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Discussion Starter #221

Watch a Mustang Shelby GT500 Battle a Porsche 911 GT3 on Track

This is a helluva lot closer than we expected.


The Ford Mustang Shelby GT500, with 760 horsepower sent to the rear wheels, seems like a recipe for tire-burning perfection, but it's capable of so much more. As Road & Track editor-at-large Jason Cammisa explains in his latest video for ISSIMI Official, the high-powered Mustang is a truly serious sports car.

So serious, in fact, that Cammisa put it up against the Ferrari 812 Superfast and Porsche 911 GT3 RS. We're not going to lead you on: the Ferrari roasts the GT500 in a drag race, no contest. But the GT3 RS doesn't dispatch the Shelby quite so easily. With Randy Pobst behind the wheel of both, the Porsche is just two-tenths of a second faster around Chuckwalla Valley Raceway.

Stacked up to either car, it loses. But the point is that, even when staring down six-figure competitors from Italy and Germany, the brash, all-American GT500 doesn't fall apart. It's composed, capable, and fun on the race track. It's got the precision of the GT350R with the power of a Hellcat.

Really, it's a special car. And despite the weight of its iconic name, the GT500 manages to live up to and arguably surpass its predecessors. It's faster, more powerful, more refined, and more capable than any Shelby that has come before it. More than that, as a package, it's a much more complete machine than old Shelbys—even in their heyday—were.

As per usual, Cammisa's a fun and knowledgeable host that also knows how to hoon these cars properly. We definitely recommend watching the video, even if we've spoiled the races in it.


 

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Discussion Starter #222
John Prine "Other Side of Town"

 

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Discussion Starter #223
Modern Tire Tech Means You Can Still Have Fun With Your Sports Car in Winter

These days, even the biggest, widest sizes can handle snow on the ground.


Up until recently, ultra-wide tires meant driving your sports car through actual snow was challenging, even with dedicated tires. That's no longer the case. Modern winter tires are advanced enough that now, the only thing holding you back from ripping your Hellcat up a snow-covered mountain is the lack of ground clearance.

Jonathan Benson of the Tyre Reviews YouTube channel wanted to see just how far he could push a set of modern winters. So he borrowed a new Porsche 911 from Michelin, equipped with a set of new Pilot Alpin 5s.





Pilot Alpin 5




Pilot Alpin 5
Michelintirerack.com
$197.39
BUY NOW
The Pilot Alpin 5 is Michelin's newest performance winter tire, meant to bridge the gap between on-road performance and grip in snow. Benson decided to test the tire's full range of abilities, taking it on a 1000-mile journey that included a track test and a climb up a snowy Swiss mountainside. Despite the tire's many sipes and winter rubber compound, it does well on the circuit and on the road. And when it came to traversing the snow-covered pass, they didn't skip a beat.

So if you think big wide tire sizes are stopping you from driving your fun car this winter, try out a set of modern winters. You might be pleasantly surprised at what they can handle.
 

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Discussion Starter #224
Bosch’s Eye-Tracking Sun Visor Aims to Stop Squinting While Driving

The clear Virtual Visor tracks the driver's face and the sun to cast a shadow over the driver’s eyes.

1257540



  • Bosch has introduced a Virtual Visor, a high-tech version of the traditional visor.
  • The visor has a clear LCD panel that selectively darkens to keep the driver's vision free of the sun's glare.
  • Although the product is still in development, Bosch is talking with automakers and plans to bring the product to market in the next few years.
We've all been there: driving with sun glaring in our eyes. First we attempt to block the sun with our hand, then we reluctantly resort to the sun visor, accepting that reduced visibility is better than no visibility.

Luckily for us, the same problem plagued an engineer at Bosch, Ryan Todd, during his daily commute, so he set out to find a solution. The result was the Virtual Visor, a sun visor that doesn't compromise visibility.

