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boxerman
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Discussion Starter #1
For trackday I went from the stock tires to 048s a huge improvement along with alignment. The left rear o48 is down to the wear bar. So I either replace the two rears. But the 048s are a year old and maybe it is my mind but the grip does not feel the same and they only lasted about 5 days.

I have a second set of LSS wheels and the car is trailered so no need for street tires. The recomendation of some is to go to Hoosier as a whole set is $1000. What is the difference between a s6 and a r6. Can the front handle the 205's? I see there is also a Yokoham slick avaialable and also now avons?

What would be best as a next step up from the 048s. Some ay hoosier, other yoko as they are a true slick and the narrower front feels better. The car has the LSS suspension, baffled pan toe links etc. BTW after trying ebc yellows wich wereneither fish nor fowl, went to pagid blacks for pads and never looked back.
 

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I'm new to the lotus thing but not to the track. I assume you mean the difference between A6 and R6 hoosiers. The A6 was designed as an auto-x compound as it gets up to it's max grip at a lower temperature than the R6. The R6 on a heavier car lasts a bit longer and won't tend to overheat during a session. I know some though who track the A6, presumably for the immediate grip at the beginning of a race or qualifying session where the extra grip helps. I have also read on this forum that because the Lotus is so light, it can use the A6 as there is less heat build up. I know that many are running 205 front, 240 rear hoosiers so I know it can be done.

Slicks take a little longer to heat up, have more ultimate grip, and tend not to last as long (as many heat cycles) as Hoosiers before the grip goes away but the difference there may be moot. Some guys run these tires until they cord. You give up some grip (and likely a second or two a lap) but can still have fun on them. Plus, when you go to a new set, you fall in love all over again because the car has so much more grip.

I am planning on trying the Yoko slicks because the cup cars were designed with that in mind and I need more grip to make up for the loss of hp from my last car.
 

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Okay, so if you look at the Hoosier literature, the A6 has an optimum operating temperature of 110-140 degrees and the R6 has an optimum tire temp of 180-200.

According to the tirerack website,the A6 is

"...developed for drivers who compete in autocross, time trial and hillclimb events in dry conditions where responsiveness and high levels of grip at lower operating temperatures are desirable. Radial A6 tires are also used for road racing on lightweight cars or when competing in cool ambient temperatures where Hoosier Sports Car D.O.T. – Radial R6 tires cannot be brought up to operating temperatures."

So, the question is who has pyrometry data? What is the range of temps you measured if you checked it? This ought to give us a hint. I wonder if you could look at the A6 as the "soft compound" counterpart to the R6, just like there is a soft and hard compound for the Yoko slick? Anyone?
 

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boxerman
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Discussion Starter #4
If there was a choice between the r6 and uokos which would be better. Yokos seem narrower in front whch should give better feel, and yet they have more grip.

But going from 048's are yokos the next step or are R6's already a leap.
 

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Perhaps others can chime in as I haven't used Yoko slicks before. I understand they are grippier than the Hoosiers but there is no question Hoosiers are a large step up from the A048. I ran GT3s with various R compound track tires included Michelin Pilot Sport Cup, Toyo R888, and NT-01 and while each was fairly similar to the other, the difference between them and Hoosiers was HUGE. Lots more grip.

If you just want to take it step by step, you won't be disappointed by the Hoosiers. I have a friend who is planning on a head to head R6/Yoko hard comparison which should be revealing. That being said, slicks are likely still the ultimate.
 

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A true slick would overwhelm the LSS suspension, so keep that in mind as you add grip.
 
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