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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am torn between a 2013 Evora S (IPS) or a 2014 cayman S. I found the Evora about 400 miles away so I haven’t been able to drive it (or any Evora for that matter). I drove the cayman as is is local (and there are a lot out there) and it was super fun. I like the look of the Evora way better. It is easier to find a Porsche certified repair shop in my area. I also think it will hold its value a bit better but that isn’t the deciding factor. I understand this is a Lotus forum but has anyone driven the Evora S IPS and a Cayman S? If so, any thoughts? Also, have used Evoras gone up a lot since COVID? Seems like the toy/extra car market has been going up but I have only been looking for about 6 weeks. They are both currently around the same price. I am looking for a fun weekend driver around town. No track. Thank you
 

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Sorry, you will get a bias answer in this forum. I choose Lotus (owned Elise, now Exige and Evora S) over Porches because you don't see them on the road. I see Porches every day and they just don't have that exotic look and feel. Whenever I climb into the Lotus, I feel it's a special car made for the driver and you are more connected with the road. If you like attentions and unique, then the Evora for sure. How many times have you seen an Evora on the road?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you. Part of the problem is I haven’t seen one recently, haven’t driven one, and don’t have a local lotus dealer. However, I love the look of the Evora.
 

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You need to drive the Evora S first to make any kind of proper decision. Driving your options before you decide is everything when you’re buying a car purely for... driving.

You also need to drive the Evora S first if for no other reason than you describing a Cayman S as super fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I completely agree. Because there aren’t any Evora’s near me, I am trying to make as close to a final decision as possible. If it’s an Evora then I will go and drive whichever one I’m looking to buy. It isn’t the best way but there aren’t a lot of them on the market and there is nothing in the DC metro area that I have seen.
 

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Thank you. Part of the problem is I haven’t seen one recently, haven’t driven one, and don’t have a local lotus dealer. However, I love the look of the Evora.
I sometime go to my garage just to look at my Evora and I'm pretty sure you will do the same when you own one. After 7 years of ownership I still love the look of the Evora. I agreed with Boost, you should test drive to be sure.
 

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You can't go wrong with either car. I have driven both on back roads in our local hills in Sonoma and Napa counties. Both are very capable in the twisties.

The Cayman S is very capable and does everything well. Nice interior space and trunk space. It has no bad habits that I could find and the ride is firm and well controlled. There just isn't much road feel even though the ride is so firm. I'm not sure but it seemed like the shocks had too much bump damping. It can be harsh on poor asphalt, much like my Elise with the track pack shocks set on softer settings. Engine makes lots of torque and pulls like a train. The auto-box keeps the engine on the torque curve well. Manual shifting of the auto box is fairly good, but it's not like a manual. On the interstates and faster B roads it will fly. I liked the throaty roar in the upper rev band. German competence and efficiency at its best.

I think the interior is finished well in the S with good materials. My only complaints with the car was the tire/road noise and the heavier steering that made the front tires feel very distant, particularly when driving briskly through uphill on mountain roads. Rough asphalt makes the front skitter wide as the back end tries to keep up. Get too enthusiastic and the front end just pushes with more understeer. Breathe the throttle and the front tucks back in line. I was looking to buy the Cayman at the time, but after an hour in it I felt it was a very long way away from the tactile feel of the older 911s I've driven.

I did a PPI on an Evora S for the daughter of a good friend who lives back east. She bought the car, had it shipped home. I took it on the same roads that I tested the Cayman the week before. The Evora simply feels more connected to the driver. If you push the car the steering communicates much more through your fingertips with a much lighter touch even though the overall weights are similar. Road noise seems better isolated, but that may have been a difference in the tires between the two cars. The experience is much more analog with great steering feel and suspension compliance on bumpy roads. It feels more like you are driving the car rather than it taking you for a ride. The combination of shocks and OE tires were really good. The IPS in automatic mode is good, I like the sport mode with the crisper shifts. Using the paddles was nowhere as good as the Cayman, there is simply too much delay from the time you activate the paddle to the time you feel the shift, 1-2 seconds. The Evora has a touch more body roll in the corners but I think it enhances the road feel and warns you well before the tires start to lose grip. The Evora feels much more "tossable" transitioning through multiple corners. There is more personality to driving this car, it rewards a good driver with amazing cornering performance.

Personally, I'd take the drive to test the Evora after you have driven a Cayman S. They are both great sports cars, but very different design philosophies and driving feel. Whichever you choose, you're going to enjoy yourself.
 

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i bought my evora 400 without ever driving it. that said, i had an elise and an exige prior so i had an idea of what to expect. not having a dealer or lotus mechanic in driving distance would make me think twice about buying one, but im not mechanically inclined. that being said, id be more comfortable servicing it than my old 964
 

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Thank you. Part of the problem is I haven’t seen one recently, haven’t driven one, and don’t have a local lotus dealer. However, I love the look of the Evora.
Perhaps you should look for an Indy to service the Lotus. Some shops won't even look or service a Lotus. If you buy new then the nearest Lotus can help with warranty items.
 

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I bought a 987 boxster this spring on a whim as I wanted another convertible for the summer after selling my Elise, so although its the older generation car, I think I can offer a decent comparsion. Saying that stresscraxx above sums up the driving experience perfectly. The Boxster does everything well but feels heavier than the Evora. Yes ingress/egress in the Evora is a slight pain with the sill but you get used to it but saying that the lowness of the Boxster makes it difficult in a different way - then again that just may be cause I'm used to the Evora way.