The Virtual Visor is a transparent LCD screen, which, paired with an in-cabin RGB camera and artificial intelligence, tracks the sun and the driver's face. Using a patented algorithm, the system detects the driver’s view, and when it senses that the sun is reaching it, the LCD darkens the area of the visor, casting a shadow over the driver's eyes. Even at its strongest, the visor remains about 90 percent transparent, giving it another advantage over traditional visors.

image

Bosch
The Virtual Visor made its debut this week at CES, winning the technology show's Best of Innovation award. The high-tech visor system is still being refined and isn't ready for mass production yet, but Bosch says it is in talks with automakers to get the product to consumers in a few years. By the time the product does reach the market, Bosch says, it anticipates driver-facing cameras to be commonplace in vehicles, and these could be integrated with the Virtual Visor to reduce production costs.
 

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Discussion Starter #225
Formula One Link-Up Boosts All-Female W Series
By Reuters


LONDON — W Series organisers say they have moved a step closer to getting a woman driver into Formula One after announcing on Thursday a deal to be on the support programme for this year's U.S. and Mexican Grands Prix.
Conceived as a platform to help women gain experience to compete with men further up the motorsport ladder, the all-female series started last year with six races in Europe alongside the DTM German Touring Car championship.

"In just one year, W Series has contributed significantly to increasing interest in the topic of diversity and inclusion in motorsport," Ross Brawn, Formula One's managing director for motorsport, said in a statement.

"We are convinced that our sport must offer equal opportunities for men and women to compete together," added the Briton.

"It is no coincidence that improving the diversity of the F1 grid by supporting and promoting driver talent from under-represented backgrounds is one of our strategic objectives."

Formula One has not had a female racer line up on the starting grid since 1976 but W Series chief executive Catherine Bond Muir told reporters the new deal was of crucial importance.

"Progressing within motorsport requires people to have access to a lot of money," she said. "You need the support and the sponsorship as well as the talent.

"I think what this will give our drivers is a much bigger and better platform in which to promote themselves... so they will be able to attract more sponsorship.

"I think we are already starting to achieve our ambitions. We are closer to getting women into Formula One."

Bond Muir said there could be further expansion into Asia next year, with Formula One's season-opener in Australia still a possibility.

"We've always said we have very bold and ambitious plans to expand across the world. In our first year we purposely stayed in Europe because we didn't want to expand too quickly," she explained.

"I think these two races represent a sensible expansion in 2020 and hopefully we will expand across the other side of the world towards Asia in 2021."

Bond Muir said she wanted, however, to avoid big gaps between races on the calendar.

This year's series champion will earn $500,000 but also acquire 15 points towards the 40 needed for a Formula One superlicence over a three-year period.

The new races at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas, and Mexico City's Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez will be on successive Saturdays when Formula One qualifying is the main draw.

The Formula One title has been decided at one or other of the circuits in four of the last five years and both have space on support programmes without the usual junior series.

The 2019 W Series title was won by Britain's Jamie Chadwick who is also a development driver for the Williams F1 team.

Former F1 racer David Coulthard, who competed in 246 grands prix between 1994 and 2008, is chairman of the W Series advisory board.
 

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Discussion Starter #226
Top Gear America Returns This Spring With Three New Hosts

Dax Shepard, Rob Corddry, and Jethro Bovingdon are your on-camera entertainment.

Top Gear is a worldwide phenomenon. The original show is legendary, delivering motoring fun in its current form to the masses since 2002. The show’s popularity has spawned country-specific spinoffs such as Top Gear France, Top Gear Russia, and Top Gear Korea, to name a few. The U.S. has had not one, but two iterations of the popular show, and we’re about to get a third. MotorTrend Group and BBC Studios are partnering to revive the show with three new hosts that will air exclusively on the MotorTrend App, the company’s streaming service.

While the show's car content matters, TGA will only be as good as the chemistry between the three hosts – Dax Shepard, Rob Corddry, and Jethro Bovingdon. Oh, and The Stig. Shepard is best known as Kristen Bell’s husband, though he has a stack of acting credits – CHiPs, Hit and Run, Netflix’s The Ranch, and more. Corddry, who has four Emmys and a Peabody, found fame on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart while starring in shows such as Arrested Development, Community, and Curb Your Enthusiasm.
 

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Discussion Starter #227
USS Doris Miller: Navy to name Aircraft Carrier for African American Hero.



