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I've noticed on a lot of esprit videos and with my own that it usually takes a few seconds for the car to crank. Is there a particular reason why?
 

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I've noticed a trend that seems to show that the fuel pumps are starting to get old, and may not be holding rail pressure after the engine is shut off. If the engine starts faster after priming the fuel pump to build pressure, then that would be the cause. Mine definitely starts quicker if I cycle the fuel pump a couple of times before starting, even with a new pump.

Otherwise, I know the ECU on the GM MP4 electronic injection cars doesn't take over from the coil packs until above 700 rpm, so there may be something inherent with the GM coil pack that takes a bit longer.
 

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You'll probably find that it takes longer to crank and start when the engine is hot. With a cold start the V8 usually fires right up. There's been a few threads on here about hot start problems and the several fixes that are available and seem to work.
 

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Since it seems to be somewhat common, It's probably related to crank shaft and camshaft position sensor synchronzation in the ecu. Alot of people with aem v1 standalones have longer than average crank times.
 

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My 83 definitely starts quicker when it's cold. When warm I let the fuel pump run for a few seconds before starting the car. It's still slow to start but it's quicker than starting without 'priming' the fuel system first.

I replaced the fuel pump last year (along with a lot of other stuff, but that's another thread)
 

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Cal H
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Priming the pump will help and I am not sure if the Esprit like many EFI cars have a check valve that holds fuel rail pressure when the engine is off. In many of the cars that do have such a check valve when they get old they get a little leaky and the rail pressure will drop. In those instances letting the pump run a bit before fire up will make it start faster.
 

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The 88 CFI cars do have a fuel pressure accumulator. This keeps pressure in the lines when the pumps shut of.

The CFI cars take a bit to fire - but no more than a carb car in my experience.

Cameron
 

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The ECU has to see a lot of signals before it will fire the coils. The very best thing you can do is to keep the battery as charged up as you can. That means if the battery is old replace it. If you do not drive the car frequently use a battery tender every other week for a day. With my V-8 is was VERY difficult to restart once it got hot. Turned out to be leaky primary fuel injectors. On the V-8 the ECU has to see a minimum cranking speed before it will start. With a weak battery or an engine full of unburnt fuel you can't spin it fast enough long enough. Now my car fires up quickly hot or cold.
David Teitelbaum
 

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My hot start issue was due to a bad terminal on each coil pack. The two ignition wires were so badly corroded that they broke right off when I tried to pull them out of the coil. I tried all the other remedies before solving the problem. Even had the original injectors tested thinking it was due to leaky injectors. Replaced both coils and all ignition wires. Now the engine starts right up the way it should. For most of the remedies tried, see the thread polling owners on time taken to start after engine gets hot. Start with the lower cost/simple remedies and work your way up. Good luck.
 
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