The Lotus Cars Community banner

MSRP (USD)

  • Below 75k

    Votes: 2 5.0%
  • 75000 to 79999

    Votes: 4 10.0%
  • 80000 to 84999

    Votes: 10 25.0%
  • 85000 to 89999

    Votes: 13 32.5%
  • 90000 to 94999

    Votes: 6 15.0%
  • 95000 to 99999

    Votes: 3 7.5%
  • 100000 to 104999

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 105k +

    Votes: 2 5.0%
141 - 160 of 249 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
It would be great for Lotus if that happens. The Emira suddenly becomes a bargain. I think below 90k is a bargain for the v6 supercharged manual Emira. A10+ year old Exige 240/260 are in the 70-80k and a 25+ year old Elise are in the 40s. The sport car market is insane this year. Same goes for the housing market.
Exige/Elise are different experiences and will hold those values, but the Evora....yeah, they going to see a price hit with the Emira coming out.
 

·
Registered
2022 Lotus Emira
Joined
·
606 Posts
Is the tour confirmed for the USA ?

Any details ? Which locations ?

Anything, anything ? Bueller ? Bueller ?
Here's an excerpt I received directly from Lotus, with information available to everyone:
[...] pay a deposit to reserve an early build slot of the car, which will be on tour in The US from November 2021 and in dealerships from July 2022, [...]

Full pricing for the car and specifications will be available from September 2021.
That's the official word and the best we have today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
Can you explain why exclusivity is so important to you? I struggle with this aspect. Would it really be a deal breaker if Lotus sells a huge number of these and they are more common than the previous version? Personally I don't care about that at all, in fact if it's as good as they claim, I would love it if everyone could afford and drive one. Won't change how I feel about it or how the car makes me feel.
It’s not as important has having a well balance/handling sport car. But it’s nice to drive an exotic that is hand built, not just another common sport car on the road. I like to see other people turn their head to admire my car and take pictures. You will have a better understanding once you owned a Lotus. All the other cars, doesn’t give you this special feeling unless it’s over 200K.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,294 Posts
I don't care if I can get a Z0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000006 for free. Not interested. Not what this thread is about so stop stroking about it. There is another thread for that visual nightmare. I stared at back of one last Sat for 15 minutes trying to "get it"...Nope
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,294 Posts
It’s not as important has having a well balance/handling sport car. But it’s nice to drive an exotic that is hand built, not just another common sport car on the road. I like to see other people turn their head to admire my car and take pictures. You will have a better understanding once you owned a Lotus. All the other cars, doesn’t give you this special feeling unless it’s over 200K.
Thank you for mirroring my thoughts. Nothing else drives like a Lotus............unless you pour out $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ or its a race car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
Exige/Elise are different experiences and will hold those values, but the Evora....yeah, they going to see a price hit with the Emira coming out.
You may be right if the owners start selling/trading in their Evora for the Emira. But in the long run, the Evora price will appreciate. I understand the driving dynamic of my Evora S and Exige; therefore, I continue to drive them and I'm keeping for my kids. We had shared so many experiences and created a family bond with our Lotus. I'm planning on buying the Emira (the performance version, not this 1st edition). Once you owned a Lotus, it's hard to let it go. My kids are very fortunate to experience Newton's law of motions at a very young age.
 

·
Registered
2022 Lotus Emira
Joined
·
606 Posts
Can you explain why exclusivity is so important to you? I struggle with this aspect. Would it really be a deal breaker if Lotus sells a huge number of these and they are more common than the previous version? Personally I don't care about that at all, in fact if it's as good as they claim, I would love it if everyone could afford and drive one. Won't change how I feel about it or how the car makes me feel.
No, it wouldn't be a deal breaker if they sell more cars, because the previous cars barely sold. However, if they work overtime and build every car that is demanded (today), there will be no demand for the car tomorrow. So this means different things to different types of buyers:

Value buyer:
These people will typically shop Porsche, Ferrari, Lamborghini and other brands that tend to maintain value (at least on paper) relative to the overall market. This doesn't mean the cars won't depreciate, it just means they don't depreciate at the same rate as the average car.

For example, on average, cars depreciate around 20% first year and 50% within 5-years. Now imagine you're buying a Lamborghini for $250-300k, you certainly expect depreciation, but you don't expect the car to be worth $125-150k after 5-years. A more realistic number would be $175-200k. So nominally it's still a huge loss (especially when you factor in maintenance, insurance, taxes and so on), but on a percentage basis you're doing better than the rest of the market.

This matters to people in every bracket, despite what people think of supercar buyers, everyone is value conscious ;)

The primary market needs to maintain a certain equilibrium to make sure the secondary market doesn't drop out - this is the mistake McLaren made by not limiting production on paper. They said they'll build as many as they can (and despite still building an incredibly small numbers), they lost tons of sales. Which leads us to....

Exclusive buyer:
Some buyers want a product which doesn't look like the rest. There are millions of drivers on the road who have a Toyota Camry, don't care much about cars, car culture, perception and so on. But there are others who want something different and are willing to pay for it. For some people this may be modifications to a car: wheels, exhaust, lighting, bodykit, whatever. It's our desire to be different and stand out.

