the car in manual mode, certainly not sluggish, and not dissapointing like it's slowing you down. It just doesn't have that gratifying instant click into gear a DCT would. In normal auto mode, bumper to bumper daily driving is fantastic. A little jerky here and there but great compared a true DCT.

Overall the Porsche PDK is the best do it all real DCT. The Evo DCT actually clicks into gear with no delay, but is awful in traffic. The Ferrari on track, really good shifts but from what I've read suffers like the Evo does in traffic.

The ZF box in Alfa and a lot of other cars is the best non DCT option, with IPS being a close second.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
NO LSD...why???
 
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