The Lotus Cars Community banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
OK, it is something induced but, why can I remove a screw where the caliper wasn't leaking, put it back in place and the leaking won't stop. I was changing my pads and did not know how to push the piston back in. A quick check on the list solved that but, the screw in question that I thought was a relieve valve or something with parking brake to allow piston to go back in will not stop leaking. It looks like it seats into something. I'll post pics in about an hour I hope before all the fluid leaks out:panic: How do I reseat the screw properly?

Thanks in advance

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
OK, it is something induced but, why can I remove a screw where the caliper wasn't leaking, put it back in place and the leaking won't stop. I was changing my pads and did not know how to push the piston back in. A quick check on the list solved that but, the screw in question that I thought was a relieve valve or something with parking brake to allow piston to go back in will not stop leaking. It looks like it seats into something. I'll post pics in about an hour I hope before all the fluid leaks out:panic: How do I reseat the screw properly?

Thanks in advance

Jeff

There should be what looks like a small ball bearing that sits under the valve... When you pulled the fitting out the ball may have fallen out. Check the floor around where you were working..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
There should be what looks like a small ball bearing that sits under the valve... When you pulled the fitting out the ball may have fallen out. Check the floor around where you were working..
Thanks, going to look. Makes perfect sense. Keep yall posted.

Jeff
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,592 Posts
For future reference (and for others) there is no need to "open the system" when changing the pads. You just use needle nose pliers to screw in the rear piston.

You will need to properly bleed the brake system now that you have air in it though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,355 Posts
-poke- What SweetDaddy said - Burp that system until the air bubbles stop and cycle it a couple more times for good measure!
 

·
insert clever title here
Joined
·
7,702 Posts
For future reference (and for others) there is no need to "open the system" when changing the pads. You just use needle nose pliers to screw in the rear piston.
Not necessarily...if you've added any fluid to the system since the last brake fluid change, then if you don't open the system, fluid may overflow the reservoir when you push the pistons back in. In that case, you can either open a bleeder valve to release some fluid (which can then introduce bubbles into the system), or just use a turkey baster or similar device to suck some fluid out of the master cylinder reservoir (the recommended approach).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I think I may have temporarily stopped it up until I can find the right check ball at the dealer. Don't yall laugh too hard, but I used one of the ball bearings from my Craftsman plastic socket tree, the little spring loaded ball that holds the socket on the tree. It looks like its actually holding it from leaking for now!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
OK, didn't work, then did more research on the web and found this:

How to Rebuild a Brembo Caliper - SELOC TechWiki

No ball needed. The screw has to go farther in the hole as it is on the side I didn't mess with. I'm going to have to rotate the parking brake mechanism to find the slot in the disk in these pics I found.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top