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I'm still curious what would account for the Emira to be cheaper to produce than the Evora. I mean, specifically what components that added to Evora cost were omitted on the Emira or replaced with cheaper parts? Or did Evora just have a much higher profit margin? I'm having trouble justifying the idea of a car with the same drivetrain costing 32% less, unless those little back seats used cash for padding.
 

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Maybe because Lotus is now owned by a Chinese company.
Production hasn't moved to China, so there's no big savings on labor costs. The Emira and Evora both have aluminum bonded chassis, same powertrain. Are you suggesting that the Evora included 32% of profit that the new owners are happy to return to buyers in favor of gaining market share? Because... China?
 

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Let me speculate a bit based on my experience. Volume discounts on parts between 2k units a year to 20k or more a year (which Geely far exceeds) can easily exceed 20%. Automation compared to hand building everything (which Lotus was doing) saves a huge amount. Lotus volumes were so low that it wouldn't be surprising if fixed costs (building, r&d, admin, etc) were 30% per unit - and if volume triples (from 1600 to 4800) then per unit fixed costs becomes 1/3 and drops to 10% - a 20% per unit cost savings just from that! When you add those together, they can easily save per unit costs of 32% you're talking about without moving production anywhere.
Thanks for actually trying to answer the question! Volume discounts on parts would definitely apply to shared parts across Geely models, but things like body panels won't see that savings. How many parts are shared? Neither will there be a significant savings on the powertrain unless Toyota just decides to sell them cheaper because... uh, China? Labor automation definitely helps after the initial investment. Fixed costs should help as number of units goes up.

Don't get me wrong, I love the Emira's styling and can't wait to get mine, but I just don't see how the math works that a car with the same basic structure and powertrain as the Evora would somehow come out 1/3 cheaper, unless the Evora's price was padded with tons of profit margin, which it doesn't seem like it was.
 

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ha, you seriously just 'technically" that guy over a 1k difference in MSRP because of the year change...Glad to have you as a new member to the lotus community..
The point you missed is that while technically you can buy a base model C8 for $61k in 2021, almost none actually exist. The actual average sales price is $85k as kratedisease mentioned. If someone is going to use a rare exception to prove the rule, the exception should at least be accurate. Glad to be here.
 
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