This again comes at multiple brackets. That's why car companies put out special cars, to attract those buyers. A BMW 3-series is a 'standard BMW'.... so if you're an enthusiast you want the M3. The 911 is for rich plebs, we want the GT3... or maybe the GT3 RS? Etc. You get the point.

Answer:
So now to answer your question, why is it important to me? I live in an affluent community where having/seeing supercars is pretty normal. Everyone and their mother owns a BMW, Porsche, Tesla, Maserati, Aston, Bentley, RR and other relatively upscale cars. To be honest, I'm just numb to them and want something different and special. Special doesn't always have to be expensive, but it has to be relatively uncommon and give a sense of occasion.

I'm also a value buyer, as are most, I'd think. Nobody wants to lose 40% of the cars value in the same time other cars lose 20%. It doesn't matter what the nominal amount is, the relative percentage is what matters. I'd rather lose 20% of a $250k car than 40% of a $100k car. It's nominally more money ($50k vs $40k), but relatively speaking one is a better investment. For only a marginally higher loss you got to enjoy a substantially more expensive toy.

Just remember, it doesn't matter which cars or price brackets we're talking about, the same psychology and desires exist. That's why there's a Civic and a Civic Si and a Civic Type R and so on.

Sorry for the long response, but hopefully it makes sense :)
 

·
Registered
2005 Lotus Elise -- Ardent Red
Joined
·
51 Posts
Folks, any British sports car puts you into a special group. Just an extended family of sorts.
A family of no family perhaps. Here in the mid-west, I can go a year without seeing another. Which is probably why my Elise draws so much attention at a restaurant or gas station. (Still haven't taken it to a cars & coffee yet.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
No, it wouldn't be a deal breaker if they sell more cars, because the previous cars barely sold. However, if they work overtime and build every car that is demanded (today), there will be no demand for the car tomorrow. So this means different things to different types of buyers:

Value buyer:
These people will typically shop Porsche, Ferrari, Lamborghini and other brands that tend to maintain value (at least on paper) relative to the overall market. This doesn't mean the cars won't depreciate, it just means they don't depreciate at the same rate as the average car.

For example, on average, cars depreciate around 20% first year and 50% within 5-years. Now imagine you're buying a Lamborghini for $250-300k, you certainly expect depreciation, but you don't expect the car to be worth $125-150k after 5-years. A more realistic number would be $175-200k. So nominally it's still a huge loss (especially when you factor in maintenance, insurance, taxes and so on), but on a percentage basis you're doing better than the rest of the market.

This matters to people in every bracket, despite what people think of supercar buyers, everyone is value conscious ;)

The primary market needs to maintain a certain equilibrium to make sure the secondary market doesn't drop out - this is the mistake McLaren made by not limiting production on paper. They said they'll build as many as they can (and despite still building an incredibly small numbers), they lost tons of sales. Which leads us to....

Exclusive buyer:
Some buyers want a product which doesn't look like the rest. There are millions of drivers on the road who have a Toyota Camry, don't care much about cars, car culture, perception and so on. But there are others who want something different and are willing to pay for it. For some people this may be modifications to a car: wheels, exhaust, lighting, bodykit, whatever. It's our desire to be different and stand out.

This again comes at multiple brackets. That's why car companies put out special cars, to attract those buyers. A BMW 3-series is a 'standard BMW'.... so if you're an enthusiast you want the M3. The 911 is for rich plebs, we want the GT3... or maybe the GT3 RS? Etc. You get the point.

Answer:
So now to answer your question, why is it important to me? I live in an affluent community where having/seeing supercars is pretty normal. Everyone and their mother owns a BMW, Porsche, Tesla, Maserati, Aston, Bentley, RR and other relatively upscale cars. To be honest, I'm just numb to them and want something different and special. Special doesn't always have to be expensive, but it has to be relatively uncommon and give a sense of occasion.

I'm also a value buyer, as are most, I'd think. Nobody wants to lose 40% of the cars value in the same time other cars lose 20%. It doesn't matter what the nominal amount is, the relative percentage is what matters. I'd rather lose 20% of a $250k car than 40% of a $100k car. It's nominally more money ($50k vs $40k), but relatively speaking one is a better investment. For only a marginally higher loss you got to enjoy a substantially more expensive toy.

Just remember, it doesn't matter which cars or price brackets we're talking about, the same psychology and desires exist. That's why there's a Civic and a Civic Si and a Civic Type R and so on.

Sorry for the long response, but hopefully it makes sense :)
I enjoyed your response and definitely feel we are in the same boat here. The Emira for me is a mix between value and exclusivity. I find joy not seeing everyone drive the same vehicle as me, but always happy to see one or two others out that enjoy the same vehicle as myself. If I wanted to drive what everyone else is, then I would just pick up a Prius and blend in with everyone.

