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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Below are a few different oil filters you can put onto our motors..others are useable too. Among other things you need a high burst strength and an antidrainback valve along with a 3/4-16 thread. The "pad" that the oil filter's o-ring seals against is much larger than the OD of the stock filter, so larger diameter alternates can be considered and there is ample space for a taller filter too.

The Toyota 90915-10004 is the proper factory oil filter, and the one I'd suggest you use if you stay all Toyota. Lotus suggests the same one. The same sized 90915-YZZA1 in the PIC is the version Toyota dealers carry in stock, but it's a hair less nice than the 10004. The 10004 is not always carried in stock and may need to be ordered if you go to Toyota. Your Lotus dealer should have it though. You can also fit the Toytota 90915-YZZA2 which is the filter for the non GT-S Celicas but this is even smaller in size, about 3/4 inch shorter. The slightly larger oil filter used on the Lexus IS-300 will go right on and many use that one on the 2ZZ-GE engine.

I found a taller version of the Lexus filter. The best two versions I could find are the 209 by Mobil 1 and the 2009 by K&N. These are made by the same company (appears to be Champion) and are well made, but have slight differences from one another. The Mobil 1 filters down to 12 microns and the K&N is good to about 15-20 microns but flows better and is less restrictive. Most stock type filters do about 30 microns and cheapies do about 40. (This is the size of particles below which they don't filter.) The Mobil 1 was my choice as the flow should still be fine but it was not in stock so I got the K&N for about 10 bucks. It actually flows better than the Mobil 1 which may be a good idea for our high revving lumps.

I changed to Mobil 1 0W40 since it's getting colder out these days. That oil is factory fill in Porsches and AMG Mercedes and should be good enough for the high revs and loads at the 40 end.

For my next oil change I will put on a Canton Mecca high flow zero bypassing 8 micron oil filter. The 25-262 or 25-462 will go right on to our motors. This is an aluminum cased filter that has replaceable inserts and way better dirt capacity and filtering ability than normal filters but it costs about 100 bucks. Normal filters bypass above some oil pressure....so basically the filtering mostly takes place at the lower RPMs. When a filter bypasses, this means that some of the oil is allowed to pass AROUND the filter element and go directly into the motor as-is. Gasp.

 

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You know, I started reading this post before seeing who wrote it, and could instantly figure it out. I mean that as the highest of compliments, Stan! Another great tech tidbit, thank you very much for the info!

I have a general question about oil filters and warranties. I know I can do oil changes myself and not invalidate the warranty, but do manufacturers typically require that OEM parts be used? It seems like a logical thing for them to request, as there are proven differences between effectiveness of various oil filters. Perhaps a better way of phrasing that would be, *can* a manufacturer deny warranty repair work on engine internals if a non-OEM oil filter were used? I am a little reluctant to mess with anything on this engine until I see that there's no oil starvation problem with this motor in this application (to recap for those new to this subject, the early 2ZZGE motors in the Celica had an oil starvation problem under high cornering loads, but this has supposedly been fixed well before the introduction of the Elise).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
>>>*can* a manufacturer deny warranty repair work on engine internals if a non-OEM oil filter were used?<<<

Thanks!

No, just use filters that meet factory specs and you will be fine. If you use a major brand you will be fine. Otherwise noone would buy aftermarket filters. If you want the best Toyota filter, the 10004, you may wish to order a case as they are not generally stocked. Toyota and other companies make cheaper filters such as the YZZA1 to help the dealer offer lower priced oil changes. The YZZA1 costs about 5 bucks and the 10004 costs much more but I don't have a figure for it. It's important to use a filter that has all of the features of the stock filter. Such as the antidrainback valve, proper bypass, strong case. By the way the 10004 is heavier judging by hand feel than the YZZA1. There is also an even "better" Toyota filter from Toyota Racing Development which costs around 25 bucks.

