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Discussion Starter #241
New Study Says Expensive Cars Are Bought by Jerks Who Won't Yield
An experiment shows that for every $1000 increase in a car's price, the odds of that driver yielding to a pedestrian in a crosswalk decrease by 3 percent.







Excuse us if you've already devoured the latest volume of the Journal of Transport & Health, but the March issue contains the results of a novel experiment that tested a cherished automotive stereotype. The study is entitled "Estimated Car Cost as a Predictor of Driver Yielding Behavior for Pedestrians," but you can think of it as, "Are BMW drivers really jerks or what?"

Okay, so it was more nuanced than that. The authors of the study sent four pedestrians—black female, black male, white female, white male—to crosswalks in the Las Vegas area to see how many drivers would yield. The overall results were pretty dismal, with a yield rate of only about 28 percent out of 461 cars. Cars yielded more often to female and white pedestrians than male and nonwhite pedestrians, although not enough either way to register as statistically significant. The only factor that consistently predicted yielding behavior was the value of the car. Notably, the study's authors estimated the book value on all 461 cars, so the 2004 Mercedes S-class that's worth $5000 didn't get ascribed automatic snob appeal.
https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a31136893/pedestrian-deaths-increase-2019/
The results—that a driver's likelihood of yielding declines by 3 percent for every $1000 increase in value of the car—wasn't a huge surprise. Prior studies in California have found that drivers of nicer cars are more likely to exhibit unethical behavior, cutting other drivers off at a four-way intersection and failing to yield to pedestrians. The explanation for this, according to the latest study, "may be that drivers of higher-value cars . . . felt a sense of superiority over other road users." Other studies have found that people with higher socioeconomic status have less empathy in general. But does driving a luxury car automatically make you a cretin?

When you're driving a fancy car, you're an avatar for everyone else's bad boss, useless trust-fund roommate, or absent workaholic father. And you're treated as such. That, perhaps, manifests in the way that you yourself drive.
As people who regularly switch perceived socioeconomic status in the course of a day—drive to work in a Sentra, drive home in a Senna—we can hypothesize that the behavior catalogued in this study could be part of a feedback loop. As in, you drive your Panamera Turbo like a dick because that's how you're treated by your fellow road users. Trust us: nobody yields to a Porsche. When you're driving a fancy car, you're an avatar for everyone else's bad boss, useless trust-fund roommate, or absent workaholic father. And you're treated as such. That, perhaps, manifests in the way that you yourself drive. Attitude begets attitude.

However, if you're driving an actual exotic, something way far up the food chain, behavior changes again. Everyone yields to the Rolls or the Lambo because cars like that are so over the top, they make you interesting by association. Plus: most people don't know anybody with a car like that; thus they can't associate it with anyone awful. The ultra-expensive car, and the driver, are a curiosity. What's that guy's deal? He probably invented that fake grass that goes between the pieces of sushi. And good for him! But the guy in the 911? He can wait an extra two turns at the four-way intersection. Probably deserves it.

Our not-scientific conclusions: If you expect fellow road users to demonstrate courtesy, you should drive either a 1984 Renault Alliance or a Lamborghini Aventador SVJ roadster. But either way, and to everybody in between: Yield at the damn crosswalks.
 

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Although interesting to read, a statistical study using only 461 cases does not seem like much of a study to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #243
You may be right. I will add, tho, that an earlier study showed ppl drove more aggressively if they perceived having an aggressive car. Posted somewhere here...
 

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Discussion Starter #244
Her: “I’m an incurable romantic.”


Me: “I’m the perfect antidote!"
 

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Discussion Starter #245
Listen to Betty Reid-Soskin fight off an intruder (while being quite old)


This is a great story, told by a wonderful woman.


(First story up)

PRX

“The Moth” has been my favorite radio show for the last 15 years (at least).
 

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Discussion Starter #246
My first car was a 1939 Buick sedan. One of the few cars I wish I'd kept.

Funnily tho, l realized I loved many of the Buicks of that era.

Saw this in Hemmings:

The 1938 Buick Century Convertible Phaeton offers great bang for the buck

THE ORIGINAL “BANKER’S HOT ROD”




Why we’re bullish about the 1938 Buick Century

https://www.hemmings.com/blog/articl...comments-block

----

1940 Buick Super Convertible Coupe:



 

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Discussion Starter #247
Garlic:



I am giving you some info that will improve your health for years to come. Remember, no hugging or kissing!!!



A few years ago, I required two oral surgeries. Back then, I smoked a bit and that retards healing.