There is an old (at least partially true) adage in national security circles:

When an international crisis occurs, the President asks: Where’s the carrier?
For over 70 years, aircraft carriers have been one of the most important military tools associated with diplomacy in times of peace, crisis, and war. A visible statement of US national interest, aircraft carriers are a powerful symbol of national power. That “symbolism” began with names like Lexington, Saratoga and Yorktown. For the past 50 years, with the exception of USS Enterprise, the U.S. Navy’s nuclear-powered aircraft carriers (CVNs: CV for carrier of aviation and N for nuclear) have all been named for powerful politicians, mainly Presidents.

Today, on Martin Luther King, Jr, Day, the U.S. Navy will radically break from this tradition in a ceremony in Pearl Harbor with naming the next CVN after Pearl Harbor Hero Doris “Dorie” Miller.


Miller was below decks December 7, 1941, when the first Japanese torpedo struck USS West Virginia (BB 48). His battle station in the magazine damaged, Miller was ordered to the bridge, where he helped carry the ship’s mortally wounded captain to safety. Miller then loaded and fired an anti-aircraft machine gun—a weapon that, as an African American in a segregated military, he had not been trained to operate. Miller stayed behind once the order to abandon ship was passed to help evacuate shipmates and save the lives of Sailors in the burning water.

For his extraordinary courage, Miller was the first African American to be awarded the Navy Cross. Newspapers around the country cited his example as an argument for civil rights and equality.

“This marks the first time in this conflict that such high tribute has been made in the Pacific Fleet to a member of his race, and I’m sure that the future will see others similarly honored for brave acts.” — Admiral Chester Nimitz
That note, of course, glosses over so much. How hard it was for a “Negro” in America of 1941 in nation … in the military. How racism delayed giving Miller any honor, let alone a significant one. And …

The Navy Cross citation

"For distinguished devotion to duty, extraordinary courage and disregard for his own personal safety during the attack on the Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, by Japanese forces on December 7, 1941. While at the side of his Captain on the bridge, Miller, despite enemy strafing and bombing and in the face of a serious fire, assisted in moving his Captain, who had been mortally wounded, to a place of greater safety, and later manned and operated a machine gun directed at enemy Japanese attacking aircraft until ordered to leave the bridge."
Miller’s actions made it to the big screen (at least once):








Adm. Chester Nimitz awards the Navy Cross medal to Mess Attendant 2nd Class Doris Miller for his actions aboard the battleship USS West Virginia (BB-48) during the Dec. 7, 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The award was presented to Miller aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) during a ceremony in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (U.S. Navy photo, 27 May 1942/Released)
 

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Discussion Starter #228
The guys at Donut Media are much funnier than I expected. More informative too.

This story is quite detailed and therefore damn long. But, I am retired and can listen to podcasts while I read.

 

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Discussion Starter #229
Wait a second!!! Old Toyotas are spreading a virus??????????
 

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Re: Enzo Ferrari - they didn't call him 'Il Commandatore' because he was a nice guy. Not only does it translate as something like 'Supreme Commander', but on top of that, if you know opera (and everybody in Italy knew opera in those decades), it's a specific reference to the ghost (and statue) of Don Giovanni's (Don Juan's) father who condemns him to the underworld for his sins. Sort of an operatic boogie man - big, scary, and no second chances.
 

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Discussion Starter #231
 

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Discussion Starter #232
Steely, thanks for that info.

Yeah, we knew he wasn't the nicest guy in the world. OTOH, when Surtees got really hurt Enzo was quite solicitous and paid all his hospital bills. The brilliant Surtees was one of Enzo's favorite drivers.

The LeMans team manager insulting move with Surtees cause him to quit the team. Apparently, manager didn't like him. (Idiotic)
 

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Discussion Starter #233
Kobe Bryant's Oscar Winning Short:

 

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Discussion Starter #234
Useless trivia:

1. What was the last name of the hero in "The Matrix"?

B. How do vets fix a turtle's shell when pieces are missing?

Answers later today.
 

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Discussion Starter #235
1. Prene

2. They use Bondo
 

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Discussion Starter #236
Allow me to highly recommend a documentary I saw, which I found astonishing.

"Heal", about atypical forms of healing even the worst diseases.

