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Has anyone here toyed with nitrogen filled tires? I have a neighbor who works at a Mazda dealership who tells me that they are filling everything from RX-8's to 'Vettes with nitrogen. Lats longer, better fuel economy etc.. Anyone tried it?
 

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you maintain (fairly) the same tire pressure regardless of the outside temp. Don't believe it gives better fuel economy though.
 

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No, you can't change the gas laws, so tire pressure still increases with temperature. The idea using nitrogen is to remove the water vapour component from the gas in the tire. In practice I've found that nitrogen gives the same pressure rise with temperature as plain air, but I imagine it depends on humidity. In any case it always seems moot if the tire is mounted with the typical soapy water mix.
 

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you maintain (fairly) the same tire pressure regardless of the outside temp. Don't believe it gives better fuel economy though.
In my house we obey the laws of thermodynamics.
 

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You may maintain a more consistent pressure over different temperatures with a dry gas as compared to a humid gas.

Notes:

1. I did NOT say pressure would stay the same regardless of temperature.
2. I did NOT imply that any specific gas expands more or less than air.
3. I DID imply that that water vapor in whatever you fill your tires with can be the biggest culprit in pressure changes with temperature.
4. Using compressed air that's run through a very good dryer is probably just as pressure stable as nitrogen is. The whole reason nitrogen is dry is because when they isolate it they run it through a very good dryer.
5. Some moisture may indeed get into your tire from the soapy-water solution used to set the bead. After it has evaporated, three or four deflate/inflate cycles would exchange most of that humid gas.

xtn
 

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hmm...I still don't see how my response defied laws of physics..:shrug:
I thought we were talking about why one would use Nitrogen to fill tires
 

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haha! :p

I guess the problem is that it doesn't remove them...when you get a flat or take the tire off the wheel...CO2 returns to atmosphere... :(

The article also states that Ferrari used a mixture of 50% HFC R404A and 50% CO2 rather than CO2 that most the news article had reported.

Nitrogen may be very helpful on tracks like California Speedway where you stress the right tires a lot more and usually have to run lower cold tire pressures...where nitrogen can help reduce the difference in pressure from cold to hot.
 

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The only advantage I've ever heard for this is that supposedly it retards gradual pressure loss ("slow leak") over time for long-term STREET use, and really does not have any appreciable track advantage.

But what do I know? :shrug: I just used RETARD in a sentence in my post. :rolleyes:
 

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I just fart in my tires.

It will cost you more to use Nitrogen than any possible savings you'd get from fuel economy (assuming you do get any better mpg numbers).

In my old race car I used Nitrogen, but to be honest I couldn't tell the difference, maybe because our races were sprint races that last only 20-30 minutes.

As for Ferrari F1 mix, I believe Bridgestone made the tire for Ferrari specifically to be used with that gas mixture, unfair advantage?? Maybe, but that is the benefit of building a car for the tires and the tires for a car for essentially one team -- however, I'm sure no such close bond exists between Ferrari and Bridgestone now -- I'm sure ;)
 

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haha! :p

I guess the problem is that it doesn't remove them...when you get a flat or take the tire off the wheel...CO2 returns to atmosphere... :(

The article also states that Ferrari used a mixture of 50% HFC R404A and 50% CO2 rather than CO2 that most the news article had reported.

Nitrogen may be very helpful on tracks like California Speedway where you stress the right tires a lot more and usually have to run lower cold tire pressures...where nitrogen can help reduce the difference in pressure from cold to hot.
I can see now the hazmat teams, all rushing out to the scenes of blowouts! :panic: rotfl
 
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