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...call me a space cowboy
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This I my setup....
Richard, could you mention the brand/model or source?

See jumpman's post above where he links to a post with a similar (same?) scissor lift from Greg Smith Equipment. I seriously considered this style, but had to rule it out for reasons I'll mention below...


Get an an EZCarLift instead. It's 1000x more stable than a Quickjack and much better made (Made in USA, not cheap Chinese junk). Works great with the MWR lift kit.
Nick, I'm curious if you have had a chance to see the Quickjack face to face. If so, I'd be interested in more specific concerns you have about the stability.

I was very seriously considering the EZ car lift a couple years ago, and sought out a local owner who let me visit to see it. I was very impressed with it, it is no doubt a damn fine product. But I did feel it is overpriced, even taking into account the domestic origins. I'm always in favor of buying USA made products when I can (I even started a thread on the subject in another forum) but two grand , shipped, for what is not much more than a couple of weldments seemed a little out of line. If a power unit was included I'd consider the price appropriate.

In any case, I had to rule out the EZ lift and the scissor style lifts because of the condition of my garage floor. These type of lifts have legs that travel across the floor while they hoist, and my floor might cause a loss of stability and might become further damaged by the jack legs. The base of the Quickjack frame doesn't move in use. When I bought the house I intended to have the floor replaced, and the landscaping reworked to improve the poor drainage that caused the problem. If that plan had worked out, I'd have poured footings for a two post lift at the same time as the new floor. But intervening events have forced us to delay those improvements, probably for a couple years, and the Quickjack will work in the garage as it is now.
 

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Can you post a picture of the underside, specifically where the front and rear points are?



Get an an EZCarLift instead. It's 1000x more stable can than a Quickjack and much better made (Made in USA, not cheap Chinese junk). Works great with the MWR lift kit.

 

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Can you post a picture of the underside, specifically where the front and rear points are?
Rear points are the EZCARLIFT "pucks" on the MWR lift point kit, front points are under the doors. Yes they are rear of the marked front lift points, but it's all an aluminum box there. Boytcho (inventor of the EZ car lift) has researched many cars and how to best/safely lift them on the EZ including the Elise. He talked directly to Lotus and they told him it's fine to lift it under the door hinges as the front points. I do have to lift it a bit w/ the Jack Helper at the rear to get it all the way under when rolling under, not really difficult. I roll the EZ car 90% of the way in from the rear, it hits under the front doors, then I lift the rear w/ the Jack Helper about 2 inches and position the EZ.
 

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Nick, I'm curious if you have had a chance to see the Quickjack face to face. If so, I'd be interested in more specific concerns you have about the stability.

I was very seriously considering the EZ car lift a couple years ago, and sought out a local owner who let me visit to see it. I was very impressed with it, it is no doubt a damn fine product. But I did feel it is overpriced, even taking into account the domestic origins. I'm always in favor of buying USA made products when I can (I even started a thread on the subject in another forum) but two grand , shipped, for what is not much more than a couple of weldments seemed a little out of line. If a power unit was included I'd consider the price appropriate.
A friend has a QuickJack, so yes. Its frightening how wobbly it is up there. I would not use it for anything other than changing tires. I couldn't imaging torqueing a high torque bolt while laying under it on the QuickJack. If you look at the original adverts for the Quickjack it was basically made for people to take to the track to swap to track tires and swap back to drive home. I don't believe it was originally designed as a mechanics lift, but they market it as that now.

The EZ "wheels" move very little, maybe 3 inches going up down. I have used it in 2 different garage floors, no problem at all.

EZ is more costly b/c it's very solid construction also b/c it's not made in China. IMO you get what you pay for.

For me I didn't want a two post lift such as Bendpak b/c I'd have to poar footings also it's much cumbersome to store and takes up a wider space than the car if your garage is tight left to right in width. Not saying the EZ car lift is for everyone, but it's been a great choice for me and I have no regrets that I got the EZcarlift vs a 2 post or a Quickjack.
 

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Thanks for your input, Nick.

BTW, I'll definitely be using jack stands in conjunction with the lift. The manual makes it clear that jack stands must be used if working under the vehicle, not that anyone should need to be told that. It does seem that there are many pinch points and ample opportunities for the inattentive/stupid operator to break or chop off an appendage.
 

