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LSD poll

  • I'd like a clutch type LSD

    Votes: 14 18.4%
  • A Torsen type LSD is fine for me

    Votes: 48 63.2%
  • I don't want an LSD

    Votes: 7 9.2%
  • What's an LSD?

    Votes: 7 9.2%

  • Total voters
    76
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Discussion Starter #1
Who's in favor of seeing an LSD option on the Elise?? Maybe if enough of us would buy one, they'd make it an option. I personally would like to see a clutch type LSD for road racing and autox use, and if that is not possible, a Torsen type would be better than nothing.

Clyde - any input on this possibility??

Jeff
 

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Do clutch type diffs normally work better than Torsen type on RWD cars? I know it's partly like a religious war, but for the front of AWD cars, most people seem to find that the Torsen type works better. But I could imagine that things are very different on a RWD car, and I don't know anything about those, so I'd be interested to hear about the relative benefits.

For now I cast a vote for Torsen, but it means "whatever works best on the car". :)
 

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Torsen or Torque Sensing differential will be unable to supply any torque to the other set of wheels if one set of wheels loses traction completely. The clutch type differential does not have this 'problem'.

How Stuff Works.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Prolene - right on with the description

I've done the "1 wheel peel" many a time with the Torsen units, that's why the diff of choice for racing is the clutch type.

Jeff
 

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I voted for torsen since this will be my daily driver. The plates in a clutch type diff will wear out and not have any effect at all eventually. I'm not sure what kind of mileage and durability you get out of them but I would think the tight turns of an auto-x would like to tear one up.
 

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Rear wheel lift will likely not be a problem for me on a track, nor will ice. :eek: The Torsen unit will probably be adequate, and the longevity is important.
 

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I think I understand the fundamental features of the two types of LSDs, but it's not always obvious how they affect the real world handling of a car. From what I read about AWD cars, most people don't get very good results with clutch type differentials, most of the time they seem to be causing understeer. On the other hand, a Quaife in the front does wonders. But a RWD car is very different, so I'm not surprised if the same doesn't apply there.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's certainly true torsens last longer than the clutch diffs. If rear wheel lift isn't an issue, the torsen type should be just fine. I've never raced on a clutch type, personally. Clutch type diffs, according to my friends that use them, will last a long time if you change the fluid regularly. Any LSD option would be great, IMO. I've never had a torsen diff go bad on me.

Jeff
 

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so what type of LSD does Toyota use in their cars? Seems like a torsen unit should be OK since I don't plan to be drag racing very often, and definitely plan to stay bling-free.

anybody planning to put a woo woo whistle in the exhaust?
 

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Jay said:
so what type of LSD does Toyota use in their cars?

anybody planning to put a woo woo whistle in the exhaust?
I believe it's a Torsen.

And of course....because the whistles go wooo wooooooo
 

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I think which is best (a torsen or clutch type) in terms of performance is a difficult thing to answer. As mentioned, the clutch type doesn't require the inside wheel to be on the ground. However, one benefit of a torsen is that it can accomodate the large differences in wheel speed needed in very tight turns.
My Z06 has a very stiff clutch type LSD which causes the front to want to skip along when the wheel is at full lock with racing tires on. My S2000 has a torsen LSD and does not have this problem with racing tires on. Also, torsens are kinda complex and have many tiny parts inside. If you look on the S2000 forum you will find many people who have had to replace the torsen LSD. If the inside rear wheel will stay on the ground with racing tires on grippy concrete, then I would say a torsen would be best, but for track racing where the turns tend to have a larger radius I would think a clutch type would be good.
One trick that could be used with a torsen is to run wider front tires and a larger front sway bar to offset the extra front traction due to the wider tires. This will keep the overall balance of the car similar but will help keep the inside rear wheel on the ground.
 

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z06, if thats the case then the S2000 torsen must be a lot different than the Miata Torsen. The miata unit is very solid and nearly bomb proof. Im one of few that has blown one up in the miata and it happened at 400hp on a drag launch because I had wheel hop. Hopped once, came down and boom. Im not a big drag racer....but I did mess around with it a little and the torsen held up fine until the hopping incident.

I run KAAZ clutch type limited slips in 3 of my cars now which is a VERY strong LSD...if broken in properly and if you use KAAZ fluids you wont get the stuttering around corners you see with some LSD's..that locked diff feeling.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Clutch type LSDs can be set up to act differently, depending on the intended use. For instance, a road racer would want a different setup compared to a drag racer. I've heard them called 1.5 way, 2 way , etc, referring to how aggressive the clutches are at different power levels.
 

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Yes, this is true with regards to when the LSD is active. When the accelerator is stepped on, the L.S.D. comes into use. But if you are braking through a turn 1-Way L.S.D. means that only when the accelerator is stepped on, the L.S.D. comes into use. The 1.5-Way L.S.D. means that when the car is braking, there is little L.S.D. effect and the 2-Way L.S.D. means that either when the car is accelerating or braking the L.S.D. is always active.
The difference between these are the shaping of the cam into different shapes for the pinion to fit.

Primarily what I meant with regards to the breaking in and "feel" is that with the KAAZ particularly if you dont do the rather tedious figure eight break in routines...and if you dont use KAAZ fluids the LSD is jerky and loud no matter its configuration.
 

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I'll vote for a nice progressive non-wearing-out viscous LSD. But the real issue is that putting an LSD of any type in is going to change the handling of the car, so Lotus would probably want to have different anti-roll bar sizes (at least, maybe even different tires, springs, dampers, etc.) to compensate. So making it a simple option that doesn't change anything else might not be practical...
 

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That would be nice if they used a clutch one that didn't give that locked diff feeling when making tight turns. I think the reason the S2000 torsens fail often is due to the high incidence of rear wheel lift on that car due to the large rear bar. My car is completely stock and I lift the rear inside wheel any time I am turning and going over a fair amount of crest (such as pulling out of some parking lots). When that spinning wheel catches it puts a very large instantaneous load on the torsen (similar to your wheel hop experience). Rumor from honda is that they beefed up the diff for the 2004 S2000. Maybe the miata torsen is a stronger unit too, sounds like it could be form your experience.
I'll just be happy if this car has some type of LSD.
 

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I just wanted to say that you guys have posted some great info about LSD's. I knew there were different types, but no one ever really explained them to me, so thanks. Always happy to learn something new :)
 
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