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Manual says 77lbs of torque. Is this what everyone is using??

I only ask as I just purchased my 05 and had Criswell do the state inspection and when they put the wheels back on they had to use an airwrench because they all have close to 145lbs of torque on each one. I am trying to pop these off and afraid I might snap something. This is nutz!!

Even the wheel lock has 120lbs. I have to say this bothers me considering this was my first experience with Criswell.
 

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One reason I tend to not let anyone else change wheels on my cars...or not without me seeing how they are doing it. On the Elise, hand torque.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
One reason I tend to not let anyone else change wheels on my cars...or not without me seeing how they are doing it. On the Elise, hand torque.

Normally like now I take the tires to get mounted balanced like I do for all of my cars. I would think the Lotus dealership should follow the OEM specs. I guess not!!
 

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145 lbs? Geez. I just changed my brakes and torqued the lugs at close to 80 lbs (I have an antique torque wrench that makes me guess between 75 and 80, so I went a bit high), but how do you get 145 out of it? Does anyone else use Anti-seize stuff on the bolts so they don't just rust (oxidize) on?

Steve
 

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90# if you are going on the track
 

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Whatever you do, follow the manufacturers lug torque guidelines. When I purchased my 05 as the second owner, and went to change wheels, I simply could not remove 2 of the 4 lugs on the right rear. I destroyed 2 lug keys with the strongest impact driver known to human kind.

The only way to get the rear wheel off was to drill out 2 of the 4 lugs until they cracked enough to move. Some "gorilla" had torqued them to 150 ft/lbs. plus, and they were absolutely frozen in place.
 

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145 lbs? Geez. I just changed my brakes and torqued the lugs at close to 80 lbs (I have an antique torque wrench that makes me guess between 75 and 80, so I went a bit high)

I think i have that same antique you do. I have had my friend use a 100 lb torque stick and it doesn't seem to be too bad.
 

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those torques don't do the wheels any good, either.
i use antisieze on ANY threaded fastener.
get a good torque wrench and use it yourself.
keep the gorillas away.
sam
 

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I always retorqued mine after getting new tires. I've had a couple that had to be in excess of 200 lb-ft as I had to use all my weight to get them to budge. Still, I'd expect more from the dealer.
 

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145 lbs? Geez...................Does anyone else use Anti-seize stuff on the bolts so they don't just rust (oxidize) on?

Steve
Whenever you find lug nuts or bolts tightened way past specification, carefully inspect the treads on them as well as the studs or holes in the hub. The wheel lugs on our cars only need to be tightened to 77 lbs/ft per the specs. Adding more torque only serves to weaken and distort the threads on the lugs and in the hubs which can ultimately lead to fastener failure. Torque specifications on bolts and nuts are used to get the proper amount of stretch in the fastener that does not permanently alter the strength of the fastener or its threads, yet locks the threads in place. Adding more torque actually weakens the fastener and or damages the threads and must be avoided. I personally would replace any lug bolt tightened in excess of its rating. The hubs should also be checked for distorted/damaged threads and distortion of the hub face as well. You can even warp the hub and brake rotor with uneven or excessive torque between the lugs which will lead to all sorts of wheel wobble problems. Lastly, the alloy wheels should be inspected for cracks radiating from the lug holes or distortion of the cone shaped lug bolt seats. Alloy wheels are soft and their hub faces can easily be distorted by excessive lug torque.

I would never use any type of anti-seize or other lubricant on the lug threads. The torque settings for fasteners are given for dry, clean threads only unless otherwise stated. Adding anti-seize or a lubricant to fastener threads before assembly will result in multiplied thread loading at the same torque as a dry fastener. The worst thing is that it is nearly impossible to get a consistent torque reading from lubricated threads. Most fasteners with oiled threads are not tightened to a torque setting, but rather to a degree angle after the fastener head or nut makes contact with the seat. You will find this type of assembly on engine rod bolts, bearing caps and head bolts. These fasteners are designed to have distorted threads when torqued and are never to be reused again. Wheels lugs are obviously meant to be used again, so do not lubricate them in any way. If you are having corrosion problems with your lugs, just loosen and retorque them one at a time at least a couple of times a year. This is also a good way to tell if you have damaged lug or hub threads. You should find, when backing off your lugs, that they are still at the same torque you set them at originally. If you constantly find them loose, this is a good indication they, the wheels, or the hub threads have been damaged and parts need to be replaced.

Lastly, never use any kind of impact wrench to install lug bolts. It may be faster, but you are almost certain to get an excessive and uneven torque between your lugs as well as there is a good chance of cross threading them. Only hand tighten your lugs and use proper torque settings.
 

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I would never use any type of anti-seize or other lubricant on the lug threads. The torque settings for fasteners are given for dry, clean threads only unless otherwise stated.
+1
 

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You guys beat me to it...

Sooo....

+2

:D

If I remember correctly, a wet torque is approximately 2x what the dry torque would be. So therefore if your wrench reads 77 ft lbs and you have anti-seize on the threads you are really putting 154 ft lbs of torque on those bolts. :crazyeyes
 

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Just jacked mine up for the first time in prep to clean and re-hook up the Hurricane inductor. My lug bolts were very tight and the breaker bar was only about a foot long. Had to find some thin pipe to put over the bar to get some more leverage. Finally got them off. Wheel arch comes off tomorrow. These cars are actually fun to work on.

Sent from my Elephone P7000 using Tapatalk
 
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