The IPS is good but it can be a little laggy at times. It's not horrible but it can show its slush box roots. Since it is an intelligent box, I think this can be somewhat taken out by driving hard, as I don't remember it being as laggy and I really have been using it more of a GT over the last year or so, so I think it may have programmed itself to my more relaxed driving style. The last PDK I drove was a 911 (it's been a while) and it was a little crisper, but I would say the Evora paddle feels a little more physcial (which I like). My biggest critism with the IPS is it freewheels in 1st gear in manual - it's only an issue in traffic but it can be annoying when it jerks as it bangs home 1st again when the revs rise again.

I think the Evora build quality is great but I think that say in 50000 more miles a Porsche may look a little less worn. Thats hard to describe as I don't think the Lotus will be worn, it just feels like the Porsche is tougher. I sold my Elise when it was 11 with ~35000 miles and the Boxster is 12 with 72000 with 3 owners and it defintely is in better shape than the Elise and my Elise was mine from new and in good condition for an Elise. That shouldn't matter but something to keep in mind. The other thing is storage. The Evoras boot is narrow but long and surprisingly practical for long stuff like golf clubs which won't go in the Porsche. The Porsche has a lot of little cubbies and the frunk is great whereas the Evora doesn't have much cabin storage. Saying that the Evora claws it back with the back seat - while not very useful as a seat it easily hold two large carryons with room to spare. It's amazing how much stuff you can get in one.

Mine has been completely relaible for the 6 years I've had it other than I'm currently replacing my second ac compressor and the usual quality items like the airbag cover - most of which should have been taken care of under warrenty like mine was. While the mechanicals on an Evora are tightly packed, they are still a lot less buried than on a Cayster. The Toyota drivetrain is extremely reliable and Lotus parts overall are not crazy expensive (relatively speaking) and any decent shop will be able to work on it.

I've been shocked at how much I've fell for my cheap boxster but the Evora is a better drivers car and more fun, more exotic etc and I still love it - the only thing I'd change it for is a GT. I think used Caysters are an amazing deal for the money but so is the Evora, it's just over looked and a bit pricier. Both cars are excellent and you won't go wrong but the Lotus will offer a (relatively) better driving experience and is that bit more special as it's extremely rare and more exotic looking.
 
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Your Lotus will spend less time in the shop and you won't get raped when you go to service it. All Porsche should come with free Vasoline for life...

Hope that's considered an opinion..hehe
 

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Your Lotus will spend less time in the shop and you won't get raped when you go to service it. All Porsche should come with free Vasoline for life...

Hope that's considered an opinion..hehe
They need to pass out AnalLube not just Vasoline, when the strut towers break and they fight you to not warranty them is when it hurts.
 

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Technically I did test drive my Evora S ~15 minutes before buying it, but I had already done all the research and paperwork before showing up on delivery day.

I found certain journalist reviews (and some owners here too) to be more credible and relevant over the years than others. I tried to use their points of reference I understood when comparing to the Evora (that is to other vehicles I knew well), and eventually decided it was the right car. Perhaps light, good power, and connected feel were all I mostly needed to know, but I was convinced by those "reference" opinions. And it's just beautiful to look at. 😉
 

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I loved my evora S (2014) and miss the heck out of it. Not to discourage you but, seriously, if you want one, go into it with your eyes wide open. 400 mile drive to go test drive sort of demands you carefully assess whether you can live with certain things. As you have seen here, some people have years and years of completely painless experience. Some don't. The 9-10 months I spent with my 2014 S was a continuous saga of minor-to-major problems (yet, as I will state below... I was almost about to buy another until Covid tanked parts of the market).

Lemons do exist but consider, when you hear reports of problems with these, you're hearing of 1 in 500 vs 1 in 10,000+ compared to the likes of Porsche etc.

I had 3 Cayman S's (987.1, 981, and 718). They were all as near to bullet-proof as anything I've ever owned in this or standard "luxury car" segment. Like with any dealer, Porsche dealers will rape as bad as any and there are situations where you're over a barrel with them as much as anyone. I think that's a wash because for some things (especially through an independent shop) the Cayman can often win cost-wise. For example, engine-out work... it's easier to drop the engine in a Cayman. I know you're interested in IPS, not manual, so I won't go into clutch job (easily double what you'd pay on a Cayman). 911's are slightly different situation, but since you're talking about a Cayman, we needn't go there...

Similarly, on the Evora, while some parts are not "too bad" cost-wise (and actually available), some things are both hard to get and cost twice what you'd pay for the same in a Cayman. Things like a door window regulator... easily double (or more) compared to a Cayman OEM (and non-OEM options for Evora are fewer). Will you need any of these things? Who knows but statistically... Should it matter? Up to you. Just be honest with yourself about how you feel and will deal with this.

Additionally, the Evora has... quirks, and some examples are quirkier than others. You really must honestly assess whether you can live with a car that sometimes just acts... weird, and you have to actually think about... "things" on a level you would never think about on any standard production car like a modern Cayman.

Anyway... it's not all negative; the experience of the Evora is unmatched by anything in its price range. It's funky, fun, weird, sometimes confusing, but all in mostly all good ways. As a testament to this, despite the money-pit that was my Evora, I was well on the path of buying a newer Evora (18+ 400 or GT) until COVID set in and made the already difficult task of selling my most recent car nearly impossible (currently a 2019 C7 Corvette... no one wants one of those right now :p so stuck with it until Lease is up, I imagine).

Just be honest with yourself.
 
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