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Discussion Starter #1
This pertains to my 2002 Esprit...

Noticed a noise coming from the rear of the car that was new and not motor/transmission related it seemed. I gave the wheels at all four corners a little wiggle and noted the drivers side rear had some play.

Jacked the car and once the weight was off it was clear the bearing is shot as there is quite a bit of play and with the wheel off I can move the brake rotor about 3/16" from side to side...Surprised I did not notice the car complaining sooner with that much wear...

Ordered new bearings from JAE which arrive quickly, they are always great to deal with.

Easy to break it all down but now I find the hub seems to be pressed into the bearing. Makes sense but before I play with this I thought I would see if anyone has been down this path and if there is any info to be had as how best to proceed with removing the old bearing and installing the new. I currently have the bearing/hub in the freezer to see if that helps???

Thanks for any input anyone can provide....
 

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You'll need a press, and you should put it in the oven to make it easier to press the bearing out. Be careful to only press on the outer bearing race, otherwise you'll break apart the new bearing when pressing it in. Use lube like PB Blaster.

When you go to press the new bearing in, you can freeze the bearing, and put the hub in the oven to make it even easier.
 

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Paul,

As Travis says, it's best if you have a press. A few years ago, however, I found myself in a similar situation without a press, so I improvised a little. My first priority was to not damage the hub no matter what else happened, so I nailed together a hub jig made up of 2x4 pieces that supported the hub a few inches off the ground so the bearing had room to come out below. Then I took a BRASS punch...it was a sacrificial piece and I wanted the softest metal to do the job...and blunted the end on the grinding wheel and rounded the edges of the tip a bit as well to make sure that no damage was done to the hub. I carefully and slowly worked the bearing out with the brass punch and a big a$$ hammer that let me apply a lot of force without swinging hard. Fifteen or twenty mintues later, the bearing was out, the punch was blunted even more, and the hub was perfect. The wood and brass were key, though, to making sure no excess stresses were put on the hub and the punch didn't scar the hub.

I used a bearing and race driver set to install the new bearing...using the largest one that would work, so only the outer part of the bearing ever received any pressure, and again working pretty slowly and carefully, and got the new bearing in successfully. Whatever you do, just be sure NOT apply force to the inner race or rollers. You probably realize that, but just in case, the pressure must be on the outermost ring of the bearing or you'll damage the new bearing.

If you've got a press, go that route, but if not, what I've described isn't quite as safe and certainly isn't in the manual, but it worked well for me when I was in a pinch (but was much slower). I hope this helps.
 

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None of the above makes sense for a rear bearing. The bearing is a three-piece affair, with two center race halves and an outer assembly with the balls, seals, and outer housing. The center races are pressed onto the hub, not the outer race. Though you may successfully press the hub out from the bearing, it is more likely that you will have to carefully cut, or at least score and then fracture, the innermost half of the center race. You will then use a press to install the bearing assembly, applying the force to the center races. Alternatively, freezing the hub may allow the bearing to drop into place.
 

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oops sorry. Ok, yeah, don't pay any attention to me. I thought the bearing was a press in the outer part of the hub carrier (Have not done this job). Sanj is right, it is pressed onto the hub via the inner race.

So what I should have said is if possible, only press on the race that is touching the surface that it is being pressed onto ;) Pressing on the outer race in this case will break the bearing.

For this type of assembly, where you can't get to the inner race to press it off, you can use a brearing puller (like a big cigar cutter) to get under the bearing lip at the hub and then pull the bearing off using a press.

One of these

and a press setup like this


Use it similar to this (though this is a differential)
 

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Thanks for the reminder, Sanj. It's been 4 or 5 years since I did mine, so I forgot about it being multi-piece unit. The process with the brass punch, and bearing and race driver, however, is what worked, albiet slowly. Reading your post jogged a few memory cells about why it was such a slow and difficult process that way.
 

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Wow, you must be a very patient person! :D I'm still trying to picture how you got that race off with a punch, kudos!
 

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It's funny...as I was writing the first response, I was trying to remember why it was so hard just to do a bearing and why I had to do it the way I did. Your post helped! I think the total job took me around 4 hours just to replace the bearing!
 

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If you're feeling bored, I have a pair that need to be installed. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
OK, pulled the bearing and the outer race...How do you get a grip on the inner race????

How much grease needs to be applied when assembling the unit???
 

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None of the above makes sense for a rear bearing. The bearing is a three-piece affair, with two center race halves and an outer assembly with the balls, seals, and outer housing. The center races are pressed onto the hub, not the outer race. Though you may successfully press the hub out from the bearing, it is more likely that you will have to carefully cut, or at least score and then fracture, the innermost half of the center race. You will then use a press to install the bearing assembly, applying the force to the center races. Alternatively, freezing the hub may allow the bearing to drop into place.
Of course you would cut, score, or grind the inner race if you are replacing the bearing. Never reuse any old bearing parts with new, ie, the old inner race with new balls and new outer race. If you are replacing the bearing you must replace ALL of it. The bearing separator does not always work, not enough room. Most of the time you have to grind and chisel the inner race off.
David Teitelbaum
 

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My memory may be failing me again on some of the details, but I'm sure this is where I used the wooden jig and the brass punch. If I do recall correctly, I used a tapered punch through the larger holes in the hub to push the race off from behind and the jig stablized the hub so I could work the hard angles. I also remember having a gear puller with flat arms like this out...

http://media.toolking.com/catalog/product/cache/1/image/800x600/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/p/e/performance_w139.jpg

...but I don't remember if I actually as able to use it to get the race started or if it was just something I tried. In any event, I'm sure the brass punch is how I eventually got the job done.

The punch was from a cheap Harbor Freight set that I don't see listed any more, but the middle punch of this set from Northern Tool might work for how I did it. The description says it's six inches in length, and the picture shows that it narrows so it may be able to reach the race through the hole. The thicker the punch, the less angle you will be able to get.

http://www.northerntool.com/images/product/images/155907_lg.jpg

I wish I could remember a few more details so I could be of more help...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Of course you would cut, score, or grind the inner race if you are replacing the bearing. Never reuse any old bearing parts with new, ie, the old inner race with new balls and new outer race. If you are replacing the bearing you must replace ALL of it. The bearing separator does not always work, not enough room. Most of the time you have to grind and chisel the inner race off.
David Teitelbaum
I used a dremel with a very small cutting wheel. Went through a few of them but cut through the inner race at a 45 degree angle and then one shot with a chiesl and it came right off...

Do I need to appy more grease to the new bearing then it came with??? or just press it on???

Thanks for all the help....
 

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The bearing should be greased but if you clearly do not see any you should grease it. Do not over-grease it. Most shops use WD-40 or CRC when pressing to make it move smoother when pressing on. Make sure they press on the inner when pressing the inner and the outer when pressing the outer. NEVER press on the other to insert the opposite race. That damages the bearing races and balls and the bearing will fail prematurely.
David Teitelbaum
 

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Cutting it sounds a lot easier than how I've done it, but I'd be afraid of damaging the hub. Can you say in a little more detail where you cut, how deep, etc., what angle you strike with the chisel, and how to protect the hub during the process. Thanks!
 
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