Ex-girlfriend Jane flew in to care for me. Jane eventually became a nurse, but previously was a good-selling writer, model, actress, producer (#1 show on MTV for 4 years). She is very smart; sometimes I think she may be a genius.



As soon as I could eat semi-solid food, I began eating raw garlic. As I had to look at the wounds every day, the acceleration in healing was shocking.



Both surgeons were equally surprised. I carefully explained the garlic regimen. They seemed a bit dubious.



I asked a pulmonologist I know about garlic. She said that although her people came from India and her husband is Jewish, both families relied heavily on garlic for generations.



Eventually, I (somewhat gently) confronted my surgeons. “Look, you guys cut into peoples’ mouths for a living. I am showing you a very low cost way to speed the healing in all of them. Wouldn’t faster healing mean fewer infections and therefore less work for you and less pain for your patients?”



They agreed. I’ve no idea what they do.



BONUS JOKE: Oral surgery means you can lick your own wounds.



While doing research on the topic, Jane just found the following report:



Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine



Garlic: a review of potential therapeutic effects



Cardiovascular Disease: Prevents and treats these. Lowers blood pressure, prevents atherosclerosis, reduces serum cholesterol and triglycerides, inhibition of platelet aggregation, increases fibrinolytic activity.



Anti-Tumor: Garlic contains a large number of potent bioactive compounds. Reduced developments of some tumors in rodents. (Colon, liver, prostate, mammary gland, esophagus, lung, skin and stomach in human and rodent studies.



Diabetes, hepatoxicity, anti-microbial effect, anti-protozoal properties, antifungal, antiviral. These are all covered and pretty damn suprising.



Garlic: a review of potential therapeutic effects

NO HUGGING!

 

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Ever wonder why no one would get near you?
 

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Discussion Starter #249
Nah. That started well before I used garlic.......
 

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Discussion Starter #250
A Life of Speed: The Juan Manuel Fangio Story (2020)


A fan of Fangio, I very much liked this. Debuted on Netflix; no idea where else to find it.
 

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Discussion Starter #251
As Paramedic Leaves Her House Heading To Her Night-Shift, Entire Block Applauds Her With Gratitude.

We have read stories about first responders being shunned by landlords and others mad with fear.

So i thought a little balance was in order.

In England, 22 year old Tayla Porter was heading out to her 5:00 pm shift at Basingstoke and North Hampshire Hospital where she works as an Emergency Care Assistant/ Paramedic.

She has been working double-shifts, and she was tired.

Exhausted.

As soon as she stepped outside to walk to her car, she was greeted by her neighbors clapping and cheering her on…. and thanking her.

All the whilst practicing social distancing.




Overwhelmed with this show of gratitude, Tayla broke down in happy tears.

Said her mother Ali, “It was overwhelming for all of us. Tayla just couldn't believe it. She couldn't believe that people would even notice what she's doing. She just loves her job. I had no idea the whole street would come out. I just thought it might be our next door neighbours and the house opposite.

What I didn't realise was that every single house had at least one person come out to clap her.

It carried on all the way up our street and you could hear them clapping all the way up the next street too.

It was so emotional, I could barely speak. It was just overwhelming pride."

Tayla had missed her sisters birthday the day before because of the great need for those fighting the coronavirus on the frontline, so that a neighbor placed a slice of homemade cake on the top of Tayla’s car.

“There's been some nights where Tayla's come back and we've had to sit down and she’s had a bit of a cry from being exhausted.

She's seeing things that are quite scary. But she goes out there and puts a brave face on.

We don't know enough about coronavirus and that's not the only thing they're facing out there."

Said her father Phil, “It's been so overwhelming. It's amazing how everyone has come together. I feel like our village is closer.

You've got more time for people and appreciate them more now.

It brings you closer.”

Now this is how we feel towards our first-responders.

With gratitude and admiration in our hearts.

You are indeed in our debt. (Oops, writer got that backwards...gb)

Respect!

And to those that serve us in our time of great need from the supermarket to the pharmacy and beyond….

Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #252
Another Terrific Movie

I wrote about how much I enjoyed the film “Yesterday”, in which almost the entire world has forgotten the Beatles entirely.

Everyone I know loved that movie.

Then, I saw another wonderful film “Blinded by the Light”, about a Pakistani youngster living in England finds himself and his voice through Bruce Springsteen music.

Many ppl in England hated the Pakistanis who’d moved there, so our hero doesn’t have an easy time of it.

But, inspired by The Boss, he keeps writing (prose, poems, lyrics) and gets writing jobs. This is based on a true story.

I repeat this is a wonderful film.

