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Well, new to me anyway. Just got a '73 Land Rover Series III and so happy to have a vehicle that doesn't have all of the electronic gizmos and nannies that so many of the more modern cars have. In that regard, it seems to share some of the same ethos that the lotus has.
It'll also be a great vehicle to learn more about working on cars since everything is mechanical - no laptop required to flash an ECU.
 

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Yup, tuning ignition is changing springs and weights. Tuning fueling is carburetor jets and clearances. The downsides are that stuff wears in normal use and has to be regularly adjusted, and there's no feedback correction for changing atmospheric conditions (or anything, for that matter).

What kind of carburetor does it have?
 

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It's got a weber, but that's about all I can tell you about it. :)

I do plan on updating a few systems - better headlights, electronic ignition so I don't have to worry about points and other things like that. I've also got switches that I can't figure out what they do, so I'll need a wiring diagram. Still waiting for the shop manual to arrive and that should help. Looking forward to experimenting with stuff and learning. I know my dad used to work on his cars and he showed me how to change my oil and brakes when I was just learning to drive, but that was about the extent of my experience.
 

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It's got a weber, but that's about all I can tell you about it. :)
And that is a great place to start. An OEM Weber is still better than just about any other carburetor. An aftermarket Weber (with aluminum body and nicer machining) is better still. Either way, you'll be able to tweak the tuning to whatever you want. I'm guessing it's a two bbl progressive, given that this is a small truck engine. I presume it has manual choke and a hand throttle?

I do plan on updating a few systems - better headlights, electronic ignition so I don't have to worry about points and other things like that. I've also got switches that I can't figure out what they do, so I'll need a wiring diagram. Still waiting for the shop manual to arrive and that should help. Looking forward to experimenting with stuff and learning. I know my dad used to work on his cars and he showed me how to change my oil and brakes when I was just learning to drive, but that was about the extent of my experience.
Wiring diagram will be trivially simple for something that old. Whenever you have the opportunity, inspect connectors and apply a conductive anticorrosive compound like OX-GARD (used for house wiring, available at your home improvement big box store) to the connector points. Most electrical problems on older cars are caused by increasing resistance at connectors or switch contacts as things oxidize. This is exacerbated by the fact that most connectors are exposed to the elements to some degree, so even atmospheric moisture promotes some oxidation.

Be careful with uprated headlights until you know that the wiring can cope with whatever loads you apply - great way to smoke wiring, connectors, or the headlamp switch. You might want to install a relay harness.

My favorite retrofit electronic ignition is the Pertronix Ignitor family. Simple, small, and unobtrusive. Not perfect for high revving high performance engines (there's a little timing inaccuracy caused by variations on the magnet ring), but for a Landy it should be just the ticket. Be sure to check the point plate bushings (pivot and vacuum capsule) for slop and repair/replace as necessary. This is worth a lot of consistency and economy. You'll also want to verify that the vacuum advance actually works and is hooked to the ported vacuum port on the carburetor. That's worth a lot of part throttle fuel economy, which in turn helps with engine oil dilution, among other things.
 

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Thanks so much for the tips!
That's one thing that I like so much about this forum is not just the depth of knowledge but the breadth too! And the community that's more than happy to help out!
 
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