The 10004 Toyota filter is actually quite nice...it's just a tiny thing though and many Celica folks claim that their dirt holding capacity is low. Like a vacuum with a small bag. They say that you must change them no later than about 3000 miles if you want the best filtering to take place, even if you run the oil longer. Many will change their oil at or before that mileage anyway. At least there is the option to go larger, higher flow, finer filtration for those wishing to pursue such avenues. When you look at the stock filter installed and observe the "pad" it presses against on the motor you can see that there is ample space to handle larger filters.
 

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Stan said:
Normal filters bypass above some oil pressure....so basically the filtering mostly takes place at the lower RPMs. When a filter bypasses, this means that some of the oil is allowed to pass AROUND the filter element and go directly into the motor as-is.
One nit-pik...

The filter's bypass doesn't open when the pressure gets high because of the RPMs. The bypass opens when the difference in pressure on each "side" of the filter exceeds a certain level. With a nice clean filter, that's flowing plenty of oil, the pressure differential should be very small. As a filter gets dirty, it gets more restrictive, and the pressure difference gets higher. A really dirty filter will get plugged enough to cause the bypass to open.

The pressure difference can also get high with cold thick oil, which is one reason not to rev a cold engine (cold thick oil can cause the bypass to open).

I doubt that the Elise's oil will get very dirty since it is supposed to be changed every 3,000 miles...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
>>>One nit-pik... The filter's bypass doesn't open when the pressure gets high because of the RPMs. The bypass opens when the difference in pressure on each "side" of the filter exceeds a certain level. With a nice clean filter, that's flowing plenty of oil, the pressure differential should be very small. <<<

True enough, it's the differential. But the pressure and flow in the oil system goes up with RPM. And the differential will therefore increase with Rs. So bypassing that occurs at high revs will tend to go away at normal revs. The only nonbypassing, high-flow, high filtration fit anything oil filters I know about are the Canton Meccas. They filter all of the oil all of the time, down to 8 microns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here is some more information about oil filter bypassing. The bypass valve opens fairly often, they claim.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Bypass Value

First you need to understand why the bypass valve is there. Under *ideal* conditions, the bypass valve will *never* open. Because, when it opens, the oil *by passes* the filter and goes on through to the motor, obviously unfiltered. It is a safety valve. However, in *real* operation, it opens often.


One example is when you start the motor when cold. The oil is thick and does not pass easily through the filtration medium, thus building up to a high pressure drop. So, the bypass valve opens to prevent oil-starvation of the motor. How long it stays open is dependent on how cold the oil is and how long it takes to get near operating temperature. When the pressure drop across the filtration medium drops below the bypass valve setting, then the bypass closes. Blipping the throttle while warming up is a good way to get the valve to open and send unfiltered oil to the motor. A steady warm-up rpm is probably a lot better.

Another example can occur when the motor is fully warmed. At idle, the oil pressure is about 15 to 20 psi, and the pressure drop across the filter is about 1 or 2 psi. You take off towards the redline, and quickly build oil pressure to the 70 to 80 psi range. During that full-throttle acceleration the pressure drop across the filter will exceed the bypass setting, and send unfiltered oil to the motor, until the pressure across the filter has time to equalize. During a drag race, shifting through the gears, the bypass will open several times.

A third example, which you should never experience with frequent oil and filter changes, is when a filter becomes clogged. A spin-on filter can commonly hold 10 to 20 grams of trash before it becomes fully clogged. The bypass valve opening is the only way to keep the motor from becoming oil-starved if the filter becomes clogged.
According to Purolator, the Honda OEM filter bypass setting is 12 to 14 psi, and that is how they build their motorcycle oil filter. WIX (NAPA Gold) builds their motorcycle and automobile oil filters with a bypass setting of 8 to 11 psi, while AC Delco builds theirs to a setting of 11 to 17 psi. How much do these differences matter? I don't think anyone knows, even the engineers, and each has its own set of advantages and disadvantages.

If you do lots of racing, you're probably better off with a higher bypass setting.
If you do lots of *cold* starting, especially in the winter, or seldom change your filter, I think you're better off with a lower bypass setting. However, with few exceptions, bypass pressures for spin-on filters run in the 8 to 17 psi range, and any of them should work acceptably.
 

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I've never heard of the bypass valve actuating unless the filter is plugged. This is a safety valve that should not come into action under normal use or higher rpms, cold start, etc. I'll check into this further.