Blinded by the Light (2019)

Critics Consensus:
Like a life-affirming rock anthem, Blinded by the Light hits familiar chords with confidence and flair, building to a conclusion that leaves audiences cheering for an encore

1987. When music fanatic Javed discovers the illustrious back catalogue of The Boss his world is turned upside down; already a creative soul his passion for music and writing is set alight by the songs of the working-class poet, whose lyrics feel all too familiar to the aspirational teenager. Yearning to escape his rundown hometown and the rules of his traditional Pakistani household, Javed finds himself caught in between two worlds and must discover if he too is Born to Run...
 

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Discussion Starter #253
I am not often envious, but I know some of our friends here have patents. Of that, I am jealous.

As a kid, I always thought I’d invent something cool.

1. I was installing an “automatic” door sweep at my chiropractor’s office. The door had been cut to clear the rug. This left a large gap at the door’s bottom and made the waiting room quite cold. The sweep I was installing would press down when its lever hit the jamb.

So, I envisioned a ramped door hinge. Instead of flat surfaces, they’d be at an angle. So, when the door opened it would clear the rug and still seal at the threshold.

Gee, I thought, doors could close using gravity.

But, this was already patented.

2. In the early 70s, very few people had cars had heated seats. Or a wife who hated cold as much as mine.

We got a decent quality seat cover and added a SAAB (IIRC) seat heater to its underside, with some insulation to protect the seat.

Then, off to Rutgers to try a patent search.

No dice: No new technology and/or used in new ways. No patent.


3. In a 944 Turbo with my friend and neighbor, I had an idea. The car had been confiscated by the FBI, where my friend worked.

A drug dealer had owned the car. You could tell because the entire hatch area was filled by two giant living room-type speakers.

He was showing me the hidden micro-switches that controlled the recordings in the car. He was often undercover.

“Hey, you follow people in this car, right?”

He did.

I suggested that I put each front light on individual hidden switches. He could have head and parking lights. Then, just head lights. Or, a combination of lights being out or on.

I knew this was a good idea.

It was, he assured me. The FBI thought of it in the 30s or 40s.


4. The big one.

My wife needed a stepladder to reach anything high up in the kitchen cabinets above the counter. I saw her do this and had an idea.

We could use the vacant kick plate area to hide a pop-up step or two.

Press the kick plate in the corner, the spring-loaded step comes out and rises up.

We build 3 prototypes, including one what simply attached to the lower cabinet doors.

“People will love these, for new kitchens and for retrofitting existing ones”, I told Lorraine.

Now, I didn’t want to manufacture and market any of this. I just wanted big checks from cabinet stores and makers.

Everyone I ran this by thought it was a great idea. Yes, I’m aware that if one is inventing for the kitchen or bathroom, there is little chance of success.

Two of us did patent searches on line. Neither told the other about how and what we searched.

We found nothing to dissuade us.

Then, off to the patent attorney.

She was a tall, gorgeous blonde. An actual 10.

She loved the idea and gushed over it. She was impressed by the prototypes. She needed some for her closet and her kitchen. Her friends would all need them too.

At this point, I forgot a rule of mine: All lawyers are salespeople during the first meeting. Not that it would have mattered.

Gary, my partner, was in heaven, with a faraway look on his face.

“Gary, I’m guessing you’re thinking about what color Aston-Martin you want”.

I was right. He’s into color.

So, $900 later, we had a patent search started for us.

We were going to be rich!


Not so fast, people whose names begin with “G”.

I started printing out the patents upon which we would infringe. When that reached over an inch, I stopped.

It would make better reading if I followed “stopped” with “sobbed”, but I didn’t. I just went back to my day job.
 

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Back when I was young and full of hope, a friend of mine told me that (the collective) everyone is thinking of everything you are all of the time. So, if you believe you have an original thought or idea, apply for a patent or a copyright asap before someone else does. To document it in as much detail as possible and send it to yourself registered Mail for irrefutable proof of it's time of origin is a good start (although personally I have never had any use for this advise...?)
 

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Discussion Starter #255
Good stuff.

A friend of mine with a few patents told me that if your idea is for the bathroom or kitchen, it's already been patented.
 

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Discussion Starter #256
I want to be cremated and…

…have my ashes spread by low flying plane over a Catholic girls’ school on a hot, humid day when they’re sweating from some outdoor recreation.
 

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Discussion Starter #257
"I want a girl with a good head on her shoulders. I hate necks."

Steve Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #258
Movie news:

I saw that the original "The Taking of Pelham 123" was on and realized I'd not seen that in a long time. The remake was the last version I saw.

Rotten Tomatoes gave the original 100% on the Critics Side!


