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Nein Kinder
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Discussion Starter #1
Just when I thought I had it figured out, I ran into a new way to mess up while jacking my Elise.

I removed the brake calipers to paint them, and with that tasked finished, it was time to reinstall the calipers and bleed the clutch and brakes. Since I had to flip the front calipers to bleed them, I decided the easiest way to accomplish everything would be to support the car on 4 jack stands during the work. With the car up on 4 quality stands (like the ones sold by S111), I checked the car to make sure it was solid by rocking it (no movement), then slid underneath on a creeper to bleed the clutch.

As I was moving around on the creeper between the two jack stands under the rear subframe, I noticed one of the jack stands MOVED! I made sure it was still under the subframe, then quickly got out from under the car. What the heck was going on?

With a little investigation, I determined that the car was only supported by three jack stands ... two under the forward jacking points and one under the right corner of the subframe. My garage floor has a very slight slope to divert water to the floor drain. At the back of the car, all the weight was being supported by the right jack stand, even though both jack stands were touching the subframe. The left jack stand was 3/16" lower than the other side due to the sloping floor. The solution was to add a plywood shim under the low jack stand so that it shared some of the weight.

To put it another way, the chassis only drooped 3/16" of an inch right-to-left when supported by one jack stand on the right - that's a pretty stiff chassis!

Perhaps this caution will help someone else avoid a similar hazard. Pretty amazing...

Glen
 

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Just when I thought I had it figured out, I ran into a new way to mess up while jacking my Elise.

I removed the brake calipers to paint them, and with that tasked finished, it was time to reinstall the calipers and bleed the clutch and brakes. Since I had to flip the front calipers to bleed them, I decided the easiest way to accomplish everything would be to support the car on 4 jack stands during the work. With the car up on 4 quality stands (like the ones sold by S111), I checked the car to make sure it was solid by rocking it (no movement), then slid underneath on a creeper to bleed the clutch.

As I was moving around on the creeper between the two jack stands under the rear subframe, I noticed one of the jack stands MOVED! I made sure it was still under the subframe, then quickly got out from under the car. What the heck was going on?

With a little investigation, I determined that the car was only supported by three jack stands ... two under the forward jacking points and one under the right corner of the subframe. My garage floor has a very slight slope to divert water to the floor drain. At the back of the car, all the weight was being supported by the right jack stand, even though both jack stands were touching the subframe. The left jack stand was 3/16" lower than the other side due to the sloping floor. The solution was to add a plywood shim under the low jack stand so that it shared some of the weight.

To put it another way, the chassis only drooped 3/16" of an inch right-to-left when supported by one jack stand on the right - that's a pretty stiff chassis!

Perhaps this caution will help someone else avoid a similar hazard. Pretty amazing...

Glen
Hockey pucks, get 4 hockey pucks to put on the top od your jack stands, they will compress enough to take up the diff in your floor.
 

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Its because Elise chassis is so stiff it can rest on three points.
Ordinary steel unibody cars are much more flexible and will sag onto four points.

Stilll safer to support on 4 tho.
 
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