The Lotus Cars Community banner

Vinyl, PVC, or nothing....

  • Spend the money ($1200) and go with PVC

    Votes: 4 50.0%
  • Save money and burn the fingers, go with Vinyl

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Ahhh, hell with it, let the garage go to pot.

    Votes: 4 50.0%

  • Total voters
    8
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So guys, I'm looking for opinions on my 20x20 garage floor.

I'm considering the PVC self locking floating tiles, or the vinyl stick on flooring.

Anyone have any thoughts or ideas about this?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,955 Posts
Peel and stick tiles might come up due to tire heat.

I had a concrete floor and used garage floor paint from Home Depot, but it still peeled in spots, however my neighbor used concrete stain and did not have any problems. He said he used a zylene stain so it stunk like hell for a week, and as a unknown side effect the odor probably killed any bugs in the house too, but he did it before he moved in.

I used concrete stain on the walkway for my house and got a color that matches the cement driveway, and it is holding up great. It doesnt get any mold on it and I pressure wash it every 4 months to keep it clean. The key is to use a concrete primer before apply the stain so that it increases the adhesion.

Since I have a minor oil leak, I went to Costco and got a package that had 2 15X20 heavy vinyl tarps, blue on one side, silver on the other, and they fit perfectly in my garage when I put them next to each other. It was $15 bucks and when they get dirty I just take them out into the driveway and hose them off. And it keeps the floor underneath clean too.

Another neighbor paid $100 for a parking mat for his Corvette which is only big enough for one car 10 ft X 20 Ft and the thing is a piece of junk. It is ripped and melted in spots from the heat of the tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,577 Posts
One of my buddies has the interlocking mats. Once a year or two he pulls them up in strips and hoses them off outside. I guess they've been in there for over a decade and they still look new to me. They're thick with holes in them, so the only real disadvantage is that small nuts and bolts can fall through and you have to find them and fish them out. They look nice though and they're obviously quite durable. We use jacks/jackstands all the time and they're not damaged at all. I doubt you could weld over them though...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,607 Posts
Where do you get these interlocking mats? are they cost effective?

We have a concrete garage floor and if it gets wet it like a skating rink. Its also getting ugly from stains and such. I was considering a concrete coating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,577 Posts
I don't know where this guy got his. I know there's a product called RaceDeck that are very similar, but I've heard that it's quite expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,634 Posts
Spend the money, go with the good stuff,

C'mon, you know you want to !

I was pretty close to going with this one:

http://www.flooringadventures.com/prices.htm

They sent me a sample box and I really like the stuff, but I ended up deciding to go the epoxy-coating route. It'll be a bit of a cleaner look, not as industrial (which I can see being both a good and a not-so-good thing), mostly I think the epoxy (professionally applied) will look good for a long time and be nice and easy to clean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
mikester said:
but I ended up deciding to go the epoxy-coating route. It'll be a bit of a cleaner look, not as industrial (which I can see being both a good and a not-so-good thing), mostly I think the epoxy (professionally applied) will look good for a long time and be nice and easy to clean.
Yeah, I was in Lowes yesterday and saw the Rust-O-leum brand of epoxy. It was in a kit with cleaner and pretty little chips. $60 a gallon.

It looks like an easier process than the Griots Garage floor paint which asks for all kinds of time and work..
 

·
insert clever title here
Joined
·
7,702 Posts
Genjuro said:
It looks like an easier process than the Griots Garage floor paint which asks for all kinds of time and work..
Carefull! The Griot's approach is sound and logical. Anything less is likely to be unreliable. I've heard bad things about cheap garage floor paint (no specific brand comes to mind though). I researched this extensively a year ago, and found that the single most important factor is good surface preparation. I ultimately abandoned this idea because the thought of hydrocholoric acid being splashed up against my nice wood walls (which mount directly to the garage slab), then hosing that all down and getting the walls even wetter, wasn't that appealing. Not to mention that all that HCL would be washed out onto the driveway, etching only parts of it until it finally makes it to the street (a legal way of disposing of that stuff due to dillution)...leaving a long 'racing stripe' on my driveway where it flowed. Additionally, my slab is not sealed underneath - meaning, moisture can and does come up from underneath (which would break the bonds of the floor paint).

I'm currently pursuing a dual-surface method. The under-car area will be a large, grooved rubber mat from Griot's Garage (gray). The rest of the garage will be blue indoor/outdoor carpet.
 

·
Supporting Vendor
Joined
·
4,113 Posts
Genjuro said:
Yeah, I was in Lowes yesterday and saw the Rust-O-leum brand of epoxy. It was in a kit with cleaner and pretty little chips. $60 a gallon.

It looks like an easier process than the Griots Garage floor paint which asks for all kinds of time and work..
Steer clear of the Lowes/H.Depot crap in a can. I made the mistake of believing their salesman who told me it will never lift. Guess what, it lifted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,634 Posts
Shinoo and Matt are 100 percent correct. I have used the Griot's Garage Industrial Floor Paint (Epoxy), followed the directions and had great results. My floor is about 6 years old now and beginning to show signs of wear, but it's been a very durable floor. There's still plenty of life in it but my wife and I are ready to "upgrade" so we're taking it to the next level. But for the DYI'er, I highly recommend the Griot's paint, it hasn't lifted once.

BTW, I agree with Matt about the "etching" part of the prep, which is very scary. What I did instead of using muriatic acid was to buy a somewhat safer, less toxic (supposedly) concrete etching product that was also (opf course) more expensive, but I did not die, and as far as I know no endangered species were harmed in the creation of my epoxy floor. ;)

For anyone going this route, reserve a long weekend for the job - I can pretty much guarantee that unless you've done it before, it will take longer than you expect. But once it's all done, it is great and you'll be very happy with it. Just don't try to cut any corners, follow the directions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,955 Posts
Do not use a mop if you etch with muratic acid. It eats right thru the fibers of the mop and leaves little stringy pieces that stick to the concrete. Get a brush that is made for use with acids instead.

That acid is dangerous... It sizzles, turns green and smokes up when you put it on concrete. I think it is similar to sulfuric acid.
Make sure you have a hose nearby and wear heavy vinyl boots, like firemen or fishermen wear, so it doesnt seep thru your sneakers and burn your feet too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,577 Posts
xxxotic said:
That acid is dangerous... It sizzles, turns green and smokes up when you put it on concrete. I think it is similar to sulfuric acid.
Make sure you have a hose nearby and wear heavy vinyl boots, like firemen or fishermen wear, so it doesnt seep thru your sneakers and burn your feet too.
Muriatic acid IS sulfuric acid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,955 Posts
NMRJock said:
Muriatic acid IS sulfuric acid.
OK, so I'm not good at chemisty. The bottle I have says Muratic acid on it, but on the bottom it says HCL on it, so I guess hydrochloric acid is the same thing. I thought sulfuric acid would have Su listed as a chemical compound:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
That's about right...

Muriatic acid is the old name for Hydrochloric acid (HCl). Sulphuric acid would be H2 SO4 . See "Oil of Vitriol"...:)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
901 Posts
Genjuro:


FYI! The national Lotus owners club, Lotus Ltd. has a discount program with Kiwi Tile and Precision Epoxy for our members. The savings on these and other products will more then pay for your membership in Lotus Ltd.

Membership has its privileges! If you'd like to join the club and enjoy these and other benefits see our web site to join on line or e-mail [email protected] for a membership form.

Mark Pfeffer - Treasurer Lotus Ltd.

Join Lotus Ltd. North America's Largest Lotus Owners Club
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top