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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Beware of the below individuals who claim to have Lotus parts for sale. They are in England, their ploy is to respond to your want ad for a part. They will then state that they have the part, will ask for your phone number, quote you a part price, and ask that you send funds via Western Union - they may even state that their PayPal is not functioning! In any case, you should avoid dealing with these individuals:

John O'Neil - [email protected]
45 Haddon Road, Blackpool, FY2 9AH, United Kingdom.


Richard Woollaston - [email protected]
United Kingdom

Mark Sullivan - [email protected]
121 Manchester street London UK


Harry Doyle - [email protected]
United Kingdom
 

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apparently, there is alot of fraud in the UK. My bank requires me to call in, inform them, and authorize a charge from any UK vendor. Otherwise, they'
ll automatically decline the CC authorization.
 

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Same Experience

Definitely be careful with any individual transactions in the UK for parts. We posted a "looking for window frame" ad and got the same treatment. They all had the exact part ready to go right away - and pretty cheap too! Just send them the money via telex and of course their Paypal was down "for the moment". My response to anyone who says "send me the money and I'll send you the part" is "send me the part and I'll send you the money". That ends it right here every time. Some of the guys who contacted me did so several times - their texts were correct English syntax, etc. A bit of a higher quality scam as compared to various Nigerian Princes and high ranking Generals that I have dealt with...

:D
 

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The Nigerians have compromised the British banking system now. The frauds no longer seem to originate there but that is probably where they are from. One way to try to see if the offer is real is to have them send you some pictures and then ask for a different angle. If they took the picture off of someone's site it will be difficult for them to comply with different photos. Always use a credit card so if the deal "goes south" you have some recourse. The old addage still applies, if the deal seems too good to be true it probably is!
David Teitelbaum
 

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The Nigerians have compromised the British banking system now. The frauds no longer seem to originate there but that is probably where they are from. One way to try to see if the offer is real is to have them send you some pictures and then ask for a different angle. If they took the picture off of someone's site it will be difficult for them to comply with different photos. Always use a credit card so if the deal "goes south" you have some recourse. The old addage still applies, if the deal seems too good to be true it probably is!
David Teitelbaum
Hi Not trying to be picky but I think it is important for people to understand what is compromised and what isn't so they can recognise the scams. No banking system have been compromised. Western Union is the vehicle for the money transaction and is still a red flag for any transaction. The reason they are using English addresses is because whilst most Americans recognise their phone area codes that redirect overseas, very few know that +44 070 is the English equivalent. If you dial an English number starting with that code you are probably talking to someone in Nigeria.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've managed to get the alleged phone numbers for three:

O'Neil = 44 702 406 7342
Woollaston = 44 702 403 1896
Sullivan = 44 702 405 3292
 

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With all the scams and problems coming out of Nigeria, the world should just cut all phone and bank connections to Nigeria. Let us see if the nation could actually survive on the fruit of it's own (real) labor. It seems like half that nation's Gross Domestic Product GDP is from overseas scams. Global connection to the internet is a good thing for most the world; there are clearly a few exceptions. I can't remember the last time I actually saw a "made in nigeria" stamp on any product.
 

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Hi Not trying to be picky but I think it is important for people to understand what is compromised and what isn't so they can recognise the scams. No banking system have been compromised. Western Union is the vehicle for the money transaction and is still a red flag for any transaction. The reason they are using English addresses is because whilst most Americans recognise their phone area codes that redirect overseas, very few know that +44 070 is the English equivalent. If you dial an English number starting with that code you are probably talking to someone in Nigeria.
070 in the UK - +44 70 from outside the UK ;)

I've managed to get the alleged phone numbers for three:

O'Neil = 44 702 406 7342
Woollaston = 44 702 403 1896
Sullivan = 44 702 405 3292
As Ian says - those are "virtual" phone numbers that simply redirect to another number anywhere in the world.
 

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Domestic scam

Similar scam - but different mo. US perps, for change.
If you list anything for sale:
They will contact you and agree to the asking price claiming they will arrange for their own shipment.
Next, they request your name,address and phone number.
They will FedEx overnight registered, lock and key envelope (to make it looking important and legit).
They pay over $50 for that mailing. You look at it and say, "geezzz, if it were a scam "They" would never spend 50 bucks". It is a clever mind f**ing trick to fool most unbelivers.
Inside will be a fake (but very real looking) check, payable by some US municipality for the amount WAAAAY over your asking price. They'll ask you to cash it out and send them the "difference".
USUALLY, the check will go trough the first time, but it will bounce 3 days later. You'll be charged NSF charges AND, if you draw against it, you're liable for that amount.
If someone finds out that you passed a bogus check (even if you did not know it is fake!!!), you are liable criminally for a mail fraud,counterfeiting,etc,etc.
You're TOAST!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Similar scam - but different mo. US perps, for change.
If you list anything for sale:
They will contact you and agree to the asking price claiming they will arrange for their own shipment.
Next, they request your name,address and phone number.
They will FedEx overnight registered, lock and key envelope (to make it looking important and legit).
They pay over $50 for that mailing. You look at it and say, "geezzz, if it were a scam "They" would never spend 50 bucks". It is a clever mind f**ing trick to fool most unbelivers.
Inside will be a fake (but very real looking) check, payable by some US municipality for the amount WAAAAY over your asking price. They'll ask you to cash it out and send them the "difference".
USUALLY, the check will go trough the first time, but it will bounce 3 days later. You'll be charged NSF charges AND, if you draw against it, you're liable for that amount.
If someone finds out that you passed a bogus check (even if you did not know it is fake!!!), you are liable criminally for a mail fraud,counterfeiting,etc,etc.
You're TOAST!
Yeah that scam is quite common on ebay! Having spent 30 years in the banking business, anything involving checks is always suspect - even certified funds! Always allow at least 10 working days for checks to clear.:thwack:
 
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