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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
FIXED UPDATE: Both noises eliminated with lubbing of rubber boot at the bottom of the steering shaft at the firewall.

Heads up, I'm the guy that Trackspec initially diagnosed and replaced the subframe bolts for the clicking noises in the thread https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f170/steering-wheel-click-sevice-bulletin-117914/index4.html. After almost a year of peace and quiet, the noises are back. Although I don't doubt the fix to the noise was indeed in the tightening of the subframe, it looks like overtime, the subframe might have flexed and worked itself loose, so the bolts and tightening might just be a bandage to the issue. Anyone ran into this issue and have managed to fix it permanently?

My noise documentations in 2 parts:

1) Starts up in cold weather (45F), the ticking noise sounds like wind-up toys gear ticking that you can feel and hear right behind the steering wheel.


2) Once warmed, ticking noises went away mostly, but then you hear squealings instead. No power steering fluid lost.

 

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Hmm. I had a subframe bolt problem with my 2012, but it didn't sound anything like those noises. Your sounds went away after the bolts were changed/tightened? Did they show you the problem? In my case, it was obvious where the issue was because you could see where the bolt head and washer had moved eccentrically around the hole in the frame. My ticking sound did not seem to come from the wheel, but down inside the frame/wheelwell area, etc. and yours does seem to be coming from the steering wheel area. I think there have been posts here about a steering wheel ticking issue. Maybe you have/had both problems? I did not have a squealing/whooshing sound like that, which also seems to be coming from inside the steering column area.
 

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The rapid clicking in the first video sound like the "clock spring" or something in the steering wheel. I get the same ticking on very cold days, that's only one or two days a year here in Texas, and goes away once the interior warms a up little.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
clock spring replacement was one of the first thing the dealer did to try to fix spaced out popping noises 3 years ago, followed by rack/pinion replacement, the later did fix.

For this different ticking issue last year, when we replaced and tighten the subframe bolts, all sounds went away for almost a whole entire year, so I think that addressed some part of the issue. What I notice though, is that the ticking sounds only come on at the start of the day. After the first drive (around 4 miles to the office), the ticking sound went away almost completely for the rest of the day, despite sitting unused for 6-8 hours in between, until it sits overnight. The next day the cycle starts again. What I'm thinking of, and this might totally be completely wrong, is as if the steering system is emptied of any power steering fluid overnight, and would make that ticking noise until it is completely lubricated with steering fluid after the first drive. Of course this is just me guessing out of my butt and has no real mechanic education of any kind.
 
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What I'm thinking of, and this might totally be completely wrong, is as if the steering system is emptied of any power steering fluid overnight, and would make that ticking noise until it is completely lubricated with steering fluid after the first drive. Of course this is just me guessing out of my butt and has no real mechanic education of any kind.
Having had a semi-catastrophic power steering failure on my Evora, I can't say I remember hearing any ticking noises like the first video. The pump made a horrific moaning sound and the rack made a metal-on-metal scraping sound.
 

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Xymo, believe me, it's nothing so serious as the subframe.

The first video is the clockspring, as Bob says. No need to replace it again -- there was no need to replace it the first time either. What you're hearing is the little flat cable inside (think of the cables you would see when you open up a printer or something: ribbon cables) rubbing against the round housing that it's held inside. Perfectly normal, if annoying.

The fix is a little squirt of silicone lube. A little squirt of silicone lube. That is, you don't want to put too much of anything in there, or it will be dripping on you for ages, and it absolutely must not be oil-based. Silicone is dielectric, while oil can cause all kinds of trouble with electrics.

I have done this to my 2011, so I know it's safe -- and I know it'll fix your noise if you get just a little bit of silicone in the right place. No need to worry about the subframe, rack, or any other expensive parts. That sound is distinctive, and I am 100% certain.

As for the second video's sound, Chromy might be right, but you might find that giving the clockspring a squirt fixes that too. If not, squirt the same stuff on the rubber boot that he mentions as well.

I'll be towing my 2011 through Cali in the next few days (moving cross-country) so if you run into trouble with the fix let me know -- we could meet up along I5 someplace and get you sorted out.
 

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Not uncommon. My noises were eliminated with a shot of lube to the rubber gaiter. They also tended to go away once the car warmed. They have not returned since being lubricated with silicon grease. IO use it on my window seals as well as they make a very small rustling sound in cold weather
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Update: At recommendations from chrome orange, i gave a single wd40 squirt into the rubber boot at the base of the column at the firewall, and both the ticking that's identified as clock spring, and the squealing, went away completely. I will go and relub it with silicon grease tomorrow. Thank you all. You guys are totally awesome. So now that that's sorted, I'd like to understand the issue. Is the column shaft just binding against the rubber boot, creating the ticking? How are they cause-and-effect? I can understand why on the squealing, but not why the tickings. Having the sounds travel up the shaft makes it sound like the sounds were coming directly behind the steering wheel.
 
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I can understand why on the squealing, but not why the tickings. Having the sounds travel up the shaft makes it sound like the sounds were coming directly behind the steering wheel.
Because they are. :) I'm glad they've gone away, but "the tickings" are definitely clockspring: if you have a clockspring assembly in your hands, you can recreate the noise.

On my car, they would come and go, and it wasn't until I bought a spare clockspring (for another purpose) and opened it up that I figured out what was going on.

But as long as it isn't making noise, who cares? Now you can get back to enjoying your Evora!
 

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The fix is a little squirt of silicone lube. A little squirt of silicone lube. That is, you don't want to put too much of anything in there, or it will be dripping on you for ages, and it absolutely must not be oil-based. Silicone is dielectric, while oil can cause all kinds of trouble with electrics.
A shot of red rubber grease into the rubber boot worked for me.
If what West-of-Hethel says is true, sounds like Red Rubber Grease is NOT what you’d want to use. From the description of Red Rubber Grease: “CASTROL RED RUBBER GREASE is a specialty lubricant manufactured from castor oil (a natural vegetable oil) and a bentone thickener (micro-fine powder derived from a common mineral clay called bentonite) with a red dye added for identification, and with additives for corrosion and oxidation resistance.”

I’m thinking there must be a better option.
 

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I think the rubber grease is ok for the rubber boot -- I was talking just about the clockspring, which contains wiring. The clockspring's at the top of the column, directly behind the steering wheel, while the rubber boot is at the firewall and is not in contact with any electrical stuff.

(Though I like silicone for interior rubber bits too, as it's less messy than grease.)
 
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