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Obama to require 35 mpg Combined car and truck Standard by 2016

Is this for Cars made in America? Or all cars sold? If it is, what are your thoughts? I just heard about this yesterday and I was wondering what the car market's going to be like in 2016...:shrug:
It's going to be like the mid 70's again... All the cool cars will disappear and we'll be left with a bunch of ugly boxes with wheels... In the end I think our only hope to keep the sports car alive will fall on electric car technology and carbon fiber composite frame/body structures...
 

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It's going to be like the mid 70's again... All the cool cars will disappear and we'll be left with a bunch of ugly boxes with wheels... In the end I think our only hope to keep the sports car alive will fall on electric car technology and carbon fiber composite frame/body structures...
Let's activate SKYNET now...:panic:
 

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I doubt this will affect low production car companies. But if it did, Lotus is certainly capable of doing a hybrid Elise. I think the average mpg would need to be 35, so if a small car company has one car that gets 45 - 60 mpg, that would take care of things. Imagine an electric drive Elise, that did 0 - 60 in 6.5 seconds, could travel up to 120mph, and go 100miles on electric drive alone... All for $10k more than a super charged Elise. That would not be hateful as a daily driver.

Personlly, I like the idea of small deisel powered cars, like Europe has. Americans drive vehicles that are far too big and heavy!
 

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In the end, that sort of legislation doesn't work very well. Best way to get people cut down is to make the fuel expensive. The market settles the rest.

He still has to get the law passed, and clunky, wasteful, special interest driven Congress may have something to say about that.
 

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Since the mpg requirement is a fleet average, how will they factor in electric cars? If a car company makes an electric car that they factor at 100 mpg and three gas cars that get 25 mpg, they would have a fleet average of 43 mpg. I am sure it's not so simple but if car companies make a couple of super high mileage vehicles (that few buy), they can bring their average way up.
 

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Is that 35mpg number the average or highway?? I believe its the average. Any one that drives their Elise on a flat highway knows it easily gets 30+on the highway now at 75 (80indicated). With our lousy 6th gear( useless on track and too tall for crusing)that has motor running at 3700-3800rpm. Put in a real 6th gear that lets motor loaf at say 2500rpms or less at 75 and we'd easily get 35-38mpg highway.:clap: Seen as we all get in the mid 20's+ around town as long as we stay off the 2nd cam, our existing car could probably meet that standard with no more than a better tranny!:bow:
One of the few things that could get me to buy a newer Elise would be if they'd improve the drivetrain ie tranny as I have never thought it to be ideally geared for our cars. I use my vehicle almost daily all summer as well as at track, so I do have a bit of a clue
 

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Since the mpg requirement is a fleet average, how will they factor in electric cars? If a car company makes an electric car that they factor at 100 mpg and three gas cars that get 25 mpg, they would have a fleet average of 43 mpg. I am sure it's not so simple but if car companies make a couple of super high mileage vehicles (that few buy), they can bring their average way up.
Easy to work out really if you do the calculation as consumption rather than mileage (like the EU figure - l/100km rather than mpg). Just need to know how many gallons are required to drive the average fleet a certain distance (with the electric cars requiring none).

But I'm with TrapperJohn - the CAFE system has been tried and has failed. Raising the price of fuel does work - that's why Europe has so many small efficient cars (its not because of the roads!).
 

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I would tend to agree that Lotus will not be heavily affected by this requirement if it were made law. In terms of vehicle averages, Lotus really doesn't tip the scale, they simply don't make up a high enough percentage of consumer cars. The information seems kind of vague, and directed toward american auto companies. If these standards were imposed for import cars (yeah, right) Lotus could always do what other manufacturers have done in the past:

Reclassify the Exige as a light truck to pass emission/milleage requirements. rotfl

I think getting rid of gas guzzling, Lotus crushing SUVs is a step in the right direction. It isn't the sports car afficianados who will REALLY be affected by legislation on emissions.
 

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I think getting rid of gas guzzling, Lotus crushing SUVs is a step in the right direction. It isn't the sports car afficianados who will REALLY be affected by legislation on emissions.

That may be fine in NYC. But in the wide open rural areas of the world, people need their lotus crushing SUVs. How else would I buy 6 palm trees and get them home from Lowes? Tow my boat to the launch? Fit my grandfather, father + wife, my wife, and 3 kids in the truck for a destination dinner on the waterfront? Take my 2 large dogs to the lake? Buy 2 stupid fence boards because my stupid dog ate two to escape? Tow 14 collumns on a trailer to a jobsite? This was all done within the last week, which was in no way atypical... For me, gas guzzling SUVs are a must and a means for me to be able to afford to be a sportscar aficionados on the weekends..

Plus, why don't you don't think the 9 MPG Ferrari and Lamborghini’s will be affected? The 18 MPG CLK500 or 911s will be hurting too. Nothing with HP and torque other than our little fiberglass toys will go unaffected.

The only saving grace that might save our precious sports car industry is if the niche manufacturers are allowed to pay their way to exemption through "gas guzzler taxes" like in the past. I think this will be the case.
 

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Usually these regulations only apply to companies over a sertain production level. That said, Lotus is at the forefront of not only weight reduction but also advanced powertain development. They have a division committed soley to the engineering of alternative fuel engines. Many companies seek their assistance in the compliance with these types of concerns.

The Evora and Elise are almost there as they exist now. If anything, these new regulations will ensure the health of Lotus engineering for years to come.
 

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Yes I think it will be great for lotus if they are excluded due to low volume (just like they have exemptions on some other things). This way, the lotus cars branch isn't affected.


Lotus Engineering division would benefit greatly from this, as mentioned
 

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CAFE is like pushing a rope, IMHO. A far better solution would be an annual registration "tax" on cars that is based on how well they do. CAFE (and the gas guzzler tax) are one time charges that essentially get financed by the first buyer as a minor bump in the payment and then that's it. An annual fee for the life of the vehicle would make people want to buy cars with less fees, since the fee will ultimately make a car harder to sell as it gets older. It always helps get older, inefficient cars off the roads in 15 or 20 years as they no longer make economic sense to operate.

But that's my two cents.

Steve
 

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This will probably be the final nail in the coffin for the domestic auto makers. Way to go, O.
 

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The sky is falling.
 

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CAFE is like pushing a rope, IMHO. A far better solution would be an annual registration "tax" on cars that is based on how well they do. CAFE (and the gas guzzler tax) are one time charges that essentially get financed by the first buyer as a minor bump in the payment and then that's it. An annual fee for the life of the vehicle would make people want to buy cars with less fees, since the fee will ultimately make a car harder to sell as it gets older. It always helps get older, inefficient cars off the roads in 15 or 20 years as they no longer make economic sense to operate.

But that's my two cents.

Steve

sooo... tax the hell out of the people who cannot afford newer more efficient cars to the point where they can no longer drive to work?

This whole gas thing is rediculous. Why not leave the free market alone. People will buy what they can afford to own. The wealthy have options.

What does it all come down to? Smoke fumes in the air or the production of huge acid boxes? It's all bad for the environment. When fuel gets too expensive to use as propulsion, we move to the next thing.
 
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