Oil filters (actually all liquid filters) have lower particle efficiency when they are new. They get 'better' at removing particles when they begin to load up. Naturally they will begin restricting flow when they get too loaded. One of my customers in Germany, Mahle Filterwerke, could not understand why Americans changed their filters so often.

Use OEM oil filters and change them at the recommended intervals. Changing them sooner will result in reduced filtration. If you completely empty all the oil (including the coolers) this may be moot.

Steer clear of the quick change joints and the crappy filters they peddle.
 

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Stan said:
The best two versions I could find are the 209 by Mobil 1 and the 2009 by K&N. These are made by the same company (appears to be Champion) and are well made, but have slight differences from one another. The Mobil 1 filters down to 12 microns and the K&N is good to about 15-20 microns but flows better and is less restrictive.
Autobarn sells the Mobile 1 oil filter for $12:

http://www.autobarn.net/mob1higefoil.html
 

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Thank's for the good information.
I used this info and decided to get the K&N filter. It's on its way.

-doma
 

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doma said:
Thanks for the good information.
I used this info and decided to get the K&N filter. It's on its way.

-doma
I like the Mobil 1 and the K&N filters and the thing that tips the balance for me is the built-in nut that K&N puts on the filter. Nice touch!
:clap:
 

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when i looked up the 2009 by K&N, the car application chart had all fords, no lotus, no lexus, and no toyota. I wanted to make sure this is the proper filter because I am about to go get one for my car. Please let me know!!

If the 2009 by K&N is the right one, please let me know!!!!


Stan said:
Below are a few different oil filters you can put onto our motors..others are useable too. Among other things you need a high burst strength and an antidrainback valve along with a 3/4-16 thread. The "pad" that the oil filter's o-ring seals against is much larger than the OD of the stock filter, so larger diameter alternates can be considered and there is ample space for a taller filter too.

The Toyota 90915-10004 is the proper factory oil filter, and the one I'd suggest you use if you stay all Toyota. Lotus suggests the same one. The same sized 90915-YZZA1 in the PIC is the version Toyota dealers carry in stock, but it's a hair less nice than the 10004. The 10004 is not always carried in stock and may need to be ordered if you go to Toyota. Your Lotus dealer should have it though. You can also fit the Toytota 90915-YZZA2 which is the filter for the non GT-S Celicas but this is even smaller in size, about 3/4 inch shorter. The slightly larger oil filter used on the Lexus IS-300 will go right on and many use that one on the 2ZZ-GE engine.

I found a taller version of the Lexus filter. The best two versions I could find are the 209 by Mobil 1 and the 2009 by K&N. These are made by the same company (appears to be Champion) and are well made, but have slight differences from one another. The Mobil 1 filters down to 12 microns and the K&N is good to about 15-20 microns but flows better and is less restrictive. Most stock type filters do about 30 microns and cheapies do about 40. (This is the size of particles below which they don't filter.) The Mobil 1 was my choice as the flow should still be fine but it was not in stock so I got the K&N for about 10 bucks. It actually flows better than the Mobil 1 which may be a good idea for our high revving lumps.

I changed to Mobil 1 0W40 since it's getting colder out these days. That oil is factory fill in Porsches and AMG Mercedes and should be good enough for the high revs and loads at the 40 end.

For my next oil change I will put on a Canton Mecca high flow zero bypassing 8 micron oil filter. The 25-262 or 25-462 will go right on to our motors. This is an aluminum cased filter that has replaceable inserts and way better dirt capacity and filtering ability than normal filters but it costs about 100 bucks. Normal filters bypass above some oil pressure....so basically the filtering mostly takes place at the lower RPMs. When a filter bypasses, this means that some of the oil is allowed to pass AROUND the filter element and go directly into the motor as-is. Gasp.

