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The most convenient (and least expensive) station to my house is a Swifty station, where they have a 93 octane premium fuel. The manager claims it's a quality gasoline with all the usual detergents.
Any risk in not using the fuels from the bigger oil companies?

Also, it is very difficult to find stations in Illinois that have ethinol free fuel. I realize that we can use alcohol fuels in the Elise, but is there any advantage to search out those rare stations around here that still have alcohol free gas?

Thanks.
 

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they all get fuel from the same places. the big issue is that enough people go to the station that the gas turns over often and doesn't just sit there forever. As long as it's relatively fresh you're good to go.
 

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The owners manual states that fuels with alcohol or methanol should *not* be used; ethanol is an acceptable additive.
 

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MattG said:
The owners manual states that fuels with alcohol or methanol should *not* be used; ethanol is an acceptable additive.
That doesn't make any sense. Ethanol IS an alcohol.
 

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Methanol is more corrosive than Ethanol.

iowa has less ethanol snuck into the premium grades, so typically you only see 91 octane.
Any 93 you see tends to be heavy on the MBTE content.
I avoid any alcohol if I possibly can as I normally drive older German machines which have seals that are not tolerant of ethanol blends.
m
 

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There have been some reports about corroded fuel tanks of the S1 Elise.
Alcohols contain less energy “ normal “ fuel distillates => lower mileage.

But when used for octane boosting only – I think the percentage is too small that it really matters.

Ruediger

BTW
Thegit, do you have your Elise already ? I am asking because I am curious about the Accusump you wanted to install. Please let us know as soon as you have got some experiences.
 

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As much a I detest Ethanol and it's marketing, I'm pretty sure you'll be ok as the car is new and won't have the varnish and deposits left by years of dirty fuel nozzle insertion and various interactive fuel formulations in your tank.
So there (as a new car) should be nothing in the tank for the *stripper* qualities of ETOH to shove downstream.
I'd be 100% sure if it was a new German(no offense) or Asian( no offense intended) machine, Just a little reservation for the British( no offense intended) source of the machine :cool:
A friend of mine made a living converting early to early 80's Porsche 911 to webbers after ethanol was introduced.

I would avoid frequent and often repeated applications of any fuel system/injector cleaners though, regarless of brand and reputation. Once every six months is more than enough if a large chain fuel dispenser is frequented.
The smaller ones are prone to foreign matter(dirt/water) contamination due to older tanks and being under the radar of the EPA for longer periods.
AND I'm still waiting.......
m
 

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'The Car Doctor' (Ron Ananian) has
stated numerous times on his WOR-710
radio program (Sundays 10 A.M.- 12 Noon) that the best gas additive to
stop carbon deposits from forming is
Techron by Chevron. He is a working
shop owner when not on radio and
claims he sees the 'no carbon buildup'
on many of his customers cars that have
used the product for years. He says using
it every six months is enough. It should
be noted that Chevron now includes the
Techron additive in their gasoline. I don't
have access to a Chevron station so I will
use the additive every six months.
 

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A good time to use things like techron is shortly before an oil change. Like a few days or a week. That way any solvent or additive that winds up getting mixed in with the oil is flushed out after it's job is done. The oil gets contaminated with the additive when the car is operated...blowby and so forth. This is what BMW suggests...they worked with Chevron in developing Techron.
 

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Most major brand gasoline retailors are pretty proud of their additive package. I am sure they would be happy to tell you what is in them if you look on their website or write them a letter asking about it.

There was a comment earlier about all the gasoline coming from the same place. While that is correct, the additive package is not usually added until the gasoline is in the delivery truck. Each brand will typically have their own additive package. In some cases, different octanes of the same brand will have different additive packages. Note that some ads tout the cleaning capabilities of the premium gasoline. There is a law working its way through congress that will require all grades to have the same additives.
 

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I posted this in a different thread about engine stalls but it seems more appropriate here.

I contacted Chevron about why I can only find 91 octane in California and this was their response. Seems there's a pipeline supplier to 'western states' that limits the anti knock index (octane) in their gas to only 91.

-----------------------
Dominic,

Your inquiry was forwarded to us here at ChevronTexaco Fuels Technical Service.

We are sorry to say Chevron does not market 93 or higher octane gasoline at Chevron stations anywhere in the United States. It is more likely that you will find the octane of 91-93 to be the highest available in most places, even by our competitors. To our knowledge, most all car manuals do not recommend the need for anything higher than 91.

There has been a reduction in the Antiknock Index (AKI) (also commonly known as "octane" - the number posted on the dispenser pumps at the service stations) in the Supreme (Premium) grade of Chevron gasolines. This likely has been the case in most all other brands of premium grade gasolines marketed in California and most of the Western states. This reduction took effect August 1, 2001. At this time we do not know whether non-Chevron 93 or 92-octane gasoline may be available in certain areas of these states.


Chevron converted to 91 octane for Supreme gasoline in response to changing pipeline specifications in these Western states. While Chevron was not in favor of reducing the octane of Supreme, complying with this change allows for the continued efficient and reliable distribution of gasoline to consumers. Specifically, Kinder Morgan Pipeline Company notified Chevron that effective August 2001, minimum octane specifications for Supreme grade gasoline shipped for sale in these states would be 91 octane. Those pipelines are important to Chevron - and we believe to others - in ensuring a reliable supply of gasoline to consumers.

Some UNOCAL station in California sell 100 Octane (AKI) racing unleaded gasoline.

There are specialty racing fuels (with higher octanes) available through independent companies.

For racing fuels, try these resources:

ERC Engine Research Co.
San Lorenzo, CA
(510) 276-9334
Tech Line: (800) 445-1479

Chevron Phillips Chemical Co.
Phillips Racing Fuels
Racing and Reference Fuels website address: http://www.p66race.com/

Telephone (Toll Free)
1-888-P66-RACE
 
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