I saw it on Netflix, but there are other sources.


https://www.healdocumentary.com"]https://www.healdocumentary.com


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Please bear in mind that about 9 years ago, my shoulder gave me lots of pain. Even just sitting down. (Missing tendon)

Rebekka, a novice in a form of healing, was over for dinner and offered to try to help me.

I sat in a chair, with my mind in neutral (i.e. no expectations positive or negative).

She left, and as I was doing the dishes, I realized that my pain was gone. After the dishes were done, I went out to the garage, where I worked under the Elise until about 11:30 PM.

Less than 30 minutes of treatment. I'd had steroid shots, etc, but Rebekka got rid of all the pain.
 

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Discussion Starter #237
THE AIRBRUSHED RACING HISTORY OF “FORD V FERRARI”

The New Yorker

James Mangold’s new film, “Ford v Ferrari,” based on a true story, is about the restoration of a hidden hero—a race-car driver—to the prominence that history has denied him. It’s a superhero-movie version of a real-life drama—a sort of buddy movie that’s filled with high-speed, high-stakes, high-risk action. It develops its drama on an international scale and inscribes it on the world-striding map of industrial politics of a historic scope, while remaining family-friendly and sentimental about domestic life. It’s also sentimental about the time in which it’s set (1959-1967), and about the hard-nosed, old-school man’s world on which it’s centered—which is to say that it’s a prime-grade Oscar candidate, if the pundits are to be trusted. In the tailoring of its story for untroubled consumption, it stumbles as much with its omissions as with its excesses.


The movie starts in 1959, in Los Angeles, where a race-car driver, Carroll Shelby (Matt Damon), is forced to quit racing, for medical reasons. In the early sixties, he has started a new life, designing racing cars and selling souped-up stock cars. He works closely with a talented but irascible English driver named Ken Miles (Christian Bale), who drives Shelby’s cars in local races. Meanwhile, in Michigan, the Ford Motor Company, led by Henry Ford II (Tracy Letts), is lagging far behind other automakers in sales. Ford’s marketing director, Lee Iacocca (Jon Bernthal), has a plan: to make Ford cars appear hip and desirable, he recommends that the company create a car that will triumph at the twenty-four-hour Le Mans race, which Ferrari consistently wins.

Iacocca gets Ford’s approval and hires Shelby, a skeptical outsider who is given limitless resources to design and build such a car—in ninety days—in a frenzy of collective urgency akin to a virtual Manhattan Project of auto racing. Shelby takes for granted that Ken, a brilliant technician who collaborates with him in the design of the vehicle, will drive it at Le Mans. But an executive toady, Leo Beebe (Josh Lucas), fears that Ken is a loose cannon who will lead to a public-relations disaster, and he orders Shelby to replace him. It’s hardly a spoiler to say that, in the end, Shelby outmaneuvers the suits and Ken drives, and does so heroically, but not without a melancholic beat resulting from the culture clash.


Through another lens, the story of “Ford v Ferrari” can be viewed as that of an independent filmmaker brought in by a studio to work on a big-budget franchise film. Shelby, with his amiable, ****-kicking manner and his suave bravado, threads the corporate needle of assertiveness and compromise. After the race-car project suffers a humiliating public failure, he is summoned to the Ford offices, in Dearborn, Michigan, for a high-stakes meeting with Ford and other executives. What Shelby does during the meeting is, in effect, hold up a mirror to the making of studio movies—including “Ford v Ferrari.” He explains that bureaucratic structure is the obstacle to the victory that the executives seek: “You can’t win a race by committee,” he says, and asserts that what they’ve accomplished so far is actually a success, because Enzo Ferrari saw the quality of Shelby’s car and “He’s scared to death that you’re gonna start trusting me. You’re welcome.” Here is the automotive auteur in action.