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
>>>when i looked up the 2009 by K&N, the car application chart had all fords, no lotus, no lexus, and no toyota. I wanted to make sure this is the proper filter because I am about to go get one for my car. Please let me know!! If the 2009 by K&N is the right one, please let me know!!!!<<<

ANY 3/4-16 thread oil filter with a comparable diamenter o-ring will go onto our cars. They should have an antidrainback valve and a high RPM engine orientation which means that things like the canister and element strength, the bypass and so forth are up to snuff. There is plenty of space for a larger diameter / taller cases with no clearance issues or complications at all.

The K&N HP 2009 works and fits just fine on our cars. So do some other filters such as certain OE Lexus, BMW, Porsche and others. For example my M3's Mahle filters work just fine on the car and are of very high quality.
 

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Stan said:
>>>when i looked up the 2009 by K&N, the car application chart had all fords, no lotus, no lexus, and no toyota. I wanted to make sure this is the proper filter because I am about to go get one for my car. Please let me know!! If the 2009 by K&N is the right one, please let me know!!!!<<<

ANY 3/4-16 thread oil filter with a comparable diamenter o-ring will go onto our cars. They should have an antidrainback valve and a high RPM engine orientation which means that things like the canister and element strength, the bypass and so forth are up to snuff. There is plenty of space for a larger diameter / taller cases with no clearance issues or complications at all.

The K&N HP 2009 works and fits just fine on our cars. So do some other filters such as certain OE Lexus, BMW, Porsche and others. For example my M3's Mahle filters work just fine on the car and are of very high quality.

Thanks... Im not up on my filter design so Im glad to have someone to ask!

Ill go and get the k&n model.

Im thinking about using mobile synth 10/40 in the car. Any thoughts about that? We have weather in the 40's consistantly with little 80+ temps foreseen in the next month or two.

I used to use 15/50 synth in my e30 m3, the car ran so smooth with it, considering it but my comute to work is 15 miles, take 10+ miles to get the car warmed up, Im afraid the car wont get fully warm on my drives to work. Any thoughts? Considering this oil also.
 

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Adam P said:
I'm thinking about using mobile synth 10/40 in the car. Any thoughts about that?
Mobil also makes a 5W40 oil as recommended by Lotus. Mobil markets it as Mobil 1 Truck & SUV 5-40 , but it's Mobil's fully synthetic oil in the proper weight.
 

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Filter magnets

Regarding the filter blow-by issue, I thought this might be interesting.

I've used an external strap containing magnets on the filter body and it seems to help. The bottom line on this kind of mod is that it couldn't hurt and seems to hold up to the common-sense test. The link is from JC Whitney, but this item can be sourced from various suppliers.

This may be useful for those wanting to stay with the stock filter, yet were concerned about the bypass valve issue.

Oil filter magnet strap
 

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Goose said:
I've used an external strap containing magnets on the filter body and it seems to help. The bottom line on this kind of mod is that it couldn't hurt and seems to hold up to the common-sense test.
Unfortunately, it's mostly snake oil. Most of the metal that may accumulate in an engine is non-metallic (bearing material), and the magnet on the filter of the drain plug will do absolutely no good. Besides, and metal particles large enough to do damage to your engine should be trapped by the oil filter itself. If you do have iron and steel bits floating around in your engine that can get through the oil filter, you have some major problems, and a little magnet isn't going to help at all.

But as you said, it doesn't hurt at all (unlike other snake oil), and if it gives you some extra piece of mind, go for it.
 

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Goose said:
I've used an external strap containing magnets on the filter body and it seems to help. The bottom line on this kind of mod is that it couldn't hurt and seems to hold up to the common-sense test.
Isn't the filter housing metal as well?

If it is, it would do a good job of "shielding" the interior from external magnets. It would be easy enough to test -- strip the can off an old filter, put your magnet band around it, and see how much particle attraction is inside the hollow can -- throw some iron dust or steel nuts in there or something..

I would guess the actual magnetic hold is pretty weak, especially when you consider the oil flow and how much of it is not right up against the can wall.
 

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The K&N filter I received had - get this - small (~0.5mm) loose flakes and beads of metal around the mouth of the filter between the input holes and the metal ring that holds the rubber o-ring.

I picked them all out with a toothpick ... and they would have been sucked into the filter and held in there anyway... but ... but ... sheeze. WTH huh?

-dom
 
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