The Lotus Cars Community banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
285 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Thought I would share. A man came up with a math formula to calculate the bendiness of a road and we ask know how well it's cars do on bendy roads. :) could be a great resource to plan your next road trip no matter where u are.

"Maps are beautiful. You could scour the internet for hours finding weird and wonderful maps that chart everything from where ancient cities used to lie, to where modern countries would sit in Pangea. Well now we can add a new map to that list, and it’s one that might prove useful next time you’re planning a road trip.

A clever chap by the name of Rory McCann used OpenStreetMap data, and applied a formula to calculate the bendiness of each road. He divided the length of the road by the distance in a straight line between the two end points, which indicated how curvy the tarmac is. McCann split the world into a bunch of small boxes, with the box colour indicated by the average bendiness of the roads inside it.

The map shows that much of Canada and America’s Mid-west have very straight roads, probably due to the fact the extensively flat terrain doesn’t require curves. Aside from Germany and the Netherlands, Europe has a high density of twisty roads, which is probably due to the fact that roads were built up from older networks of travel built before cars were around." - from Car Throttle

How straight or bendy are the roads?
 

·
shay2nak
Joined
·
24,979 Posts
Well I guess that explains why muscle cars can't turn or why american cars have sh*tty handling. rotfl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
rotflrotflrotfl Well that covers lateral bendiness, now how about vertical bendiness? Low frequency would indicate hills and valleys and high frequency would be potholes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
This title is such a tease..

I'm still waiting for my google maps overlay that highlights the curvy roads and avoids everything else when navigating
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,063 Posts
rotflrotflrotfl Well that covers lateral bendiness, now how about vertical bendiness? Low frequency would indicate hills and valleys and high frequency would be potholes.
I doubt there'd be much of a difference. Roads are usually twisty because they are trying to get around natural obstacles. You can even tell from the map that flat areas have straight roads while hilly/mountainous areas have curvy roads
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
125 Posts
As tempting as bendy roads are, the salvage yard is filled with cars that encountered something unexpected in a turn and lost the car. Driving cars near the limit on public roads endangers you and others. The reason to own a Lotus is to get that aspect of driving done on a track where everyone is going in the same direction and knows the rules. Other drivers on the track are not texting or otherwise distracted. I will do my peformance driving on the track and use public roads for transportation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,063 Posts
As tempting as bendy roads are, the salvage yard is filled with cars that encountered something unexpected in a turn and lost the car. Driving cars near the limit on public roads endangers you and others. The reason to own a Lotus is to get that aspect of driving done on a track where everyone is going in the same direction and knows the rules. Other drivers on the track are not texting or otherwise distracted. I will do my peformance driving on the track and use public roads for transportation.
There's a major difference between enjoying a bendy road and pushing a car to its limits. There is another fairly recent thread that debates this more
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
125 Posts
I completely agree with you cyow5. Unfortunately, some people don't know the diffrence. When I was younger, I didn't. Hit a tree when I spun out of a decreasing radius turn in a BMW 1600. Fortunately, it was only sheet metal damage. In my Elise, it would have been a total loss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
I have noticed here in western PA we have lots of very twisty roads! We have our favorite off the beaten path driving raods that we do Lotus drives on.

One thing I do notice though is google (maybe just maps in general) for some reason tend to straighten the roads a bit when there a lots of small back to back turns. Some of our best driving roads you wouldn't think were that great on a map. All of our roads were pretty much just wagon trails through the woods at some point.
 

·
Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
Joined
·
5,697 Posts
Many of our most 'fun' roads here in rural NW New Jersey (<--- don't laugh) were old Indian trails. They followed riverbeds, avoided rocky outcroppings and steep inclines. (Tiring when carrying a canoe, right?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
There are no twisty roads near the North Oregon Coast. The coastal range is completely flat, especially around Mist, Vernonia, Timber, Clatskanie, etc. Apaiary road should be in Kansas, or central Ohio. The Bible Creek Hillclimb is really on a drag strip.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top