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The Quickjack arrived yesterday and I spent a couple hours unpacking and assembling it. Overall it's made reasonably well. Weld quality is good and very consistent. Finish is decent, not great. All parts were included except fluid (it uses ATF, which is convenient). Hoses and quick-disconnect fittings are good quality.

From the manual, I expected to have to make 16 threaded hose fitting connections, but was glad to see that they preassemble most of them now. There are only six to do, and they are o-ring or flare fittings, so they don't need tape. In testing, two of the pre-made connections wept a little, so I later unmade them and reassembled with Teflon tape.

Today I filled the tank with 2qts ATF, ran several test cycles, and bled the cylinders. The air precharge cylinders are very small, thus a little tricky to get the pressure just right. I found a bicycle pump worked much better than the shop compressor.

Setting up to lift took awhile, partly because I had the car stored close to the wall, partly was just getting familiar. I was surprised at how quickly it can lift the car, also surprised by how slow it lowers. I used one tall rubber block per corner which worked well and seems very secure. I plan to make some simple setup sticks that will let me get the frames into position quickly without having to measure. When lifting to full height, the car moves laterally between 10 and 11". You can not fine tune the lifting height. There are two positions for the prop rods, full and half height, and the car will gradually sink down until those props lock into place.

I rocked the car around while at full height and I find it to be reasonably secure. What is "reasonably?" It's about what I expected, about halfway between the minimum stability I would accept and the most stable I would realistically hope for. More than "good enough" and less than"rock solid." As stated above this is a jack, not a work lift. It's not intended to be the sole support while working on the car. I plan to customize my jack stands to work in conjunction with this jack.
 

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I got the smallest model, the 3500, which is discontinued; distributors are selling off remaining stock.

Not using lift point adapters, so I have to drop the undertray first. But I have the undertray and diffuser set up with quick-release fasteners so it comes off pretty easily. I have one lifting frame at the two front lift points, and one lifting frame at the two points on the rear frame cross member (the standard rear jack stand points). The two lifting frames are oriented crosswise the the car.

You can download the manual from the ASE site. See the link in post #13.
 

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I got the smallest model, the 3500, which is discontinued; distributors are selling off remaining stock.

Not using lift point adapters, so I have to drop the undertray first. But I have the undertray and diffuser set up with quick-release fasteners so it comes off pretty easily. I have one lifting frame at the two front lift points, and one lifting frame at the two points on the rear frame cross member (the standard rear jack stand points). The two lifting frames are oriented crosswise the the car.

You can download the manual from the ASE site. See the link in post #13.
So what do you think ? Pictures ? I was thing about picking one up before they sell out.
 

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Can't post pictures right now, but really there's nothing I could show that's not clear from the advertising photos. The manual makes it pretty clear what you're getting into, that's what convinced me to try it out. Anyone considering buying one should download the manual.

I'm reasonably happy with it. I definitely wouldn't use it as a work support, but wasn't expecting to be able to. But it is secure enough that I won't worry about stability while doing work that doesn't require getting under the car. For example I wouldn't hesitate to sit in the car and start the motor. See post #27 for more of my thoughts; can't think of anything else to add. I'd be glad to address any specific questions you might have.
 

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Quick jack solution

So I purchased the new Quickjack BL5000 SLX
I used two 4 foot 2inch steel tubes. Placed them on the frame rails of the Quickjack from one side to the other, then used the short rubber blocks at the lift points.
I can place a jack at the rear end and as I push the "up" button on the the Quickjack I can support the rear as the whole car goes up.
I've marked my steel tubes now so i can set it all up quickly.

The whole setup is very sturdy and the Quickjack locks in so that I can work under the car.

Should be good for a wheel change at the track and yes I'll be careful to support the rear as it lifts.
All in all it can be done :)
I'll time the process next time ...
 

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So I purchased the new Quickjack BL5000 SLX
I used two 4 foot 2inch steel tubes. Placed them on the frame rails of the Quickjack from one side to the other, then used the short rubber blocks at the lift points.
I can place a jack at the rear end and as I push the "up" button on the the Quickjack I can support the rear as the whole car goes up.
I've marked my steel tubes now so i can set it all up quickly.

