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Discussion Starter #1
I'm close to ordering the Whiteline Caster/Anti-lift kit for my 2001 Toyota Celica and had a question about suspension geometry stuff. The caster kit is an offset bushing that moves the pivot of the front control arm. Now since an increase in caster leads to more camber change with steering input wouldn't this lead to an increase in posative camber for the inner wheel. My car does not have a LSD so wouldn't the increase in positive tire for the inside tire lead to more inner wheel spin under power? This would lead to a lower limit as I will spin the inner tire more easily? Or is there a flaw in my thinking?

Also what kind of grease would you suggest for this bushing? I've heard that I should use Al based grease such as Schaffers or marine grease. Should I worry about the polyurethane compound binding?
 

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00 scrub said:
I'm close to ordering the Whiteline Caster/Anti-lift kit for my 2001 Toyota Celica and had a question about suspension geometry stuff. The caster kit is an offset bushing that moves the pivot of the front control arm. Now since an increase in caster leads to more camber change with steering input wouldn't this lead to an increase in posative camber for the inner wheel. My car does not have a LSD so wouldn't the increase in positive tire for the inside tire lead to more inner wheel spin under power? This would lead to a lower limit as I will spin the inner tire more easily? Or is there a flaw in my thinking?

Also what kind of grease would you suggest for this bushing? I've heard that I should use Al based grease such as Schaffers or marine grease. Should I worry about the polyurethane compound binding?
I think you are correct in that an increase in caster will cause your camber curves to change and yes, the more positive camber wheel affect either understeer or wheel spin. I don't have much experience with FWD cars.

I always used Bushing Lubricant, but it has to be something that will not wash away easily. Slick 50 grease lubricant is another people use.
 

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00 scrub, you are barking up the wrong tree.

The Celica has over 60% of its weight up front and 22mm/17mm front/rear anti-roll bars. This is a recipe for massive understeer and inside the wheel spin.

No alignment changes in the world will fix either.
You have to remove the front anti-roll bar. It is the only thing that works, it is free, and kills two birds with one stone.

A rear-only anti-roll bar setup acts like a limited slip. The rear inside wheel will lift before the inside front does. Traction is greatly increased on the inside front wheel and limits wheel spin.

Having all/most of the roll stiffness at the rear makes the car handle more neutral mid corner. It reduces the amount of grip at the rear and increases the amont of grip up front. This results in the amount of front/rear tire grip more closely matching the car's front/rear weight distribution.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Im afraid of excessive oversteer with no front bar. The rear suspension of the Celica (BTW I'm using stock sway bars, springs, and shocks, although they may be changed soon) has toe out roll steer, thus creating a kind of oversteer effect. A smaller front sway bar I wouldn't mind trying out (although the install is not simple), but I don't know of anyone who makes one with less stiffness than stock.

My idea behind wanting the extra caster is to improve turn in. The bushing also adds some more anti-lift to the front suspension which would perhaps reduce the non inside wheel spin-induced understeer(I wonder if that made sense). I guess at my next autocross event it wouldn't hurt to try unhooking my front sway bar endlinks and trying it out. Wouldn't the lack of front roll stiffness cause me to run out of travel on tight hairpins and such as well?

Anyone else got input?
 
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