Later, Shelby is again confronted by Beebe, whose mealy-mouthed bureaucratic jargon and weaselly chicanery inflects the entire drama. But Shelby outpaces him by taking Ford for a friendly ride in the race car that he’s been financing. Expecting an enjoyable jaunt, Ford instead gets the ride of his life: Shelby cuts loose on the test track, reaching the high speeds and precarious turns that simulate an actual race, scaring the boss out of his wits. From the sidelines, Shelby’s right-hand mechanic, Phil Remington (played, in a warm and wise supporting turn, by Ray McKinnon), tells an onlooker, “The uninitiated have a tendency to soil themselves.” When the car stops, Ford is blubbering uncontrollably and admits, “I had no idea.” As a result of this trick (and avoiding spoilers), Shelby is allowed to rehire Ken—or, rather, Francis Ford Coppola is allowed by the studio to hire Al Pacino rather than Ryan O’Neal or Robert Redford. What an actor goes through onscreen when the camera is rolling—the studio boss has no idea.

The life of the Miles family checks off the essential boxes for the sentimental connection of family and work that’s found in family movies: headstrong father, possessed of a pioneering obsession; a mother and wife (Molly, played by Caitriona Balfe) who is deeply devoted to him and shares his passion for fast cars (teasingly affirming that she loves their “vibration”) but has her feet on the ground, providing the tether, the reality principle, that constrains him; and a son who takes a deep interest in his father’s exploits. Indeed, Ken takes his son along to the track and lovingly passes along his practical and philosophical racing sense. Ken may be a loose cannon among drivers, but he’s as tightly settled at home as a valve cover in a gasket. Molly is the gasket; she’s rendered as a stereotype. She forced him to stop racing when he lost his garage to the I.R.S., and, when he sneaks around to join Shelby in the new venture, she confronts him about it—with yet another stereotype of badassery—by driving on streets at top speed to extract his confession.

Yet the big romance in the movie is bromance, and Mangold conjures it with a touch that’s reminiscent of the rowdy friendships found in films by Howard Hawks and John Ford. The emotional connection between Shelby and Ken is also a professional one, a seemingly telepathic bond that connects their instincts at the race track, akin to the on-set telepathy between Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio that’s seen in Jonas Mekas’s documentary about the making of “The Departed.” What’s more, the bromance of “Ford v Ferrari” has a physical side. To patch up a rough spot in their friendship, Shelby shows up at Ken’s home and finds him carrying bags of groceries. Ken punches him in the nose, and Shelby tackles him, and the two men fight—under the amused gaze of Molly and a small crowd of passersby—until, exhausted from their quasi-erotic tangle, they lie side by side on the ground, as if postcoitally. It’s the movie’s closest suggestion of physical love, and it also gives rise to its best moment of deftly dramatic comedy: while the two men wrestle amid the groceries scattered on the ground, Shelby grabs a can with which to hit Ken but quickly puts it down, instead grabbing a soft loaf of bread and hitting him with it innocuously.

If Ken’s domestic life is rendered in roses with a few thorns still attached, Shelby’s—and this is the key weakness of the film—isn’t rendered at all. He’s seen briefly, early on, living alone in a messy trailer, and then isn’t seen at home again, nor is he seen to have any family life or romantic relationships. The elision of Shelby’s private life is a sleight of hand that obscures, above all, the complexity of life—it suggests a sheer unwillingness to contend with facts that don’t easily fit into a sentimental schema. The real Shelby was married seven times, and two or three of those marriages overlapped with the eight-year span covered in “Ford v Ferrari,” and extramarital affairs appear to have been involved, too. To place details of Shelby’s complicated life in the movie would be to offer a hero whose characteristics stand in contrast to the sanitized image of Hollywood heroes (even flawed ones) in family-oriented movies.




The racing is also sanitized. There’s plenty of footage set on the Le Mans track and others throughout the film, but they’re all characterized by the tricks of the cinematographic and special-effects trades, combined with the simplistic display of basic emotions. The scenes of speed feature a rapid montage of a varied but narrow array of imagery, including brief views of the track from the front of the car, views of the roadbed from way down at the front bumper, side views of cars jockeying for position, overhead views of cars whizzing along the course, views of the driver seen upward from the floor of the car, and closeups of the driver set in grim determination (or, in Ken’s case, often talking himself sardonically into the fray).

