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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #3
Whew! When I read the title of this thread, I thought maybe you sawed off both your legs!

Let us know how it works out!
Legs still intact!...:clap:

So far it's been fabulous; no strain on engine starts. :cool:
 

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It really depends on how you use your car. If you daily drive it, the battery will remain charged. If you take breaks between usage, the charge will run lot and probably not start your car after a couple weeks. There are things in the car that drain the battery while parked... namely, the alarm.

If you have a Rev400 installed, you might be in trouble too if you do a lot of hot stops... if you are auto-xing for example. There's no way a small battery could run the heat exchanger pump and fans while the car decided to cool down. As it is, my full size battery will run dead at auto-xes. :( Single driver at national events means roughly 30 min. between runs. When it's hot and the course is fast and long, the damn thing will run forever while cooling down. Do this three times in a short period and you're asking for a push start to get out of grid. I should probably rig a switch.... Phil could probably help with that one.
 

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shay2nak
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how long between starts will it last?
 

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In my experience, it depends. :) I've been running tiny batteries in cars since 2005 and it's really important to get a good first charge in the battery at the right rate with an appropriate charger. That's made the biggest difference.

In my CRX it could make it about a week between starts but the CRX was also very simple and had no alarm.

It's probably best to just buy the right small charger and maybe have a jump box in your garage to get it started the first time to leave your house. After a short drive around, it should be fine again.

YMMV
 

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Weight = 3.15lbs. :D
Length 6 7/8
Width 3 7/16
Height 5 1/8
Gained some space too!
Nice! What type of bracket did you use?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nice! What type of bracket did you use?
No bracket required. Just used industrial strength velcro; actually 3M/Scotch All Weather Fasteners. Don't need a lot; it's only holding 3 lbs.

I've done some spirited driving, and curiously opened the cover to check several times; no movement, and just as secure as before the drive.

Oh, and the battery cover was retired as well! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #10
how long between starts will it last?
About three days. I let it go five, and the alarm became 'grumpy' (it went off!! :mad:)
A battery tender is definitely warranted. I have a NOCO Genius G1100 (the recommended charger for this batt).
 

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I wouldn't put it on a tender. I would put a battery cut off switch instead. Just cut the power when your not using it. In fact you never ever want that battery to be completely drained. Probably best bang for the buck you can do tho :)
 

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The whole velcro "tie down" sounds like a nice added weight reduction.
 

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Whew! When I read the title of this thread, I thought maybe you sawed off both your legs!

Let us know how it works out!
I think one leg would have probably been enough. Maybe throw an arm in if you're light.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I wouldn't put it on a tender. I would put a battery cut off switch instead. Just cut the power when your not using it. In fact you never ever want that battery to be completely drained. Probably best bang for the buck you can do tho :)
I considered that; but having to reprogram the stereo every time is a huge hassle factor. So I went with tender option......simple and it works.
 

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I considered that; but having to reprogram the stereo every time is a huge hassle factor. So I went with tender option......simple and it works.
Gotcha just unhook the battery if your away from your tender for a long duration of time. The draw of the cars alarm will make that thing null and void in probably less than a day or two. Not sure how many amp hours the battery is rated for but these batteries are seriously amazing, have one in every toy I own, not ready for the DD tho.
 

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I'm getting a little tired of posting this, but I put a 3 lb "Ballistic Evo2" 16 cell battery in my Elise 6 months ago and it works better than the big lead anchor it replaced. Lasts 2 weeks without a tender. There's really no other reason to experiment with anything else.
 

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I'm getting a little tired of posting this, but I put a 3 lb "Ballistic Evo2" 16 cell battery in my Elise 6 months ago and it works better than the big lead anchor it replaced. Lasts 2 weeks without a tender. There's really no other reason to experiment with anything else.
I always had the impression that Li batteries had a relatively short useable lifespan. You could potentially have to replace this battery more often than a traditional dry cell unit. Do you have any info of how man cranking amps the battery will supply in it's degraded capacity? What about the heat generated from not only hot sunny days, but the engine as well, Li doesn't like to be hot at all. What about general maintenance, any special concerns that need to be addressed?

I'm not saying it's a bad purchase, just would like to get some facts together.
 

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I always had the impression that Li batteries had a relatively short useable lifespan. You could potentially have to replace this battery more often than a traditional dry cell unit. Do you have any info of how man cranking amps the battery will supply in it's degraded capacity? What about the heat generated from not only hot sunny days, but the engine as well, Li doesn't like to be hot at all. What about general maintenance, any special concerns that need to be addressed?

I'm not saying it's a bad purchase, just would like to get some facts together.
It sounds like you're familiar with "LiPo" batteries, which are really Lithium Cobalt Oxide (LiCoO2)

These batteries are Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4) rather than the older LiPo chemistry from R/C vehicles, laptops, 787s, and so on.

They're a lot safer - they don't catch fire easily or burn well readily if short circuited or overcharged like a LiPo will, which is why they don't need an expensive built-in charge management system for auto use.

Additionally, LiFePO4 degrades MUCH more slowly than older-style lithium polymer batteries. The lifespan to 70% capacity is often cited as 7 years, and they don't degrade rapidly when warm or 100% full like a LiPo will.

With that being said LiFePO4 batteries have only really reached normal market channels in the last 3-4 years, so there's not a lot of anecdotal data about how long the batteries sold for automotive use actually last. I've had a set of two LiFePO4 cells in an electric bike I built a few years ago and they've held up great so far.
 

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It sounds like you're familiar with "LiPo" batteries, which are really Lithium Cobalt Oxide (LiCoO2)

These batteries are Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4) rather than the older LiPo chemistry from R/C vehicles, laptops, 787s, and so on.

They're a lot safer - they don't catch fire easily or burn well readily if short circuited or overcharged like a LiPo will, which is why they don't need an expensive built-in charge management system for auto use.

Additionally, LiFePO4 degrades MUCH more slowly than older-style lithium polymer batteries. The lifespan to 70% capacity is often cited as 7 years, and they don't degrade rapidly when warm or 100% full like a LiPo will.

With that being said LiFePO4 batteries have only really reached normal market channels in the last 3-4 years, so there's not a lot of anecdotal data about how long the batteries sold for automotive use actually last. I've had a set of two LiFePO4 cells in an electric bike I built a few years ago and they've held up great so far.
Hmmm, that's all rather good news. One more question... what about over charging? I know a lot of Li charging systems have a built in charge shut off mechanism.
 
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