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Discussion Starter #1
My A/C is not blowing cold air... (but the fan blows). I did get the gas recharged, but still there's no cold air, and I don't hear the clutch engaging... Probably an A/C compressor failure. :mad:

The Lotus OEM A/C compressor is about $1,300-1,400, but I've seen most of the Toyota/Denso parts going for about $300-400...

Do you know if the Toyota/Denso part would work? If so, which part #...?

Thanks!!!
 

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We are direct with Denso, but I have not come up with a part number for the exact compressor with clutch in the U.S. The problem is with the clutch diameter. That said you may be jumping the gun, check further before condemning the compressor.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What are some of the things to check and/or look for? I did check the fuse, and it looks good.

Thank you!
 

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It is a Denso MC447220-4351.
Michael
Numbers found on the original compressor are not used for ordering, at least not in the U.S. In this case this number is also not in the Denso cross reference data base.
 

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I've got a whole bunch of these compressors in good used take off condition and they are all OEM Lotus. If you need one, PM me and I'll sell you one cheap.

Edit 5/24/14 - I just sold the last of my compressors so hopefully someone can come up with an aftermarket source for them.
 

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That is the number given in a google search, however try this 471-1329
DENSO Aftermarket Online Catalog Search | Vehicle Parts Search
Michael
The 471-1329 is from the 10S15 series of compressors. The compressor on the Elige is from the SCSA06 series, very different. When I got one for Bane's MR2 spyder last year, I thought I had found it, but the clutch was a different size.

fwiw, the long Denso # on the compressor body of my car is 447220-6364.
 

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The 471-1329 is from the 10S15 series of compressors. The compressor on the Elige is from the SCSA06 series, very different. When I got one for Bane's MR2 spyder last year, I thought I had found it, but the clutch was a different size.

fwiw, the long Denso # on the compressor body of my car is 447220-6364.
Thanks for that info, I had considered that it used the same compressor as any 2ZZ installation.
Michael
 

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I joined this forum so I could let you know what Denso part to use. 471-1426 will work. The pulley is somewhat larger than the original, but the belt fits just fine. there is an RPM sensor on the 471-1426 with two green wires that go into the connector- don't worry about them. This was WAY less expensive than the orig Lotus compressor plus clutch. Give it a try.
 

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The Denso 471-1426 compressor clutch is approximately 16 % larger than the clutch on the original Elige compressor. This will slow down the revolutions and the volume of refrigerant pumped by the compressor. Since this system is quite small to begin with (1.25 lbs of R134a) reduction in refrigerant flow will likely be noticeable in high ambient temperatures.
If a clutch from the original compressor on the car or another is in good condition it may be installable on the new compressor to get around that issue.
 

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Just recently replaced the compressor and few other A/C parts on my 2011 Elise SC. Myself is based in Jakarta-Indonesia and my local A/C specialist could source and match the same compressor used by the locally assembled Toyota Corolla (Altis 1800cc, which also shares similar engine). All parts are indeed made by Denso. Was skeptical with the size of the clutch and power from the new compressor. but after testing, it works fine just like the standard compressor that came with the car. My car has only done 9000km but probably because of the heat and humidity over here, the compressor weakens substantially, the heat-soak affected from the radiator to the condensor has taken its toll i guess. Price wise, i only paid 1/3 of the quoted price by the local Lotus dealer for the parts and job.
 

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How difficult of a job is this? Is it a clam on or off job? My clutch howls when not engauged, sounds like the bearings are going out. I already have the system discharged because of resistor pack stuff I'm working on, seems like a good time to get in there and swap the compressor. Am I on the right track here? or is this another multi day adventure?
 

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Revisiting an old thread to offer details on A/C replacement. I replace my compressor because it was periodically squealing.

Denso 471-1426 worked for me. Ordered from Amazon. The pulley is 16% larger, but the body is a perfect fit to the 2ZZ-GE engine.

Replacing the compressor probably took me 4 hours on an Exige S. M

I believe I did everything from underneath the car. Like most bits on the 111R, much time is spent fiddling with hard to access bolts.

Unlike a previous post, I found that my belt did NOT fit after installing the new Denso compressor given the larger pulley.

I purchased a 16mm longer belt (Gates K060764) which fit and still left plenty of compression in the tensioner.

I also replaced the drier since the system was opened. This requires removing the front clam.

So altogether, there's a lot of labor in this job to do it properly, replacing compressor and drier. Maybe 10 to 12 hours...and as long as you are in there with the drier, you should address the blower motor resistors and low quality blower electrical connector.

I am getting 48 F from the vents on a 72 F ambient sunny day.
 

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Did you really have to replace the drier? Wouldn't pulling a vacuum for an extended period of time get all of the moisture out of the system?
 

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I think replacing the drier is the correct thing to do, but one could be forgiven for skipping it seeing as the difficulty of removal vastly outweighs the cost of the drier. I don't think it will come back to bite you as long as you do keep it pulled for a while. I watched an AC guy on an older cheap car put a heat gun on the drier while drawing a vacuum and watching the gauges. An old git'er done trick I guess.
 

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I do wonder if

A: can the clutch be swapped over

B: if one was willing to fab some AC hoses if another, better compressor is available. Seeing as the last piece of the Elise/Exige AC puzzle is idle performance, I think the compressor is the problem.

just pondering..........

I did track down a Denso catalog with sizing information in PDF that I have errrr, somewhere...............so many projects so little time
 

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Pulling a vacuum for an extended time does remove plenty of moisture.

I had the front clam off anyways and had to disconnect the drier to get to the heater blower (mine had a fried electrical connector).

My research for the project yielded the conclusion that if the system is open for an extended period of time (I did cap the open pipes), one should replace the drier.

I suspect if you have the system open for a few hours only, say to replace the compressor, you will be fine without replacing the drier.
 

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I've got a Denso 471-1426 on the way. My clutch is good, so I will try swapping clutches and let you know if that works. If it does work, then we just need a source for the clutch at a better price.
 
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