I picked up the Civic Type R back when it first launched. I really enjoyed being one of the few ones on the road for the first two years, and not have a Civic or Si like everyone else. Fast forward to today, and there's more Type Rs on the road and I'm no longer the only one. That's not a bad thing as the community continues to grow and we see Honda reinvest on the next gen again. My feeling is that will happen with the Emira as the production years grow. Exclusivity doesn't mean you're the only one with it, but part of a small group that has one. Now if the Emira was as common as a Prius, I would probably pass and look for a different vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
No, it wouldn't be a deal breaker if they sell more cars, because the previous cars barely sold. However, if they work overtime and build every car that is demanded (today), there will be no demand for the car tomorrow. So this means different things to different types of buyers:

Value buyer:
These people will typically shop Porsche, Ferrari, Lamborghini and other brands that tend to maintain value (at least on paper) relative to the overall market. This doesn't mean the cars won't depreciate, it just means they don't depreciate at the same rate as the average car.

For example, on average, cars depreciate around 20% first year and 50% within 5-years. Now imagine you're buying a Lamborghini for $250-300k, you certainly expect depreciation, but you don't expect the car to be worth $125-150k after 5-years. A more realistic number would be $175-200k. So nominally it's still a huge loss (especially when you factor in maintenance, insurance, taxes and so on), but on a percentage basis you're doing better than the rest of the market.

This matters to people in every bracket, despite what people think of supercar buyers, everyone is value conscious ;)

The primary market needs to maintain a certain equilibrium to make sure the secondary market doesn't drop out - this is the mistake McLaren made by not limiting production on paper. They said they'll build as many as they can (and despite still building an incredibly small numbers), they lost tons of sales. Which leads us to....

Exclusive buyer:
Some buyers want a product which doesn't look like the rest. There are millions of drivers on the road who have a Toyota Camry, don't care much about cars, car culture, perception and so on. But there are others who want something different and are willing to pay for it. For some people this may be modifications to a car: wheels, exhaust, lighting, bodykit, whatever. It's our desire to be different and stand out.

This again comes at multiple brackets. That's why car companies put out special cars, to attract those buyers. A BMW 3-series is a 'standard BMW'.... so if you're an enthusiast you want the M3. The 911 is for rich plebs, we want the GT3... or maybe the GT3 RS? Etc. You get the point.

Answer:
So now to answer your question, why is it important to me? I live in an affluent community where having/seeing supercars is pretty normal. Everyone and their mother owns a BMW, Porsche, Tesla, Maserati, Aston, Bentley, RR and other relatively upscale cars. To be honest, I'm just numb to them and want something different and special. Special doesn't always have to be expensive, but it has to be relatively uncommon and give a sense of occasion.

I'm also a value buyer, as are most, I'd think. Nobody wants to lose 40% of the cars value in the same time other cars lose 20%. It doesn't matter what the nominal amount is, the relative percentage is what matters. I'd rather lose 20% of a $250k car than 40% of a $100k car. It's nominally more money ($50k vs $40k), but relatively speaking one is a better investment. For only a marginally higher loss you got to enjoy a substantially more expensive toy.

Just remember, it doesn't matter which cars or price brackets we're talking about, the same psychology and desires exist. That's why there's a Civic and a Civic Si and a Civic Type R and so on.

Sorry for the long response, but hopefully it makes sense :)
Interesting, so from the list above you are saying exclusivity to you is, resale value, unique in your hood, and something that is a higher performance version.

We live very different lives, I'm a working class man, live in a regular middle-class neighbourhood, the sportiest car on my street which is only about 20 homes, is likely a previous generation Buick Lacrosse Turbo. That's excluding my current vehicle which is a 2020 VW GTI, which I bought as a "bridge vehicle" to save up for something special in 3 years time. At my government job the sportiest vehicles are a Mustang GT, Audi S4, and Merc GLA AMG. So as you can see, even though I am not attempting to be exclusive, buying anything like a Lotus (Heck a Porsche, Vette, Jag, etc) will stick out like a sore thumb. If anything I worry that buying one will cause others to resent me. Also, I think in my limited population province in Canada there might be 10 Lotus in total, so it's incredibly rare.

Moral of the story, you really want to feel exclusivity, move to a boring part of the world and buy the least practical car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
@Johnnymac GTI gang! 😎

IMO, my GTI is one of the nicest cars in my neighborhood (along with my wife's MK7 GLI). That being said, I can't wait to stay right where I am in my modest, yet safe, and friendly neighborhood and keep my perfect daily driver GTI (which I can continue to tinker with and thrash on here and there) while also having the beautiful Emira for weekend cruises, date nights, car shows, and track days with my car buddies.

Anyway, back on topic of guessing the base price...

Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Plant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,094 Posts
I4 = 72 995$
V6 = 82 500$

Evora GT in UK = 88K
Evora GT in USA = 98K
Emira price annonced by Lotus in UK = 60K
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,179 Posts
All these confirmation numbers going out right now may mean they're getting ready to release the rest of the car specs. Next week maybe? I seem to recall somewhere that somebody thought September 7 was going to be the date?
 
141 - 160 of 249 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top