The whole setup is very sturdy and the Quickjack locks in so that I can work under the car.

Should be good for a wheel change at the track and yes I'll be careful to support the rear as it lifts.
All in all it can be done :)
I'll time the process next time ...
Do you have some pictures from under the car?
 

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I'm considering the 5000SLX as well. @ReDRuM, do you have any updates to your report? Does anybody have experience using the QuickJack with the MWR Lift Point Kit? I'd rather not use the transverse jacking approach -I keep a motorcycle in the garage and there is not a lot of room on that axis.

-C
 

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It works well. The hassle factor consists of lining up the car appropriately. I marked the floor so that I can relatively efficiently place the jacks the right distance apart , then also marked the floor for the correct placement of the car. Then placing the steel bars under.
If you lowered the car, drive up onto 2" by 6" planks.
I drilled through the steel bars into the quick jack so that I could drop a flat head nail to "lock" the bars in place.
Be careful backing away from the ramps , once didn't remove the bars , and managed to dislodge one and trap it under the car. I do use a jack at the back to help support the weight of the motor , because without it the jacks will lift from the front otherwise .
I did experiment and weight the front wheels with 25kg plates on each. That helped keep things more stable.
It's quite handy for me being short ... I helps when I need to do some work under the car then I'll drop the car within a minute and work from the top etc.


Sent from my LM-Q910 using Tapatalk
 

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@ReDRuM, thanks for the feedback. I think I'll pull the trigger on the same model you have. But I want to make sure I understand the purpose of your cross bars... from the pictures you posted it appears the rear-most jack point is no further aft than the stock floor-jack point. That means that to balance the car you still need to use the floor jack under the engine. Are the cross bars only used to move the rear jack points a little bit more inboard to line up with the factory front jack points? If so, have you considered the MWR Lift Point Kit instead? My understanding is that they are installed

(1) far enough aft that the floor jack is not required,
(2) far enough inboard to line up with the factory front jack points
(3) low enough that there is no need to remove the belly pan

Thanks for your input!

-Chris
 

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(1) far enough aft that the floor jack is not required,
- I do use a floor jack . I have made a nifty lifty like bar. I don't remove the undertray. I lift at the rear jack points with a jack as a precaution at the same time as pushing the up button on the quick jack. If you remove the rear tires when the car is just off the ground , and/or by weighting the front end you would not need the jack. I like the added security.

(2) far enough inboard to line up with the factory front jack points
- you cannot line up both the front and mid lift points as the quick jack are placed between the front tires and so that's to narrow for the middle lift points . I've just thought though ... Maybe the car can be lifted anywhere between the middle lift points ... Not sure .

(3) low enough that there is no need to remove the belly pan
- yup no need . Once the car is up it's easier to get under and take off the undertray ( after removing the rear wheels +/- weighting down the fronts wheels
You can drive the car up onto wood planks for extra clearance.

Sent from my LM-Q910 using Tapatalk
 

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I don't see what you're saying about the side sills / aluminum frame. The car doesn't rest along the length of the jack. Instead you put rubber blocks (basically glorified hockey pucks) on top of the rails where the lift points for your car are, and the jack rail sits ~2" below the car.

I thought about getting one, but the jack points have to be close to in line (within the width of the jack frames) since there aren't any arms to position further inwards.

That rules that out for people without the MWR jack points, although for how comparatively cheap and awesome these look, needing the jack points would be a small price to pay...

Are the MWR points in line (or within a few inches of it) with the front jack points? Do they sit at the same height? If so, I think this would work for you.

I also don't think you use stands with one of these - there's a solid metal arm that you shift into place and lock once the jack is raised fully, and it takes the place of stands.
I've been wondering the same thing... I think the MWR Lift Points are in-line with the front jack points and at nearly the same height. The problem is that they are too far apart (about 71" based on my rough estimate from photos and drawings and an inspection of my car) for all but the 6000XLT model -and that one is a bit higher and more expensive and heavier than the 3500SLX other people are using here.
 
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