The result is a jumble of spectacular details, thrown together to convey a whirl of high-speed activity that signifies racing and conveys speed and inscribes the drama into it, but without conveying the essential experience of a race. Where is the point of view of a driver, through the windshield, seeing the road ahead and the other drivers? Whatever it is that makes the uninitiated soil themselves and renders a grown man a blubbering mess, but which such people as Ken and Shelby can handle with cool and ardent engagement, goes utterly unexperienced by the movie’s viewers (and I sat in the second row in front of a very big screen). The overeager tangle of varied images turns the moment-by-moment excitement of a race into a mere special-effects dump—a scaled-up version of a car commercial.

Though “Ford v Ferrari” is rooted in history and based on the quasi-documentary details of auto racing (including a great moment in the film—when Phil uses Scotch tape and a ball of yarn to outdo the computer-based analyses of Ford’s technicians), its franchise-like tailoring of emotion and action turns the movie empty and hollow. Howard Hawks made one of the greatest of all auto-racing dramas—“Red Line 7000,” from 1965—at the same time that the key events of “Ford v Ferrari” took place. But Hawks’s film, far from being a celebration of the enabling compromises of working with the big auto studios, looks closely at the personal and competitive conflicts of drivers—and it blends thrilling views of auto races with detailed stories of the complicated intimate lives of the drivers, and, in the process, weaves cultural change (the widespread popularity of rock music, the age of sexual liberation) into the action. Mangold’s film, dealing with matters of life and death, of fortune and fame, of industrial survival and personal vision, infantilizes them. The corporate culture that it reflects and embodies is, above all, sanctimoniousness, nostalgic, and priggish.

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Discussion Starter #238
Adam Carolla and Nate Adams have produced another good film. Adam isn't responsible for that Chinese virus, right?

From Classiccars.com "Journal"
Racing to the movies – ‘Uppity: The Willy T. Ribbs Story’
A film about breaking down barriers and believing in yourself. 'Uppity' is a gritty, hard hitting look at Willy T. Ribbs -- The Jackie Robinson of motorsport

Lewis Hamilton is poised to become the winningest driver in Formula One history. Many think he may be the greatest of all time, and certainly for his era. The famed British racer is a black man, and while he overcame obstacles, he was not subject to the kinds of barriers faced by another black racer 35 years ago.


Willy T. Ribbs tests a Brabham Formula One car at Estoril, Portugal |

Willy T. Ribbs, an American, tested with Brabham – and was quick enough to be in the big show – but never got to turn a competitive wheel in the highest form of motorsport.

Ribbs’ life and racing career is the subject of new movie showing on Netflix.

Willy, his son Theo and I casually sat together at a picnic table during lunch three years ago at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway during the SVRA historic racing weekend. He was there as a former Indianapolis 500 participant driving in the Pro/Am race.

We had a warm, engaging and friendly chat as we reminisced about Trans-Am, IMSA and so many other races I had watched as he raced. While chatting, he told me that Adam Carolla, a common acquaintance of ours, was set to make a documentary about him. He got a big grin on his face as he said, “It’s called ‘Uppity’.” We both laughed — hard. Not because of the racist slur – but for what we both knew it meant.
https://journal.classiccars.com/202...t-wont-bear-what-you-think-your-car-is-worth/
We had met many years before, in the 1980s, at Road America when my dad was the track’s promoter with his business partner, Carl Haas. For all the things I had heard people whisper under their breath, I found Willy to be quite charming and very kind to a teen fan. I had always held him in very high esteem, as a person and as a race driver.

Certainly, Ribbs was an anomaly. A black man winning races in what was otherwise a white male dominated sport. I knew Lyn St. James back then as well. I had really looked up to both of them as they broke unwritten barriers that today’s females and people of color really don’t have to face in motorsport.

From the moment Willy told me about the documentary, I was eager to see it. Carolla and his group, including producer Nate Adams, have become phenomenal storytellers in several racing-centric films including Winning: The Racing Life of Paul Newman, The 24 Hour War, and Shelby American. Uppity is yet another great historical document from the talented folks at Corolla’s Chassy Media. Their fascination with the subjects they tackle make for viewing that sucks you into the story.

