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Yeah I know this has nothing to do with cars but I just got accepted into the Air Force as a pilot! Woo hoo. I start OTS (officer training school) in a month. I'm hoping that by the time I get out (late Aug) my elise will almost be here. Unitl then I'll just have to read on this site how much all the first batch elise drivers are loving their car.
 

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Very cool. That was something I wanted to do...
 

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When do you find out what you'll be flying?

A friend of mine instructed in F-16s for the AF last I knew...I wonder if he still is.
 

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That is badass! Congratulations! You'll pick up a lot of chicks if you're not already married! LOL Remember Tailhook? HAHAAHA
 

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That's awesome.

I got my private pilot certificate 2 years ago and I love it. I'm no fighter pilot but I still have loads of fun.

Right after college I almost went into the AF to be a pilot. But I choose a different career. Both my grandfathers were in and my sister is in now as an intel officer.
 

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Congrats! That's awesome!

My biggest regret in life is not having joined a branch of the military or even joining ROTC in college. I think the discipline, confidence and commraderie I could have gained would have been useful in my life.

I plan on learning to fly (personal aircraft) this summer. I wouldn't have made it as a pilot in the AF though... I wore really thick glasses up until a few months ago. (And I only corrected it through LASIK which, if I remember correctly, still would have omitted me from being a pilot.) Sadly, I'm too old now to join any branch of the Armed Services.

Bob
 

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Cool. Of course, I'm against the amassing and use of military force, but what Elise fan wouldn't be impressed by a vehicle that can pull over 5g's ?!? :D
 

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This is Slope's thread where we can congratulate him on his accomplishment and wish him well. Please don't make it a political thread.
 

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Traditionally speaking, America has been untrusting of a large standing military, which can be a good thing. Large militaries can be dangerous to the freedoms of the general populace (historically speaking... for recent examples, note Iraq.) But a strong country needs a strong military. It's an interesting balance. I believe we have the most professional and honorable military ever to be fielded, however.

And that said, welcome to the fold! If I can give one piece of advice, just remember as an officer in any MOS that you're an officer first, MOS second, and you'll do fine. Oh, and the ChAir Force may have PILOTS, but the Navy has AVIATORS. :p
But your chow is better. :(

Good luck at OTS!

Cade
 

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I just can't wait until there's world peace and all that technology goes into sports cars!!!

Anyhow, you're a lucky guy, slope. Congrats on getting in. I hope you enjoy it!

I wanted to be a Navy pilot myself in high school, but couldn't get in because I'm epileptic.
 

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Slope,
Congrats with my heartfelt jelousy. I almost went to the academy alas, glasses at admission physical yada yada yada...my hat is off to you.
 

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Congrats Slope,

Did they tell you where you are going to UPT yet? I went to Hell Rio. Which wasn't too bad a time actually. And it is only 160 miles from the nearest Lotus dealer (Gonzaba in San Antonio).

But it's a great job no matter what MDS you end up flying. I'm sure that pulling G's and dropping bombs is fun, but there is something to be said for fresh brewed coffee and fresh baked cinnamon rolls like we had on my flight in the tanker on Tuesday.

And since you're on your way to OTS, I have to add the obligatory "GO GUARD!!!" :D
 

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Congratulations

The Air and Sea show is in 2 weeks in Ft Lauderdale. I went a few years ago and they had fighter jets fly straight up, stall the engines, and then fall back towards the ground. Just before they looked like they were going to hit the ground, they would pull up and go straight up like a rocket. It was amazing to see how well the planes handled, but for what they cost they should be able to do anything. My ex co-worker drives tanks for the National Guard, they weight several tons and can go almost 65 mph. The technology that goes into some of the military equiptment is unbelieveable. I just hope they dont decide to make Humvees that can go 2000 miles and stop on dime, or we will all be road kill!

Slope., If you are going to be in San Antonio, go to the Riverwalk thats downtown. I used to go to college around there and it was pretty nice.
 

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xxxotic said:
they had fighter jets fly straight up, stall the engines, and then fall back towards the ground.
They didn't stall the engines, they stalled the planes. "Stall" means stop in an uncontrolled fashion, so when the plane comes to a complete stop due to gravity, that's called a stall. When the engine stops due to some external force, that's also called a stall. If they stalled the engines, they'd be in some deep doggy doo, though :)
 

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Good for you. Green over here.

Had a congressional appt. lined up and was heart set on the Academy, but imperfect vision kept me out of the front seat. Even now, F16's screaming across the sky leave me a bit wistful.
 

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transio said:
They didn't stall the engines, they stalled the planes. "Stall" means stop in an uncontrolled fashion, so when the plane comes to a complete stop due to gravity, that's called a stall. When the engine stops due to some external force, that's also called a stall. If they stalled the engines, they'd be in some deep doggy doo, though :)
I though they just shut off the engines and restarted them. If they can fly straight up like a rocket, why would gravity stop them? Does gravity increase the higher up you go? If you are at 200 feet off the ground and go up to 400 feet, why would it be different from going from 10000 ft to 10200 feet? I thought lack of enough air or oxygen to ignite the fuel was might what cause them to stall or at least that this is why propellor planes stall. Dont they have to turn on the ignition or whatever planes have to restart the engine after this happens?

Isnt that why rockets use solid fuel so that their is no oxygen involved?

Any rockets scientists out there that can explain this?
 

