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Discussion Starter #1
My outside passenger tail light seems to work when it feels like it.

As a blinker it works fine.

Has anyone had any similar problems? I know its still under warranty but who wants to go to the dealer and waste time.

I do live in florida so i think the rain has alot to do with this... just wanted to here others imput.

Thanx
 

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when it's cold, my left rear blinker doesn't blink, the front and side lamps blink real fast.
it goes away shortly after i run down the road 1/2 to 2 miles, usually.
it's not consistant..intermittants are the bane of all of us.
maybe,,,,,,i may,,,,get to look at it later,,,,,,maybe.:)
sam
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Electrical. our worst enemy
 

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i poked around last night, found that i get the fast-blink when the light is disconnected. so, ot's an open that's getting me, not a short circuit.
i re coupled the connectors.
we'll see.
 

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i poked around last night, found that i get the fast-blink when the light is disconnected.
Mechanical flashers (I assume that the Elise uses a mechanical version, but even many electronic flashers emulate the mechanicals "features"), are designed to work that way.

The current passing through the flasher heats a bi-metallic contact and cause it to bend. This opens the circuit. Then the bi-metallic strip cools and closes the contact (the open and closing makes the clicking sounds that we hear). When a bulb is burned out (not in the circuit) it changes the current flow and causes the mechanism to blink faster. Believe it or not, they are designed that way as an indication that a bulb is burned out, but most people are unaware of that.

A burned out bulb/open connection appears a a circuit with less resistance, and causes the blinker to flash faster.
A corroded/poor connection has an opposite affect in that it increases the resistance of the circuit and causes the flasher to blink slower.

So, if you have a slow blinker, you probably have a bad connection or a bad bulb in the side that is slow. Often it is that the bulb is not making a good contact with the housing (corroded) and has a poor ground. The other likely possibility is that you have a bad dual filament bulb. If the ground inside the bulb "goes bad", both filaments have to "light up", increasing the resistance. Actually it increases the resistance a lot - the "power" enters the bulb via the normal connection, passes through the filament, and attempts to pass out the ground. But the ground is no good, so the current "back flows" through the other filament, and out it's connection to the wiring harness to the bulb on the other side, through it's filament, and out that bulb's ground. You don't notice the extra filaments lighting up because their resigned resistance is so high, so the bulbs don't get very bright.

Bottom line is that if you blinkers are blinking at a "funny speed", then pull the bulbs and check them to make sure they are all functioning properly (measure the resistance/continuity with a meter from the contacts to the housing). You can also check the voltages at the various contacts in the light sockets, and check the resistance/continuity to the ground.

Or at least, swap in new bulbs and see if the problem goes away.
 

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refill your blinker fluid.

check pep boys or napa, they never have it on the shelves though... you'll probably have to ask the guy behind the counter for it. :up:
 

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refill your blinker fluid.

check pep boys or napa, they never have it on the shelves though... you'll probably have to ask the guy behind the counter for it. :up:
Ace,

That's just plain wrong.





Napa usually has it right next to the wiper fluid. I've only had to ask once in 2 years ;).
 
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