The grandson of a successful plumbing company owner in San Jose, California, Ribbs was fascinated with cars and racing his whole life. His father was a hobbyist sports car racer in the 1960s. From the time he was a kid, Willy had dreams of winning the Formula One World Championship and/or the Indianapolis 500. Much of his grit and wisdom seemed to be channeled from his grandfather, who hated racing and expected his grandson to take over the family business.
https://journal.classiccars.com/202...es-but-now-its-up-to-us-to-finish-it-for-him/
Instead of going to college, Willy took his educational savings and, like so many aspiring drivers, went to England to race in the British Formula Ford series. He put down a winning record, but ran out of money before he could make the step into Formula 3. The UK, even in the 1970s, did not have the same attitudes about color as the young, talented driver would experience upon returning to the United States.


Ribbs won many races for Jack Rousch

Needless to say, in NASCAR, Formula Atlantic, Trans-Am and IMSA, Ribbs was fortunate enough to race for the likes of Jim Trueman, Jack Roush, and Dan Gurney, to name a few — all who respected his talent. But as racial barriers seemed to be crossed – along with numerous podium-paying finish lines – Ribbs still was judged on the color of his skin.

All said, Willy T. Ribbs was an amazing shoe. One wonders what could have been had his immense skill as a wheelman been met by a color-blind sport.

Ribbs with Champion Boxer Muhammed Ali | Chassy Media
The movie itself is really well edited and has so much period footage. It took me back to those days of my youth, leaning on the chain link fences at turns five and three at Road America — and at the Milwaukee Mile when Willy had his IndyCar rides. The commentary was spot-on from many insiders.
https://journal.classiccars.com/2020/01/11/youll-be-driving-for-at-least-another-decade/
The only caveat I personally had with the film was having to sit through the pontifications of journalist Marshall Pruett. Otherwise, the other interviewees including Caitlin Jenner (formerly the race driver and Olympic athlete Bruce Jenner), Doug Boles of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, F1’s Bernie Eccelstone, racer David Hobbs – along with archival footage of Trueman, Paul Newman and Bill Cosby (an investor in Ribbs’ IndyCar foray), made for wonderful storytelling.



This documentary is a fitting tribute to a great racing driver who performed any time he was given a break. It’s a story from which we all can learn. The film is currently running on Netflix and is available on DVD from Chassy Media.

5/5 stars.
 

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Discussion Starter #239

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Discussion Starter #240
A fellow member of Lotus Talk I don’t know sent this:


GLB, was reading through an old thread of mine and saw this quote of yours. You're a smart man!

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Thought a bit more elaboration might help some ppl.

1. I bought an FM stereo receiver yrs ago. (in the garage now.) I chose the less of the 2 models, not needing the extra power.

Then, I was stuck using a remote where a number of buttons were not functional. Annoying for years...

2. Wife was looking at ruby rings. IIRC, 2 choices: lab grown ruby (bigger, less expensive, but not the same depth of color) vs. real ruby.

She was torn.

"Lorraine, you are particular. When we order sandwiches, you need to know if it's real turkey or turkey roll.

"Do you want to look at your hand for years to come and think you bought RUBY ROLL??"

She bought the real one.

3. Very large kitchen expansion with huge amt of counter surface. She knew granite would be expensive, was considering something less.

"Babe, we're spending $150k on blowing out the whole side of the house.

"You cannot walk into the kitchen every morning and think "I should have gotten granite".

"Buy it."

(great, another $10k spent....) But, I meant it.

Don't cheap out on stuff you're going to use and see every day.

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A couple of other ppl used this other technique. Couldn’t decide between two colors (Maybe).

“Flip a coin and if you feel unhappy with the outcome, you really wanted the other choice.”

Said it worked for him.

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Customer called and, among other things, wanted to know how to make his slightly foreign voice sound more friendly. I told him to smile when he talked on the phone. No idea how I knew that, but the speech therapist I was dating said I was right (for a change.)

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Guy had wet floors, but didn’t know if it was from condensation or moisture coming up through the floor.

“Tightly tape a piece of clear plastic or ~ plastic wrap to the floor on all sides. If there is moisture on top of the plastic the next day, it’s condensation. If not, the issue is water coming up.

(This caused another guy on LT to thank me 2 weeks ago.)
 
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