It was wonderful and funnier than I remembered. Great casting too. I rate it tops.

g
 

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Discussion Starter #259
Inept Friends
continued

Walter was a good guy. He had a 122S Volvo he wanted help with. But, he kept showing up at my garage without the shop manual and I knew zip about Volvos.

Finally, I told him to put the manual in a strong plastic bag in the trunk because I didn’t want to waste any more time.

He didn’t like the way his car handled and bought much larger sway bars, which began to tear out the brackets. He got those welded.

Walter asked me to take his car thru our test turn, a ~ 70 mph highway exit. I did, but he wasn’t really happy that I went thru the turn about 10 mph faster than he. OK, but I was doing only what he asked of me.


He eventually rolled the car. We were at his friend’s body shop taking the mechanicals out. Walter was very strong and yanked on something so hard the car almost fell on us. Geez, if I were to get crushed, I didn’t want it to be under a frigging Volvo.

A fellow pulled into the body shop to get an estimate on repainting his long Chevy. But, he’d already tried using house paint all over the car.

Body shop owner: “I am not interested in taking this car on, but I have a suggestion.”

Driver: “What’s that?”

Body shop owner: “Next time, try aluminum siding.”
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Walter got a newer, slightly larger 122S, He was dismayed that the distributors were quite different and #1 wire on the old unit was not near #1 on the new distributor. He and his friends just stared at the engine, seeming a bit confused.

I sighed, knelt down and moved all the plug wires in the distributor cap in the correct firing order. They seemed surprised.
---
Deferred gratification was not part of his makeup.

We used to frequent a place with a good pinball machine while in college.

One day the maintenance guy for the machine came in. We mildly complained that this was a difficult game and almost impossible to win a free game on.

Guy adjusted it, then watched Walter play. Walter could not control himself and clearly demonstrated to the maintenance guy he’d made things too easy. He reset it.
---------

I told Walter how to raise the house he’d just purchased. I stressed that the keys were patience and going up in very small increments.

So, it went along for a while with no broken pipes, cracked masonry or plaster.

But, again, Walt couldn’t help himself and turned the adjustable lolly columns too much too soon.

Yes, pipes, masonry and plaster all came apart. Of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #260
I own an XRS and this thing interests me. gb



257-HP Toyota GR Corolla Turbocharged Hot Hatch Is Coming


With the same turbo three-cylinder as the rally-inspired GR Yaris, this car aims to prove that a Corolla can be as cool as a GTI.




illustration only


  • Toyota is working on a hot-hatch version of the Corolla that will wear the Gazoo Racing (GR) nameplate.
  • It will use the same turbocharged 1.6-liter three-cylinder engine as the GR Yaris sold elsewhere.
  • Expect the GR Corolla to arrive in the U.S. in 2022 with a starting price around $30,000.

This story originally appeared in the May 2020 issue of Car and Driver as part of our 25 Cars Worth Waiting For package. Our sneak preview of the most exciting cars coming in the next few years draws on knowledge from leaked product-development plans, spy photos, and loose-lipped insiders mixed in with information that has already been officially released. The reporting for this story was completed in February and early March, before the auto industry began feeling major effects of the coronavirus pandemic. As many automakers are now delaying or pausing development programs, the debut and on-sale dates reported here may change.

A hot-hatch version of the Corolla is coming soon wearing a GR badge (for "Gazoo Racing"). It'll be Toyota's first sporty compact since the high-revving Corolla XRS from the mid-2000s. This car also will serve as an apology to Americans who are upset that we're not getting the awesome rally-inspired GR Yaris. (That car is based on the global Yaris, while the U.S.-market Yaris is a rebadged Mazda 2.) The GR Corolla should land in 2022, with a starting price around $30,000.
The GR Corolla will use the mighty turbocharged hamster wheel from the GR Yaris that pumps out 257 horsepower and 266 pound-feet of torque from just three cylinders displacing 1.6 liters. We wouldn't count on the GR Yaris's all-wheel-drive system making it stateside, but Toyota will have to offer a six-speed manual transmission in order for the GR Corolla to be considered a driver's car.

The same TNGA underpinnings as the standard Corolla will be in play, but upgraded with a stiffer suspension tune, bigger brakes, and larger wheels wrapped in grippy summer tires.

Toyota is working hard to shed its reputation for being boring—a perception that is closely tied to the Corolla name. We appreciate that Toyota still offers it with a manual, but the 169-hp pseudo-sporty XSE that currently occupies the sportiest spot in the line just isn't enough. A true high-performance version with a strong engine and legitimate chassis upgrades could convince people that a Corolla can be as cool as a Volkswagen Golf GTI.
 
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