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They could just pull back on the throttle to stall the plane. I don't think they actually have to stall the engines. Max thrust may push the plane straight up, but in most planes, that's not the case... it's only momentum plus thrust pushing it up (the momentum is delivered through the wings, based upon the forward velocity of the aircraft). Although an F16 CAN accelerate vertically, it doesn't HAVE to. I'm sure you've seen at shows when they sometimes fly the F16 on it's ass.... hovering around on it's thrust.... it's all about throttle control.

Gravity doesn't increase as you go up, it decreases (though not noticeably). Gravity = M1 * M2 / d^2 (I think) - been a whlie since I've taken physics, but it's increasing the distance between the masses decreases gravity.
 

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I'm not a rocket scientist, but Transio isn't 'quite' right. And for the record the following explanation isn't 'quite' perfect either. A stall isn't necessarily loss of control, that's a side effect. A stall is a loss of laminar airflow over the lifting surfaces of an aircraft. Without enough laminar airflow, no lift. It is typically caused by high angles of attack. Stalling an engine is the same thing. The turbine blades or propellers at a high angle of attack can lose their airflow, and stop generating thrust... in effect simply windmilling with no air being pushed. For a turbine engine, this is a self defeating condition, as it uses a portion of the thrust to keep the compressors working, and the engine turning. Transio is totally right that they are not stalling the engines during that maneuver, at least not on purpose! They stick the nose of the plane in the air, and begin to pull power back. As the airplane slows, airflow over the wings decreases to the point where the airplane is not generating enough lift, and it stalls. In a true vertical climb, all the lift is generated by thrust, and once thrust is reduced to less than needed to keep the airplane moving straight up, it stalls. These type of stalls can be very controllable, depending on the aircraft, and the control inputs you feed it as you begin the stall. Slope, you're going to get to do stalls plenty during flight training. Some guys love it, others just get airsick.
Using a stall to initiate a spin used to be used heavily in the first world war. If a pilot needed to descend through heavy clouds, and couldn't find an opening, he'd kick the plane into a stall/nose down spin, rapidly descending through the clouds (and lessening his chances of hitting mountains) and hoping he'd break out of the clouds in time to pull out and keep flying.

Probably the most dangerous type of stall is the approach turn stall, and it's a condition on landing, (low level) where as you turn towards the runway, (low power) an improper set of inputs can cause you to stall the airflow over the wings, and it'll put you in the dirt very quickly and upside down (in many aircraft). But the point is that it is possible to stall an aircraft in (almost) level flight.

Hope this helps some. Lumn8r can clarify more than I can.

Cade
 

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I just want to clarify a couple of things.

1. Airplanes can aerodynamically stall at any Attitude, Altitude, and Airspeed. Not negotiable.

2. They do not shut of there engines to restart them for anything other then emergencies or operation necessity.

3. Propeller aircraft are not exclusive to piston engines, i.e. “turbo props”. Propeller aircraft are more efficient then jet aircraft at lower altitudes. Jet engines are more efficient for higher altitudes and speeds. High Bypass Fan Engines used by many airliners today are a sort of compromise and use principles of propeller and jet technologies.

4. Motorcades explanations are pretty good. His reference to "improper controls" for an "approach to turn stall" (actually an approach to landing stall), refer to uncoordinated flight (cross controlling). This is when the tail of the aircraft is not following through the same flight path with the nose of the aircraft (think understeer / oversteer). This can increase stall speed all while you are slowing down and low to the ground…very bad. This is mainly do to the lack of altitude to correct the condition then anything else. To initiate a spin the plane must first have one stalled wing. Followed by the aggrevation of uncoordinated flight. If such a condition persist a full spin will develop. Motorcades description of initiating the stall by "kicking the plane" is really refering to the second step of the process which is uncoordinated flight initiated by stepping on the rudder pedals that control yaw or side to side movement of the plane.

5. Transio stated: "Stall" means stop in an uncontrolled fashion, so when the plane comes to a complete stop due to gravity, that's called a stall.... This is not correct and a very common missunderatanding amoungst student pilots. Always remember a stall can occur at any airpeed. The defining element is as Motorcade previously mentioned. Stall occurs only when the critical angle of attack is exceeded (airflow can no longer remain laminer and becomes turbulent to the surfuce of the wing) This reduces the pressure differential between the bottom and top of the wing thus increasing drag and reducing lift substantially. The speed at which this occurs is variable depending on other flight conditions and is never a fixed speed number and not exclusive to zero.

Most of this misunderstanding comes from the media’s incessant miss information with reporting planes to having stalled and crashed. This is too general. As we know there are aerodynamic stalls that occur on the airframe, and also ones that occur within the engine a jet engine ie compressor stall. Too confuse it even further it is a very common use of the word to describe a piston engine (i.e car) having quit or “stalled out” which is a totaly different thing alltogether.
 

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I just want to clarify that when I said "stop in an uncontrolled fashion", I didn't mean that the plane was out of control. I meant that it wasn't something done by controls (as in brakes), but by external forces.

Dictionary definition of stall is "To halt the motion or progress of; bring to a standstill."

I didn't realize you could "stall" a plane at speed, since it doesn't really stop.

It also doesn't make sense that you can prevent laminar airflow at low speeds. If you look at Skin Friction Coefficient values, the amount of relative laminar airflow increases as you approach a Reynolds number of 0. That means that at infinite minimal speed, you're at 100% laminar flow. At infinite speed, on the other hand, you're 100% turbulent. In the middle of real-world Re numbers, you' get a mix of the two. The way I understand it, the only way to stop laminar flow at low speeds is to stop completely, thus preventing all air flow (relative to the wings).

Of course, I'm likely totally misunderstanding, since I have 0 experience with aircraft.
 
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