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At Concorso Italiano today, a vendor was showing a Noble M12 GTO. Talking to them a bit, I learned that they're importing this car to the US using the same loopholes that allowed the S1 to be brought in and registered. So, if you're looking for a bit more performance than an Elise and have the money to spend ($~95k), you might want to check it out. It'll have a turbocharged V6 (Ford Duratec). Gray Sport Racing is the company importing these cars and doing the engine work - email is [email protected].
 

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...but the S1 was never really 100% legal in the US.

I'd be willing to bet that you could get a show & display registration on a Noble, however.
 

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BrianK said:
...but the S1 was never really 100% legal in the US.

I'd be willing to bet that you could get a show & display registration on a Noble, however.
Those are very limited in total miles per year, right? Something like 2000 miles or ?

I wonder if people just roll back the odometers.
 

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I'm pretty sure you can't get the 'show & display' unless the car is no longer in production and has historical significance. And yes, you're mileage limited to some insanely low amount as Randy suggested.
 

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In determining whether a vehicle is eligible for importation for show or display, NHTSA will consider the following factors, among others:

  1. Whether a vehicle of the same make, model, and model year was manufactured and certified for sale in the United States.
  2. Whether a vehicle of the same make, model, and model year has been determined eligible for importation pursuant to 49 CFR Part 593.
  3. Whether the vehicle is currently in production.
  4. Whether more than 500 of the vehicles were produced.
  5. Whether the vehicle is a kit car, replica, or special construction vehicle.
If the answer to any of the above is affirmative, you should not expect NHTSA to grant permission for importation. If the answer to item 4 is affirmative, the applicant must establish that the vehicle is of exceptional technological and/or historical significance.

ON-ROAD USE

A vehicle eligible for Show or Display may receive NHTSA approval to be driven on the highway. The odometer must not register more than 2,500 miles in a 12-month period. NHTSA approval of limited on-road use is to allow the vehicle to be driven to and from nearby displays of similar automobiles. Another reason permission is granted is to maintain the vehicle’s engine, braking, lighting, and other dynamic systems in good working order. The vehicle is still required to meet EPA requirements. If the original engine in the vehicle will be replaced with a non-original engine to meet EPA requirements, it must be identified in your application since it may impact on the technological or historical significance of the vehicle.
 

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Feels like a big elise. Brakes aren't up to the performance of the rest of the car though. (130mph to 70mph for the first corner had them wilting after 5 laps.... AP racing 4-pot vented discs too!)

I did some hot laps in one on a supercar day at mallory park track in England.

Craigy
 

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Was with Matt when we talked to them. There selling them as kit cars to make them street legal. However the high end v-6 twin turbo (more hp then the Euro) was a track only version.
 
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