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How many miles can you get out of the non LSS tires vs the LSS tires?
 

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nxm150 said:
How many miles can you get out of the non LSS tires vs the LSS tires?
It will depend almost entirely on how you drive the car, if experience on the S1 is any indication.

eg.
Toyos on S1 used mostly for motorway (freeway): 30,000 miles on the fronts, about 15000 on the rears before down to legal minimum.

Toyos on S1 used mostly for trackdays: 10000 miles on the front, 3000 on the rear before down to legal minimum

Advans used mostly on country twisting roads: 15000 on fronts, 8000 on rears before down to legal minimum

Expect much the same level of difference from the new yokos... it's all down to how the car is driven. I'm assuming the LSS cars are going to live a harder life (otherwise why get the LSS, right?).

Craigy
 

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I have a different question regarding tires, which, according to my Costco magazine, may impact tire life. While reading Costco's latest mailing this weekend, I was interested to see that their tire centers inflate with compressed nitrogen instead of air for better handling, mileage, and wear. This is the first I've seen of this (which means nothing), but is anyone aware of real benefits to this. If so, I'll just have Costco keep the tires inflated.
 

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The benefit of using nitrogen is that it ensures that there is no moisture in the tire. (To really be sure you would have to purge the tire somehow to get out all of the air that's already in there). If you had a source of dry air, it would be just as good as nitrogen.

Moisture in a tire causes greater pressure changes as the tire heats up. Some of the water goes from liquid to gas, which is a much bigger volume change than going from gas to warmer gas.

I suppose that this could help the evenness of the tire wear, if moisture in the air caused the pressure to go up excessively and bulge out the center of the tread.

Higher pressure actually gives you better mileage, and usually better handling (compared to the manufacturer's specs) so I think that their claim is opposite the truth in those aspects.
 

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dez said:
I have a different question regarding tires, which, according to my Costco magazine, may impact tire life. While reading Costco's latest mailing this weekend, I was interested to see that their tire centers inflate with compressed nitrogen instead of air for better handling, mileage, and wear. This is the first I've seen of this (which means nothing), but is anyone aware of real benefits to this. If so, I'll just have Costco keep the tires inflated.
Using high-purity nitrogen can lead to less damage to the tire due to oxidation, at least from the outside (obviously, the exterior surface of the tire will still be exposed to ~20% O2 from air). Also, N2 reportedly diffuses out of the tire at lower rate.

Neither of these strike me as great reasons to fill with N2 - especially where we are likely to check/change pressures often, and the tire compound on our soft tires wears off long before the compound is degraded by oxidation .

Does anyone remember the relative molar heat capacites for pure oxygen and nitrogen gases? I wonder if N2 might be more resistant to pressure changes given increases in temperature. That would be a cool benefit.
 

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No, I didn't measure my tires (Advan 07s). However, they've had three autoXs, and 6,000 street miles and there's a lot of life left in them. If I had to guess, I'd say fronts 18,000, rears 12,000.

Almost 8 months' worth! :D
 

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I have 3000 on my 048's and by the looks of them, I would venture to guess that I'll be replacing them at 5000. (rarely driven in a straight line and rarely driven slow).
 

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If somebody has a new (unused) set of 048's, could you please measure the tread depth from the wear indicator? Mine don't seem too far from the wear indicators, but I'm much more conscious of the tread depth now than I was when they were fresh. So,at this point, It's a little tough to speculate on expected mileage from my first set, without having a new set to gauge by. Thanks. Ron
 

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khamai said:
048's start with 6/32nds.

At 3000 miles, I have 2/32 in the rear and 3/32 in the front. If they start at
6/32, the rears will be AT the wear indicators at 5000 miles.
 

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pianomaniac said:
At 3000 miles, I have 2/32 in the rear and 3/32 in the front. If they start at
6/32, the rears will be AT the wear indicators at 5000 miles.
Correction.......The actual total mileage is 2442 miles. The rears are 2/32 at the wear indicators and -4/32 at the tread.

When you say that the 048's are 6/32, is that at the wear indicators or at the tread? I would guess the tread. At least I hope! At the tread would give me approx 7000 miles from the rears while at the indicators would give me a little less than 4000 miles.
 

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Remember that tread wear dramatically slows as you approach the wear bars due to reduced heat factors from tread squirm.
 

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Stan said:
Remember that tread wear dramatically slows as you approach the wear bars due to reduced heat factors from tread squirm.
Sounds like grip is reduced as you approach the wear bars also?
 

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>>Sounds like grip is reduced as you approach the wear bars also?<<

Not really. The wear is not a pure miles per inch thing. The harder rubber is under the tread rubber. We are ignoring heat cycle factors here.

The rears wear the fastest, and lesser toe-in can reduce that effect.
 

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Stan said:
>>Sounds like grip is reduced as you approach the wear bars also?<<

Not really. The wear is not a pure miles per inch thing. The harder rubber is under the tread rubber. We are ignoring heat cycle factors here.

The rears where the fastest, and lesser toe-in can reduce that effect.
Stan.....can I borrow your brain for just one day? Thanks.
 

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Keep in mind that tread does not increase grip. So the lack of tread does not mean you will have less grip.

You will lose water shedding though...so grip in the wet will be reduced. As might grip on any sandy surface.

The grippiest tires have no tread. :)
 

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Randy Chase said:
Keep in mind that tread does not increase grip. So the lack of tread does not mean you will have less grip.

You will lose water shedding though...so grip in the wet will be reduced. As might grip on any sandy surface.

The grippiest tires have no tread. :)
So then, there is no loss of grip in running the 048's past the wear indicators in the dry?
 

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Stan said:
>>Sounds like grip is reduced as you approach the wear bars also?<<

Not really. The wear is not a pure miles per inch thing. The harder rubber is under the tread rubber. We are ignoring heat cycle factors here.

The rears wear the fastest, and lesser toe-in can reduce that effect.
Toe-in would appear to scrub the outside edges of the tires?
Please excuse my ignorance, but I ask that we start a alignment 101 course thread. I assume that the tires should cause the least resistence(assuming a straight line)in a neutral toe/camber position. Why then do F1 run with what appears to be extreme negative camber in the rear?
 
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