The Lotus Cars Community banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The context in which people use the word "moot" has always been something that is NOT arguable or debatable...yet the dictionary meaning seems to state the opposite---> something that IS debateable or arguable.

so whats the story here???...Ive always been confused about this since college.



.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,464 Posts
I think that moot means that is not worth discussing until all the information is in.

But this is a moot point since it should be in the Others instead of in the rumors :)
 

·
Forum Founder
Joined
·
29,081 Posts
It is a moo point.

If you know it is off topic, please put the thread in the off topic forum. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
Randy Chase said:
It is a moo point.
As in, say, a point that a cow might make, a bovine point. :)

I hear people mispronounce it all the time, as in "its a mute point." For some reason I find that very funny. A point that can't talk.

I've always used it to mean that while the point may be subject to debate, the outcome is of no consequense. Law students have "Moot Court." they breif and argue up a storm, but in the end its all "moot," nobody real is involved, no one's rights are affected.

In the law, a case become moot when the ruling would have no impact on anything. If for instance someone wants admission to a particular college and brings suit, then decides to go to a different school. Her case becomes moot.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Stan said:
Well this dictionary seems to define the word in the same sense that it is commonly used:

http://www.hyperdictionary.com/dictionary/moot
the definition your link says is "open to debate"....well, isnt this the opposite with respect to how people use it???...most people seem to use it to describe something that isnt arguable or open to debate anymore...what am I missing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
mact3333 said:
the definition your link says is "open to debate"....well, isnt this the opposite with respect to how people use it???...most people seem to use it to describe something that isnt arguable or open to debate anymore...what am I missing?
It does seem like most people use it in the legal definition of "moot".

Moot in the Legal Dictionary per Hyperdictionary: A moot case or a moot point is one not subject to a judicial determination because it involves an abstract question or a pretended controversy that has not yet actually arisen or has already passed. Mootness usually refers to a court's refusal to consider a case because the issue involved has been resolved prior to the court's decision, leaving nothing that would be affected by the court's decision.

The 'common definition' defines it as "open to debate".

Oh the occasional weirdness of the English language!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
Don't you mean moo?

Joey: All right, Rach. The big question is, "does he like you?" All right? Because if he doesn't like you, this is all a moo point.
Rachel: Huh. A moo point?
Joey: Yeah, it's like a cow's opinion. It just doesn't matter. It's moo.
Rachel: Have I been living with him for too long, or did that all just make sense?

http://www.elisetalk.com/forums/sho...id=3780&perpage=20&highlight=moo&pagenumber=2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
Most common current usage seems to be...

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=moot

adj.
Subject to debate; arguable: a moot question.

Law. Without legal significance, through having been previously decided or settled.
Of no practical importance; irrelevant.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Middle English, meeting, from Old English mt, gemt.]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
mootness n.
Usage Note: The adjective moot is originally a legal term going back to the mid-16th century. It derives from the noun moot, in its sense of a hypothetical case argued as an exercise by law students. Consequently, a moot question is one that is arguable or open to debate. But in the mid-19th century people also began to look at the hypothetical side of moot as its essential meaning, and they started to use the word to mean “of no significance or relevance.” Thus, a moot point, however debatable, is one that has no practical value. A number of critics have objected to this use, but 59 percent of the Usage Panel accepts it in the sentence The nominee himself chastised the White House for failing to do more to support him, but his concerns became moot when a number of Republicans announced that they, too, would oppose the nomination. When using moot one should be sure that the context makes clear which sense is meant.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top