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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Been reading some of the Celica GT-S boards...everybody over there refers to the high cam as "lift" as in hitting lift. Some say we VTEC our motors when the cam changes over to the large lobes with higher lift. Personally, "Lift" sounds good to me and less like we are acting like we have a Honda motor in our car. Guess they had to come up with an easier name since Toyota calls it V V T L i. Actually since we change cam lobes as well as the phasing of the intake cam, the Honda equivalent is i-VTEC. Honda's type R 1.8 liter changes to larger intake and exhaust lobes at high revs but does not change cam phasing at all. Neither does the S2000 lump. But the RSX-S and some others have the cam phasing device added to them.
 

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I dunno. I don't think I like it. 'Lift' to me is what I shouldn't do when I realize I've overcooked a corner entry.

If I lift while in lift while turning left, will they lift me into the ambulance or just lift my insurance bill?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well that is how the Toyota folks refer to it. Or going up on the cam or on cam maybe? Just *not* VTECing!
 

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Evl said:
I think "on the cams" works fine.
Yea, what he said. "On the Cams"...
 

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OK, my first post... hi everybody, I drive a Honda when I dont pine for an Exige or Elise.

IMHO, the word "lift" is already reserved for something you do on the track to shift wieght to the front wheels... as in "lifting the throttle"

VTEC was the original (actually originally borrowed from Porsche) switching of cam lobe profiles at a certain rpm (in reality its actuated by oil pressure, not rpms, except on home-made hybrids).

When you are accelerating it switches at one point, and when you are decelerating it switches back at some other point (lower, to help you stay in the agressive mode when shifting)

In 2001, Honda introduced i-VTEC, and the extra "i" is designated for the engines that do adjust phase or "cam timing" as well as doing the lobe switchover.

There are a couple of flavors of i-VTEC, one being the traditional, agressive kind where you have a "normal" cam and an "agressive" cam profiles, and the other kind, where you have a "economy" cam and a "normal" profile. But all i-VTEC engines have continuously self-adjusting cam timing of +/- 50degrees depending on the situation.
 

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Just for clarification, is VTEC the same as Porsche's variocam, right? BTW, can anyone explain what Variocam Plus is?
 

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Randy do you agree?

It's OK to lift when overcooking a corner but you've gotta be ready to get back on the gas as soon as the rotation is at the optimal point in order to exit the corner correctly. Lift, rotate, gas it and exit. Randy do you agree?
Randy is the AutoX surgeon, I'm the high speed demon ala Sears Pt., Laguna Seca.... It's a lot easier to modulate the rotation of a car in a huge high speed corner than a short AutoX corner..
 

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I was raised by a pack of truck drivers so I call it, "puttin the hammer down, come on."
 

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Re: Randy do you agree?

perryeyges said:
It's OK to lift when overcooking a corner but you've gotta be ready to get back on the gas as soon as the rotation is at the optimal point in order to exit the corner correctly. Lift, rotate, gas it and exit.
In motorcycle racing, they even use the rear brake to get the back tire to slide a little and point the bike in the right direction.

Back in the 90's, a racer named Mick Doohan injured his ankle so badly that he couldn't work the rear brake with his foot. His mechanics put a little rear brake lever on the handlebars so he could slide the rear on corner entry.

This worked so well, that in a few races, everyone had a rear brake lever on their handlebars.
 
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