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Weirdest thing. I went ahead and did a full detail this morning while we have the weather here to do so (2006 Elise). Afterwards I made a joke to my wife that I should probably take it for a test drive to make sure I washed it correctly. When I got in and started it up it sounded really odd. Like hesitating, burping, and almost stalling out. I got out to see the engine was shaking and the whole car was vibrating and shaking. If I pushed the accelerator a little bit (2k - 3k) it would settle out. I used the Torque app on my phone to check to see if there were and faults. It came back with 'cylinder #3 misfire'. I shut it down and pulled the spark plug cover to see a bit of water in the ditch. I went ahead and pulled the coil packs. I didn't see any moisture, but I blew out the tubes and coils then reassembled. Also noticed a bit of water around the MAF and wiring harnesses over there so I blew those off too. Got back in and started it up and it ran like a champ. Cleared the codes and took it for a good drive - ~20 miles city driving. Got back home still sounding good and no codes.

When rinsing, I stayed mindful not to go all Katrina on the engine, but used enough water to rinse the suds away.

Anything like this ever happen to you guys?
Was it an anomaly?
Did I use the wrong polishing compound?
Maybe some water got into the coils or MAF?
Any other thoughts?
 

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Washed mine a week ago today. Immediately post wash it posted the dreaded Check Engine Light and sulked into limp mode. The obd reader gave me a throttle position code which I cleared. The light and limp went away and it's run great ever since including a 200-mile twisty road jaunt mid week. My guess is avoiding the all Katrina rinse in the engine area is the answer.
 

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I had the same issue a couple years ago after a wash even though I was being careful. Got a throttle body code. I got all panicky . Once it dried out the next day everything ran fine. Now I just cover the engine bay vents if I'm gonna wash it ... Or whenever you remove the rear clam thats a great time to wash it ... I tend to have to do this fairly often

Sent from my LM-Q910 using Tapatalk
 

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I was going to post a question about washing the rear of the car. How careful do you need to keep water from going into the engine vents? I was guessing not too careful since rain water will go in there. But recently I've seen some corrosion in my engine bay (bolts) and that isn't good. My car is 14 years old and starts corroding once I buy it? Now I think water should be kept out at all costs. This thread shows more reasons for that, although I have never had issues with my engine running after a wash.
 

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Mine did that once (Exige S). I just limit the amount of water I use to rinse off the suds now. I should probably make a plastic cover with suction cups just to limit the water.

San
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was going to post a question about washing the rear of the car. How careful do you need to keep water from going into the engine vents? I was guessing not too careful since rain water will go in there. But recently I've seen some corrosion in my engine bay (bolts) and that isn't good. My car is 14 years old and starts corroding once I buy it? Now I think water should be kept out at all costs. This thread shows more reasons for that, although I have never had issues with my engine running after a wash.
I'm convinced that there is a happy medium here. Rain should be fine in moderation. Water hoses, on the other hand, will concentrate a lot more water into places they don't belong. Next time I wash I will cover the engine with some plastic before getting it wet. Pretty sure if I didn't drive it today after the wash it would've been fine by tomorrow and I would never discovered this issue.
 

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Did you slather the spark tubes in dielectric grease when you cleaned it all?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Did you slather the spark tubes in dielectric grease when you cleaned it all?
Great question, and no. I just swapped my plugs last week and skipped that option. I skipped it again when I messed with them today. I think maybe I will do that before my next wash to rule that out.
 

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+1 million for dielectric grease. Don't skimp it is worth it. Tommy
 

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Its actually very common for twin cam I/L4 engines to get water in the plug holes after washing and cause a misfire. It takes very little water to do this, Ive even seen a miss after a wash that I couldnt even see any water in the hole. The reason for this is obvious as the plugs are in the cam/rocker "valley" and that causes a pooling effect of the water, spilling into the plug hole. While dielectric grease will lessen this possibility, it will not negate it, i.e. it can still occur sometimes. When I worked at Acura we had a wash bay where lot boys washed cars after work was done, they were explicitly told not to wash engines unless told too. Many a time I had too go into the wash bay and blow air out of spark plug tubes and wires on integras or feather the throttle to get them started to pull them back in the shop. Leaving the engine running can actually lessen the liklyhood of this happening, I think the air fets ionized and reduces vapor ingress and the heat will just evaporate what does get in. When I do that I do leave the engine running for ~15 min after the cleaning, but have still rarely had the car misfire after sitting a bit then restarting. The best answer is to cover the engine with a bag before washing, but be carefull of the exhaust melting that as that would be easy. Its not a good idea to wash wile the engine is hot anyhow, as the wax will wash off more on the hot fiberglass, and waxing on a hot surface isnt recommended either. I could be wrong there as Im not a detailer, but see those ideas to be of reasonable assertion. I cannot speak intelligently on the toyota MAF, as Im primarily a honda tech and most toyotas I work on are 6 or 8 cly (lexus). I do think Ive never replaced or had issues with toyota MAFs.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Its actually very common for twin cam I/L4 engines to get water in the plug holes after washing and cause a misfire. It takes very little water to do this, Ive even seen a miss after a wash that I couldnt even see any water in the hole. The reason for this is obvious as the plugs are in the cam/rocker "valley" and that causes a pooling effect of the water, spilling into the plug hole. While dielectric grease will lessen this possibility, it will not negate it, i.e. it can still occur sometimes. When I worked at Acura we had a wash bay where lot boys washed cars after work was done, they were explicitly told not to wash engines unless told too. Many a time I had too go into the wash bay and blow air out of spark plug tubes and wires on integras or feather the throttle to get them started to pull them back in the shop. Leaving the engine running can actually lessen the liklyhood of this happening, I think the air fets ionized and reduces vapor ingress and the heat will just evaporate what does get in. When I do that I do leave the engine running for ~15 min after the cleaning, but have still rarely had the car misfire after sitting a bit then restarting. The best answer is to cover the engine with a bag before washing, but be carefull of the exhaust melting that as that would be easy. Its not a good idea to wash wile the engine is hot anyhow, as the wax will wash off more on the hot fiberglass, and waxing on a hot surface isnt recommended either. I could be wrong there as Im not a detailer, but see those ideas to be of reasonable assertion. I cannot speak intelligently on the toyota MAF, as Im primarily a honda tech and most toyotas I work on are 6 or 8 cly (lexus). I do think Ive never replaced or had issues with toyota MAFs.
Thanks for the great input. Is there a shower cap that'll fit the 2zz? :grin2:
 

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Geez, simply alliteratively slather and you'll be find. It's the reason most of us don't have this issue. Bought my car in 2005.
 

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I've washed my Elise countless times and never had that problem. But I never use a hose. I hand wash using a sponge.

So some water goes into the engine area but not a lot.
 

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wash Elise

I had the same problem many years ago (obviously) with mine when it was brand new. The service tech sealed the wiring connections in the engine bay - no problem afterwards.
 

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i had water arcing my electrical current into the head and grounding the spark. waters a big issue for the ignition coils. definitely lather them, and the connectors, in dielectric grease. thats what i did and its been a much smaller issue since then.
 

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When spraying the back, I would spray it sparingly on the lid area. Just enough to wet or rinse the soap off. Also, I spray from the side of the car instead of directly behind it. Preventing more water to shoot up straight thru the vents. Luckily, I haven't had any issues and can't really say if what I'm doing really helps. Glad it got sorted out for you.
 
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